What are persistent organic pollutants (POPs)? Where can they be found? Why are they hazardous?

 

These are just a few questions that our new course will unpack for you.

 

Keep reading to find out more it!

Have you ever heard of the “Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants”? The Stockholm Convention is a global treaty to protect human health and the environment from persistent organic pollutants (POPs), which are chemicals that remain intact in the environment for long periods and are harmful to both humans and the environment. The Convention was adopted in 2001 building on the principles of the Rio Declaration and aims to support countries in addressing these through a series of mechanisms and processes.

Against this backdrop, UN CC:Learn , UNITAR and the BRS Secretariat teamed up to develop the “National Implementation Plans (NIPs) and the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (POPs)” e-course. This three-module learning experience takes an average of three hours to be completed and will help you understand POPs by explaining what they are, where they can be found and why they are harmful to humans and the environment. This course is geared towards everyone who wishes to learn more about POPs, as well as experts who deal with the topic day-to-day.

Learning Objectives

Each module has specific learning objectives. However, after completing the course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the important contribution of National Implementation Plans (NIPs) towards meeting obligations of the Stockholm Convention
  • Explain steps required to prepare, review and update NIPs
  • Identify the challenges in the process of undertaking POPs inventories
  • Describe how POPs inventories are used in planning exercises
  • Discuss strategies to strengthen NIPs
  • Explain the importance of putting in place the means of regularly reviewing and updating NIPs

Target Audience

While the groups below will find it particularly useful, this course is open to everyone, and we encourage you to take it. The knowledge you will gain can help you in everyday life.

  • Official Contact Points and National Focal Points of Parties for the Stockholm Convention.
  • Members of national steering committees or coordinating bodies for developing and updating NIPs (coordination units) and their different task teams; and
  • Stakeholders, from government, the private sector, civil society, and the public, participating in any of the phases of NIPs preparation, review and updating.

Certification

Participants who score 70% or higher in each one of the three quizzes will be awarded an official UN CC:Learn certificate.

Take the course today!

How can countries address the growing plastic waste problem? This is the question that the new “Plastic Waste and the Basel Convention” unpacks in three content-rich and interactive modules.

 

Read on to learn more about the course!

Plastic waste is a global environmental problem which affects countries and people in several ways. From health issues to the destruction of ecosystems, the plastic waste problem brings about a myriad of negative consequences that disrupt both livelihoods and economies, seriously disturbing the lives of regular citizens, especially the most vulnerable. For instance, improper plastic disposal is leading to increasingly dangerous levels of marine litter, including plastic litter and microplastics, that harm marine life and end up in the global food chain.

In 2019,  the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Movements of Hazardous Wastes and their Disposal and the United Nations Environment Assembly (UNEA)emphasized the role the Basel Convention has in addressing the high and rapidly increasing levels of marine plastic litter and microplastics by preventing plastic waste from entering the marine environment. In a landmark decision, the COP adopted amendments to Annexes II, VIII and IX (the Plastic Waste Amendments), making the Basel Convention the only global legally binding instrument that currently specifically addresses plastic waste.

Currently, there is no consolidated ‘one-stop-shop’ that Basel Convention Focal Points, Competent Authorities and other stakeholders can rely on to gain a comprehensive understanding of the steps needed and the tools and guidance available to ensure prevention and minimization, environmentally sound management and control of transboundary movement of plastic waste. Considering this, the Secretariat of the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) Conventions in cooperation with the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and funded through the European Union (EU) Global Public Goods and Challenges programme (GPGC) developed the “Plastic Waste and the Basel Convention” e-course, which aims to fill this gap.

Learning objectives

After completing the course, learners will be able to:

  • Summarize the key trends, challenges and opportunities related to plastic waste management at global and national level;
  • Discuss the Basel Convention and its key provisions and annexes as well as the role of the Conference of the Parties (COP) and its subsidiary bodies with respect to plastic waste;
  • Explain how different types of plastic waste are classified and must be managed under the Basel Convention

Who should take this course ?

While the course is primarily targeted at the Focal Points and Competent Authorities of the Basel Convention, it is suited for learners irrespective of their level of pre-existing knowledge of the Basel Convention and plastic waste. It may also be useful for other government stakeholders, civil society, the private sector and the general public with some waste management or environment knowledge.

Course Completion and Certification

The successful completion of the course rewards the learner with a certificate. To complete the course, the learner must complete all three modules and pass each associated quiz with a minimum grade of 70% from no more than three attempts. The completion of each module also rewards the learner with a badge.

Take the course!

Air pollution has been damaging people’s health and contributing to environmental degradation. This newly launched affiliated e-course unpacks the Air Convention and its Protocols and lays out the current efforts by UNECE and its member states to address this issue.

 

Read on to find out more!

Have you ever wondered what causes air pollution? Are you interested in learning about the effects of air pollution on your health and the environment? Do you want to learn how we can jointly work on cleaner air? If you replied yes to any of these questions, then you are encouraged to take the e-learning course on the UNECE Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (Air Convention) and its protocols, which has been launched by UNECE and recently affiliated in both English and Russian by UN CC:Learn.

Air pollution impacts our health, environment and economy. Air pollutants come from multiple sources, such as traffic, industry and agriculture, and are transported over large distances and across borders. It is therefore paramount that we take action together — across sectors and national boundaries.

To improve air quality, UNECE Member States have been working successfully since 1979 to reduce air pollution in the region through the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution. This cooperation has led to emission reductions, cleaner air, healthier forests and prevented premature deaths.

However, more needs to be done to achieve cleaner air within the UNECE region and beyond. The Convention has engaged in fostering cooperation between regional initiatives around the world and shared the Convention’s experience and lessons learnt with a view to advancing a shared response to addressing air pollution globally.

To assist countries in effectively addressing air pollution and improve air quality management, the new affiliated e-learning course aims to raise awareness about air pollution and its effects, ways to prevent and reduce harmful emissions, and the Convention and its protocols as an international framework for cooperation on cleaner air. The course was developed with contributions from the European Union, Germany, and Sweden.

Who should take this course?

The course is primarily designed to build the capacities of policymakers, government officials, staff from intergovernmental/non-governmental organizations, private sector professionals, students/academia, and other stakeholders. In particular, this course will be useful for those who cooperate within the Convention framework or those who wish to do so. Taking this course should enable learners to contribute to, and ultimately drive forward, actions on cleaner air.

Learning objectives

The course features four distinct modules that aim to equip participants with the knowledge and resource materials to understand the main concepts in air pollution management, the basic principles of the Convention, and Parties’ obligations under the Convention and its protocols. The course is self-paced and can be completed according to the schedule of the learner. Each module uses a mix of learning tools and features engaging content with clear storylines, complemented by videos, interactive features, relevant tools, and links to additional resources.

After completing the course, learners will be able to:

  • Identify key air pollutants and their sources and effects
  • Recall measures to reduce and prevent air pollution
  • Recognize the value of the Convention as a framework for international cooperation to reduce air pollution
  • Define basic principles under the Convention and its protocols
  • Explain the basic obligations under the Convention’s protocols
  • Identify the key stakeholders and processes under the Convention and its protocols

Certification and evaluation

To successfully complete the course and gain a Certificate of Completion, participants can take an end-of-course assessment. Once the certification criteria have been met (passing score 70%), and after completing a course evaluation form, participants will be able to download their certificate from the course’s webpage.

Affiliation programme

The UN CC:Learn affiliation programme highlights high-quality e-learning products on climate change developed by recognized institutions outside the framework of the UN CC:Learn programme / without support from the UN CC:Learn Secretariat, in accordance with specific affiliation criteria. The objective of the UN CC:Learn affiliation programme is to enhance global climate literacy through dissemination of high-level learning products that complement UN CC:Learn resources.

Take the course!

UN CC:Learn has partnered up with WHO, UNITAR and Climate Tracker to come up with a course that unpacks the interlinkages between climate change and health. In the lead-up to COP26 and amid a global pandemic, approaching these topics together has never been so important. Read on to find out more!

Human-driven climate change is expected to cause 250,000 additional deaths per year from 2030 to 2050, as well as billions of extra costs to countries throughout the globe. Also, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the important interlinkages between human health and the state of our environment and economies. As societies expand and develop, addressing human health and climate change as two intertwined topics has never been so important.

In light of these challenge and aiming at supporting delegates participating in the upcoming UN climate change negotiations (COP26), UN CC:Learn, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and Climate Tracker have developed a brand new e-course on Climate Change Negotiations and Health.

The newly launched e-course is entirely self-paced, has 6 lessons and takes an average of 3 hours to be completed. It unveils the interlinkages between climate change and health and sheds light on how international treaties on climate change address health issue. Additionally, the course is supported by two webinars on negotiation skills (webinar 1and webinar 2). Upon completion of the course, users will be able to:

  • Explain how climate change affects health.
  • Recognize the international climate change policy framework.
  • Identify the Parties and groups of Parties to the UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, including their respective commitments and negotiation positions.
  • Describe the outcomes of past negotiation sessions.
  • Discuss the key issues in the ongoing international climate change negotiations, particularly in relation to the promotion of health priorities and the integration of health in all policies.

The course is open to anybody interested. However, it should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  1. Health sector professionals participating in international climate change negotiations and in national climate change-related processes;
  2. Environmental sector professionals participating in international and national climate change processes as well as climate change negotiators;
  3. Other interested government officials and practitioners;
  4. Academics and university students;
  5. Other individuals interested in learning about the promotion of health priorities in the context of climate change and climate change negotiations.

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, which means scoring 70% or more in the final quiz within 3 attempts, users will get an official UN CC:Learn certificate.

Take the course here.

Hassan Mowlid is a public health professional and a UN CC:Learn champion from Somalia. He has co-founded the Somali Greenpeace Association and has trained more than 1,000 youth on climate change. He is inspired to keep training others on climate issues and biodiversity. Read his story and discover how powerful can be to lead education programmes on climate change at local level.

My name is Hassan Mowlid Yasin, and I am a public health and public administration professional from Somalia. I am also an environmental activist, co-founder and vice-chairperson of the Somali Greenpeace Association, and the National Chapter Lead for Somalia for the African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC).

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

I took my first online course on the UN CC:Learn platform in 2017, and since then my life – in relation to the environment, and climate change issues – has changed completely. I have now taken ten different UN CC:Learn courses, including those on Gender and Environment, Human Health and Climate Change, and Children and Climate Change. These have helped me to begin advocating on climate change and environmental protection.

Through various initiatives, I have now trained more than 1,000 youth on what climate change is and how it is impacting our life. I have also co-founded the Somali Greenpeace Association (SOGPA), which aims to address climate change issues, food security and biodiversity loss in my country. Through the association, we have taken a number of different actions to raise awareness around climate change and environmental issues among different groups of people.

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

For instance, we have developed a number of tree-planting initiatives at different schools, youth centres and at the Somali National University. As part of these initiatives, we have conducted field training and education sessions on the importance of tree planting as a climate mitigation action, as well as awareness training on the negative impacts of deforestation, and sessions on plant protection.

We’ve also conducted different education programmes on climate change, and for World Environment Day 2020 trained more than 100 local youth on the importance of biodiversity for addressing climate issues. This including educating these on the interlinkages between climate, biodiversity, and peace and security. SOGPA also raised awareness on these linkages on World Peace Day, which we celebrated with the theme “Give Peace to the Environment”. As well as youth groups, we’ve also trained the Somali police on the issue of environmental protection.

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

Photo: Hassan Mowlid Yasin

Finally, developing this knowledge and understand has also allowed me to partner with like-minded youth groups who share similar climate and environmental goals. I’m now a representative on numerous youth organizations in both Africa and beyond, including the United Nations Environment Programme for Children and Youth (UNEP MGCY), Global Youth Biodiversity Network (GYBN), African Youth Initiative on Climate Change (AYICC), Plant for the Planet (PFP), Climate Change Educators Network (CE Educator’s Network), and African Union’s Youth, Peace and Security Network for the East African Region (AU-EA YPS Network).

Get Involved:

Are you involved in training your local community on climate change? How are you doing that and what results have you reached? Share your testimonial on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter and tag UN CC:Learn. We are looking forward to getting in touch with you!

Start your learning journey:

Access our e-learning platform on unccelearng.org and take free courses on climate change and green economy. You may be interested in learning about:

The course aims to support delegates attending the 26th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and participating in climate diplomacy. It also provides valuable insights for the professionals involved in the development and implementation of national climate change and health policies. 

Enroll
  • Health
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

3 hours

Welcome

It is increasingly evident that environmental challenges have an impact on human health, reinforcing existing risks. For instance, it is estimated that climate change will cause around 250,000 additional deaths per year between 2030 and 2050 – linked to issues ranging from malnutrition to heat stress, with direct costs to health expected to be between USD 2-4 billion/year by 20301. Also, the current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the important interlinkages between human health and the state of our environment and economies.

With the recognition that the equilibrium between people and planet is one of the fundamental issues of our time, this online course delves into the interlinkages between climate change and health, with particular reference to the international climate change policy process and the need for a healthy a green recovery from COVID-19.

Specifically, the course aims to support delegates attending the 26th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and participating in climate diplomacy. It also provides valuable insights for the professionals involved in the development and implementation of national climate change and health policies. 

What you will learn?

The ultimate objective of the course is to support participants in addressing health within climate change negotiations and national policy processes, as well as in considering climate change in health policies.

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how climate change affects health;
  • Recognize the international climate change policy framework;
  • Identify the Parties and groups of Parties to the UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, including their respective commitments and negotiation positions;
  • Describe the outcomes of past negotiation sessions;
  • Discuss the key issues in the ongoing international climate change negotiations, particularly in relation to the promotion of health priorities and the integration of health in all policies.

Course at a Glance

The course features key information on climate change and its impacts on human health, provides an overview of the climate change negotiations so far, and considers entry points to address health issues and priorities within climate change negotiations and policies. It is divided into six lessons:

Lesson 1: Introduction to Health and Climate Change
Lesson 2: History of the UN Climate Negotiations
Lesson 3: The Paris Agreement
Lesson 4: From Paris to Glasgow
Lesson 5: Health in the UN Climate Change Negotiations
Lesson 6: Healthy and Green Recovery from COVID-19

Who is this course for?

The course provides clear, concise, and up-to-date information for anybody interested in addressing the health risks arising from climate change. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

1) Health sector professionals participating in international climate change negotiations and in national climate change-related processes;
2) Environmental sector professionals participating in international and national climate change processes as well as climate change negotiators;
3) Other interested government officials and practitioners;
4) Academics and university students;
5) Other individuals interested in learning about the promotion of health priorities in the context of climate change and climate change negotiations.

Methodology

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It is adapted to the schedule of professionals in full-time work. Participants are provided with the opportunity to learn through various experiences: absorb (read); interact (activity); and reflect (relate to one’s own reality).

The course includes a series of self-standing interactive lessons with different activities, exercises, case studies, and videos. It also contains a wealth of links to other resources on health and climate change and is thus a gateway to more in-depth and specific information.

A quiz at the end of the course allows participants to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. A quiz is successfully passed at a score of 70% or higher, within three attempts. Once the certification criteria have been met, learners can download a certificate of completion from the “Certification” section of the course webpage.

After the completion, participants have the possibility to submit a feedback form accessible on the course webpage.

How climate change can impact on disease outbreaks such as Zika or Dengue? Andrea Monroy-Licht our UN CC:Learn Champion has been leading a project called Salud 1.5º.  This initiative seeks to encourage students to take action against the health risks associated with climate change and global warming. This Colombian teacher from Barranquilla has already made positive changes in her community and is looking forward to replicating this project in other cities. Discover more about her environmental education activities on climate change issues which aims at mitigating the effects associated with vector-borne diseases.

My name is Andrea Monroy-Licht, and I am a Professor at the Universidad del Norte in Barranquilla, Colombia. Together with my colleague Ricardo Gutierrez, I lead the Cell Biology course, which is taught to first-year medical students.

Andrea Monroy-Licht profile picture | Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

Andrea Monroy-Licht profile picture | Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

Completing the UN CC:Learn course on Human Health and Climate Change inspired us to change our approach to teaching students taking the Cell Biology course, in order to integrate climate change and global warming issues.  The increase in temperatures caused by climate change can activate the migration processes of vectors – such as mosquitoes – to other regions, thus increasing the likelihood of disease outbreaks such as Zika, Dengue, Chikungunya, and Malaria in areas where these outbreaks were previously not common. Similarly, high temperatures in several areas tend to increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases associated with heat shock.

This evidence led us to create a project called Salud 1.5ºC – a space to enhance critical thinking skills around the relationship between human health and the health of our planet. This initiative seeks to encourage students to take action against the health risks associated with climate change and global warming, through the completion of an environmental management project. Four topics are currently being worked on in parallel:

  1. heat shock diseases,
  2. vector-borne diseases (e.g. from mosquitoes),
  3. health risks associated with water pollution by microplastics, and
  4. the effects of environmental pollutants such as endocrine disruptors.
Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

The project involves 159 students and 48 families. Within these families, the students implement actions related to environmental education on climate change issues which are aimed at mitigating the effects associated with vector-borne diseases – through prevention campaigns and the reduction of sources that induce the increase of mosquito vectors. On the issue of heat shock diseases, students carry out tree planting and eco-environmental initiatives to reduce high temperatures in some parts of their homes. For the microplastics project, students lead campaigns for the recycling, reuse, and reduction of this type of materials in their homes. Finally, on the topic of chemicals with potential endocrine-disrupting effects, students educate their families about the risks that these products pose to their health and ecosystems when discarded. They also propose the use of alternative natural products with low environmental impact.

Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

Photo: Andrea Monroy-Licht

Through the Salud 1.5ºC project, we hope to encourage more and more people to join these initiatives.  To date, the project has reached 461 people: 199 students and 262 family members. It continues to operate under pandemic conditions, which fills us with happiness as there are no excuses for not taking care of the planet. Importantly, this project is demonstrating that with the commitment of each of us many actions can be implemented to mitigate climate change and the pollution of the planet. Looking forwards, we are planning to consolidate a strategy that can be replicated in other subjects, universities, and cities  – multiplying actions for our health and the health of the planet.

Get involved:

Tell us about the sustainable actions you are taking at your home, school, or workplace that contribute to tackling climate change. Share your actions with us on Facebook, InstagramTwitter or LinkedIn. Any action is often better than no action.

Start your learning journey:

Access our e-learning platform on unccelearng.org and take free courses on climate change and green economy. If you don’t know how to start, join our learning community and access our free course on Human Health and Climate Change.

Food waste is a problem that can no longer be ignored because every bit of food that ends up in the garbage also means a waste of resources such as water, farmland, and energy needed to produce food. Some developers have taken it upon themselves to find ways to connect people to food that would go to waste, and so helping to reduce the amount of food thrown out every day. Here are six apps that will change the way you buy food.

In a world where one in nine people on earth (about 795 million people) don’t have food to eat, we continuously waste 1.3 billion tons of edible food each year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. This means that one-third of all the food produced for human consumption is lost.

Selecting flawless vegetables and fruits has become a habit for many consumers. Bright yellow bananas without any brown spots, perfectly shaped orange bell peppers, and apples that have an impeccable red glow sans bruises. In reality, this “harmless” habit contributes to perfectly edible food getting thrown out because of how it looks. Ultimately, food waste is responsible for over seven percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), making it a key challenge in tackling climate change.

Did you know that in the United Kingdom, 1.4 million bananas are thrown away every day?

Food waste is a problem that can no longer be ignored because every bit of food that ends up in the garbage also means a waste of resources such as water, farmland, and energy needed to produce food in the first place. Some developers have taken it upon themselves to find ways to connect people to food that would otherwise go to waste, and so helping to reduce the amount of food thrown out every day.

YourLocal: To fight food waste in Denmark, two friends came up with the idea to link consumers to local shops that have leftover food. Given its success, in 2015 YourLocal became the first app to help small businesses and supermarkets sell surplus food that would otherwise go to waste.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

Too Good To Go: The concept is simple: through a free smartphone app, Too Good To Go helps food stores sell their surplus food instead of throwing it away. The best part? People get to enjoy good food at a fraction of the price. This free smartphone app is available in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland and the UK, with plans to expand to other countries. If you live in one of these countries, start saving on food today.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

In 2017, Too Good To Go users saved over 2 million meals that would probably have ended in the garbage.

Olio: Next time you are going on a long weekend getaway, think about sharing your vegetables and fruits with your neighbor. This app allows users to connect with neighbors or local shops that have surplus food. You can also browse for food that’s available nearby (all products are free or for donation to charity) and arrange for a pick-up.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

No Food Wasted: This app allows people in the Netherlands to know when products that are close to their “best-before” date go on sale at their local supermarket. This means you can quickly change your shopping list, buy products that are marked down, and save money.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

In developing countries, 40 percent of losses occur during the harvest and processing level. In industrialized countries, 40 percent of losses happen at the retail or consumer level. Source: FAO.

We Save Eat: To tackle food waste in Barcelona, stores post their surplus food on We Save Eat and users are able to purchase products at a reduced price. If you own a food shop in Barcelona, you can sign up to be part of the We Save Eat community.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

Flashfood: Available in the United States and Canada, Flashfood allows people to immediately browse food deals near them. This not only saves money for shoppers, but it increases revenues for vendors while contributing to diminishing environmental impacts.
The app is available for download here.

Become conscious about your food consumption is the first step toward a sustainable lifestyle. However, you can take a further step and learn in-depth on how your diet impacts the environment and our planet by taking our e-course on Sustainable Diet, currently available in English and Portuguese.

Are you using one of these apps? If so, how has it changed your daily habits? Tell us on Facebook or Instagram, we want to know!

Our food habits and daily choices affect our health the health of the planet. This course helps participants gain knowledge to make their diets healthier and more sustainable. It discusses farming, buy food locally, waste and packaging, and changing eating habits.

 

“I learn so much about how our diet can impact the environment. After taking this course, I feel like I’m ready to adjust my diet in order to save the planet.” – Learner from India

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Health
  • Youth
  • Education

Self-paced course

2 hours

Key Results

  • 33.800 enrolments
  • 12.900 certificates issued

Welcome

Be a part of the sustainable food revolution! Learn how your food habits and daily choices are affecting your health and that of the planet. Gain the skills and knowledge to make your diet more healthy and sustainable. After completing the course you will be able to:

  • Explain what is at stake: how your food choices affect your health and the environment?
  • Make better food choices that consider both human and planetary well-being
  • Identify ways in which changing your diet makes a positive impact
  • Develop a personal sustainable and healthy diet plan or project

The course will help you take action to counter climate change and lead a sustainable and healthy lifestyle!

The course at a glance

  1. Our Choices Matter: How the way we consume and produce food affects our health and the planet.

2. Better Farming: Why should we pay attention to farming methods?

3. Buying Food Locally: Why should we care where our food comes from?

4. Is Processed Food Bad?: Is processed food always unhealthy?

5. Reading the Labels: How to get the right information for a better food choice?

6. Food Waste and Packaging: When is packaging necessary, when and how can it be avoided?

7. Changing Eating Habits: How to change eating habits for a healthier, sustainable lifestyle?

8. My Plate, My Pledge: What will you do to improve your health and that of the planet?

Completion Requirements

After completing the course you will get a certificate. All you need to do is complete all 7 videos, factsheets and activities, as well as choose your sustainable food pledge before the certificate becomes automatically available to download.

You can keep track of your progress and download your certificate under the “Certification” tab on the main course page.

Partners

Special thanks to Danone for the support in realizing this course.

Disclaimer

This course (video) is made available for educational purposes only.

It aims to provide general information on the relation between food, human health, and environmental
sustainability, in order to enable people to make more informed choices based on their own convictions, priorities, cultures, and beliefs.

The images and references used in this course are for illustrative purposes only.

This course should not be relied upon or used as a substitute for professional
medical or nutritional advice.

 

Climate change is causing both scarcity and abundance of water. This has serious impacts on health, agriculture, energy and infrastructure. This course looks at integrated approaches to water management, and how these can help adaptation efforts.

Enroll
  • Health
  • Climate Change
  • Energy
  • Adaptation

Tutorial

0.45 hours

Welcome

This tutorial introduces the concept of mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.

Who should take this course

  • The engaged public and practitioners with an interest in better understanding the cross-sectoral linkages between water resources and climate change.
  • Policy-makers wanting to increase their understanding on how an integrated approach to water management can help adaptation across sectors and how it can be an entry-point for their National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). 
  • Policy-makers and experts attending the NAP-GSP face-to-face regional training on Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.  

Completion requirements

This course does not have a learning assessment therefore, a certificate will not be issued.

Partners

This tutorial is a learning initiative of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) as part of the National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP).  It is part of the support to the NAP Toolkit to the face-to-face training package.  The NAP-GSP is a joint programme, implemented by UNDP and UN Environment, in collaboration with other UN Agencies to assist countries with their NAP processes.  The programme is funded through the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) and Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF).