Food waste is a problem that can no longer be ignored because every bit of food that ends up in the garbage also means a waste of resources such as water, farmland, and energy needed to produce food. Some developers have taken it upon themselves to find ways to connect people to food that would go to waste, and so helping to reduce the amount of food thrown out every day. Here are six apps that will change the way you buy food.

In a world where one in nine people on earth (about 795 million people) don’t have food to eat, we continuously waste 1.3 billion tons of edible food each year, according to the Food and Agriculture Organization. This means that one-third of all the food produced for human consumption is lost.

Selecting flawless vegetables and fruits has become a habit for many consumers. Bright yellow bananas without any brown spots, perfectly shaped orange bell peppers, and apples that have an impeccable red glow sans bruises. In reality, this “harmless” habit contributes to perfectly edible food getting thrown out because of how it looks. Ultimately, food waste is responsible for over seven percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs), making it a key challenge in tackling climate change.

Did you know that in the United Kingdom, 1.4 million bananas are thrown away every day?

Food waste is a problem that can no longer be ignored because every bit of food that ends up in the garbage also means a waste of resources such as water, farmland, and energy needed to produce food in the first place. Some developers have taken it upon themselves to find ways to connect people to food that would otherwise go to waste, and so helping to reduce the amount of food thrown out every day.

YourLocal: To fight food waste in Denmark, two friends came up with the idea to link consumers to local shops that have leftover food. Given its success, in 2015 YourLocal became the first app to help small businesses and supermarkets sell surplus food that would otherwise go to waste.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

Too Good To Go: The concept is simple: through a free smartphone app, Too Good To Go helps food stores sell their surplus food instead of throwing it away. The best part? People get to enjoy good food at a fraction of the price. This free smartphone app is available in Belgium, Denmark, France, Germany, the Netherlands, Norway, Switzerland and the UK, with plans to expand to other countries. If you live in one of these countries, start saving on food today.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

In 2017, Too Good To Go users saved over 2 million meals that would probably have ended in the garbage.

Olio: Next time you are going on a long weekend getaway, think about sharing your vegetables and fruits with your neighbor. This app allows users to connect with neighbors or local shops that have surplus food. You can also browse for food that’s available nearby (all products are free or for donation to charity) and arrange for a pick-up.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

No Food Wasted: This app allows people in the Netherlands to know when products that are close to their “best-before” date go on sale at their local supermarket. This means you can quickly change your shopping list, buy products that are marked down, and save money.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

In developing countries, 40 percent of losses occur during the harvest and processing level. In industrialized countries, 40 percent of losses happen at the retail or consumer level. Source: FAO.

We Save Eat: To tackle food waste in Barcelona, stores post their surplus food on We Save Eat and users are able to purchase products at a reduced price. If you own a food shop in Barcelona, you can sign up to be part of the We Save Eat community.
The app is available for iPhone and Android.

Flashfood: Available in the United States and Canada, Flashfood allows people to immediately browse food deals near them. This not only saves money for shoppers, but it increases revenues for vendors while contributing to diminishing environmental impacts.
The app is available for download here.

Become conscious about your food consumption is the first step toward a sustainable lifestyle. However, you can take a further step and learn in-depth on how your diet impacts the environment and our planet by taking our e-course on Sustainable Diet, currently available in English and Portuguese.

Are you using one of these apps? If so, how has it changed your daily habits? Tell us on Facebook or Instagram, we want to know!

Trade can power a greener economic recovery from the pandemic. Global demand for environmental goods and services is set to rise, as countries roll out rescue packages with large provisions for climate-friendly solutions. This course introduces participants to key approaches to harness green trade opportunities.

Enroll
  • Green Economy
  • Finance
  • Cities
  • Energy

Self-paced course

2 hours

Welcome

World trade patterns show that while many developing countries are now playing an increasing role in trade, many other—and particularly least developed countries who account for less than 1% of all global trade—remain stranded on the margins. Still heavily reliant on natural resource-based products and raw materials for their exports, these countries are highly vulnerable to economic and environmental shocks.

The transition to an inclusive green economy represents many significant opportunities. By harnessing the increasing global demand for environmental goods and services, as well as consumer demand for more sustainable products, countries can diversify their economies, reduce their commodity dependence and boost their competitiveness. Thus, societies promote long-term, sustainable development while also strengthening their capacity to tackle the manifold environmental challenges lying ahead.

Trade can also power a green economic recovery from COVID-19. Global demand for environmental goods and services is expected to rise as countries roll out economic stimuli with larger earmarks for climate-friendly solutions. While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the various approaches that may be taken to harness green trade opportunities.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Outline the evolution of legal and governance frameworks underpinning the trade and green economy interface
  • Identify perceived challenges and potential opportunities related to trade in the transition to a green economy
  • Describe enabling policy conditions to foster green trade practices
  • Highlight sectoral case studies of green trade in action

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of the policy instruments and enabling conditions needed for countries to advance the green economy transition via green trade, and vice-versa. It contains four lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The trade and environment interface
  2. Perceived tensions and synergies between trade liberalization and the green economy
  3. Enabling conditions and policy design for green trade
  4. Seizing sectoral opportunities

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Green fiscal policies can help make public expenditures more efficient. This is key as the world strives to ‘build back better’ after the COVID-19 pandemic. This course introduces participants to the fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to transition to a green economy.

 

“I love the course. It touches the real-life activities” – Learner from Ecuador

Enroll
  • Green Economy
  • Cities
  • Finance
  • Energy

Self-paced course

2 hours

Welcome

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed many fragilities of our economies and deepened existing inequalities and imbalances. However, long before the pandemic hit nations across the world, many economies were marked by harmful and inefficient use of public and private resources, reinforcing environmental degradation, biodiversity loss, global warming and vulnerabilities linked to health and social exclusion. In the wake of the health and economic crisis, citizens are increasingly demanding a departure from business-as-usual approaches in favour of truly innovative and green policies. Similarly, many governments recognize that the transformative potential of this circumstance must not be wasted.

Greening recovery efforts can help nations build forward better after the pandemic to increase the well-being of people and resilience of countries to future crises. Green fiscal policies in particular can play a key role in countries’ recovery efforts by removing inefficiencies in public expenditures and raising additional fiscal revenues which can be directed towards immediate COVID-19 relief measures while supporting longer-term investments.  While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the green fiscal policy tools and approaches to foster a more sustainable future

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for greater use of green fiscal policy
  • List different fiscal instruments to promote desirable economic, social and environmental outcomes
  • Describe the key stages of the policy cycle
  • Highlight the main opportunities and challenges presented by the energy, transport and waste management sectors
  • Outline how international collaboration enhances fiscal policy action taken at the national level

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to advance the green economy transition. It contains five lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The need for green fiscal policy
  2. Fiscal instruments for greening the economy
  3. Effective strategies for fiscal reform
  4. Applying green fiscal policy in key sectors
  5. Collaborating for impact

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Young activists and researchers from Argentina participated in a tailored workshop on climate change mitigation. They discussed ways on how to prepare cities for the context of climate change and how a local cooperative can play a key role in raising awareness at the community level.

The countries of the Southern Cone are no exception to the greater frequency and intensity of extreme events due to climate change. According to the National Meteorological Service, 2017 was the warmest recorded year in the history of Argentina, both in the summer and winter, with an average annual temperature of 16.66°C. In addition to the progressive rise in temperature, variations in precipitation have resulted in more intense rains and longer periods of drought throughout the country.

Poster of the workshop, disseminated through the channels of CEVA, FECOOTRA, CECOOP, the Secretary of Extension of the Faculty of Natural Sciences and the Museum of the UNLP.

For the first time, the Center for Education and Cooperative Training (CECOOP) of the Federation of Cooperatives of Labor of the Argentine Republic (FECOOTRA), together with the José María Arizmendiarrieta Study Center, held a workshop focused on climate change. Following UN CC:Learn’s premise of “leaving no one behind” in its goal of disseminating knowledge on climate change, CECOOP organized the workshop so that any interested person could attend, without any registration costs for participants.

According to Guillermo Villate, the workshop was carried out within the framework of the principles of commitment to the community and to the environment, from which the CECOOP proposes to raise awareness at the community level, with regard to taking care of the environment.

Introduction to Climate Change Adaptation of the UN CC:e-Learn course. Photo: UN Environment

CECOOP based the training on the material of the UN CC:Learn Introductory e-Course on Climate Change, which provides the foundations of climate change, covering topics from climate science to governance. Over the past three years, thousands of people around the world have learned about climate change and its threats through this online course. In terms of education on climate change, this is the United Nations initiative with greatest reach, since it is a free course and is currently available in five languages.

The workshop motivated the exchange of ideas and experiences, generating debates and making the learning experience more enriching on what to do to face climate change and the activities that produce CO2. In addition to the content of the UN CC:Learn course, complementary activities were carried out with access to other documentary materials, videos and a closing Interdisciplinary Lecture on Climate Change with researchers from the Faculty of Natural Sciences and the National University of La Plata Museum.

Activity among the participants during one of the workshop sessions. Photo: CECOOP

The delivery of the workshop was approached from the perspective of the city of La Plata, where the case of mitigation to climate change was exposed particularly in Argentina, through the experiences of the cooperative “Creando Conciencia”. The mission of this Cooperative is to take care of the environment through the differentiated collection of waste with final disposal of each of them according to their characteristics. It also classifies, conditions and reinserts recyclable waste.

Among the participants of the workshop was a victim of the floods that occurred in 2013. Since then, Francisca Pinto has set out to register indicators, which she seeks to transfer to a digital format in the future, so that these serve as a source of information to benefit society in the legislative, administrative and training fields.

Participants during one of the workshop sessions. Photo: CECOOP

I could understand an issue that is not how it should be discussed within society and at the political level. I thought it was an interesting initiative that would be good to replicate in other places to continue to reach more people to generate collective awareness and allows to put on the world’s agenda the solution to the challenge of climate change.“ – Manuel María De Arrieta, participant of the workshop on climate change.

Upon the positive experience and good reception of the workshop, CECOOP intends to continue replicating the course in different regions of the country and include other fields of study among them, for example, how to prepare cities for the context of climate change through infrastructure. They also intend to continue raising awareness among communities about climate change and generate a collective interest in this important issue that threatens the entire world.

Nura Jib, founder of the African Climate Change Research Centre based in Nigeria explains how the ‘Cities and Climate Change’ e-course has enriched his CV and added advantage over his peers.

A graduate from the Ahmadu Bello University in Zaria, Nigeria, Nura Jibo works as a Quantity Surveyor. He has nine years of experience in the financial management of institutional, residential and commercial buildings and properties. He successfully manages mega projects by making sure that the energy used in construction employs modern technology. He also aims to create efficient buildings through visionary designs, all without compromising the highest standards of comfort and health.

Nura Jibo at COP22 in Marrakesh, Morocco, 2018. /©Nura Jibo

Founder of the African Climate Change Research Centre, a United Nations climate observer organization based in Jigawa state, Nigeria, is an expert in cities, eco-mobility and climate change. Since 2010, Nura has led the Research and Independent Non-Governmental Organization (RINGO) delegates that work on climate-smart buildings and technologies for the United Nations Conference of Parties (COP).

In 2017, while scrolling his Facebook feed, Nura found out about UN CC:e-Learn courses. He visited the website and found a course that was very much in line with his professional track of work: Cities and Climate Change.

I took the course and got my first UN certificate! The course really boosted my morale and enriched my CV because it gave me an added academic advantage over my peers,” he says.

Nura at COP21. Paris, France 2015. /©Nura Jibo

Not everyone in his network has knowledge of how cities cause or contribute to climate change. For Nura, taking the course on cities “improved his career goal as a climate change solution enthusiast.”

Hungry to learn more, Nura decided to enroll in other courses offered by UN CC:e-Learn. He took the Children and Climate Change course and the REDD+ Academy e-course. He completed and received certificates for these courses too.

The three courses really enhanced my career goals and aspirations as a UN Designated Contact Point on climate change in Nigeria. It also rekindled a ray of hope in me because I never thought that I would find such important courses online and for free!” he says.

I am really happy to be obtaining formal training certificates on climate change and its impact on our societies through UN CC:e-Learn,” he adds.

Nura encourages others to visit the UN CC:e-Learn platform and register for any of the courses available.

Any of these courses will change one’s point of view on how climate change is affecting our cosmopolitan planet. I encourage all to do it, because climate change is everybody’s business.”

Find out more of his projects here:

Nura teaching a primary school student how to plant a tree and care for it. The African Climate Change Research Centre’s Going Green at Grassroots (3Gs) is a tree planting project in northern Nigeria which started in 2010 to help minimize deforestation and desertification problems in the area./©Nura Jibo

UN CC:Learn and WMO launch a joint new e-course to enhance climate information for climate actions. Registration open!

While to date, 197 UNFCCC members have signed the Paris Agreement and 187 ratified it, thus pledging to keep the increase in global average temperature well below 2°C above pre-industrial levels, it remains a challenging endeavor.

Member states need to make choices between a range of possible actions requiring information on past, present and potential future climate conditions. Adapting to climate change requires the development of the best available scientific information about climate change trends and their societal impacts. The generation and use of climate information for planning and decision-making should be strengthened, drawing on the best available climate observations, data and science.

To ensure the best societal outcomes from climate action, information on past, present and potential future climate conditions should be systematically integrated into national adaptation policies and project planning. The relevance and adequacy of climate information for decision-making can be identified through multi-stakeholder and country-level processes, drawing on the resources of the global hydro-meteorological community and information flowing across global to local scales. Synergies must be enabled among communities that produce climate information and those who use it for climate action. While producers gather, analyze and compile climate information, users need to know what kind of information is available out there that can support adaptation planning.

The course Integrating Climate Risk Information into NAPs, developed by the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), the Global Framework for Climate Services (GFCS), and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) comes to support communities showing how to strengthen National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) through appropriate climate information and coordinated policy action, enabling various institutions and actors to work together in a collaborative framework.

The course answers several questions:

  • Why is climate information important in adaptation planning and decision making?
  • What are the technical resources for assessing climate risks?
  • What is the role of National Hydro-meteorological Services in the NAP process?
  • How can priority climate actions be enhanced by climate scientific information?
  • What climate products and services that support NAPs are out there?

The course is designed to respond the learning needs of climate services providers (National Hydro-meteorological Services, research/academic and international organizations), and users (e.g. decision-makers, private investors, non-governmental organizations, etc.), as well as of those working at the science-policy interface for outreach or communication purposes.

The course may eventually catalyze innovation in climate services, enabling climate information users and producers to co-produce climate knowledge, sharing feedback, engaging and connecting with different actors along the climate services value chain for the development of tailored information and products for better adaptation decision making.

This course is free of charge and you can register here.

Urban areas contribute to climate change and are also negatively affected by it. This course introduces participants to the ways in which climate change adaptation and mitigation can be considered in urban planning. It also outlines examples of how cities can play a positive, transformational role in tackling it.

 

“This is the best among the online courses I’ve taken so far. The case studies provide the application of theories and models as inspiration for future projects. I highly recommend it to colleagues.” – Learner from Brazil

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Cities
  • Youth
  • Adaptation

Short course

2 hours

Welcome

This course focuses on climate change in urban areas, covering how cities are affected by climate change, how they contribute to it, as well as how they plan for it.

What you will learn

At the end of the course you will be able to:

  • Describe urban trends for the 21st century.
  • Describe the transformative role that cities can play in achieving green and climate-resilient development.
  • Explain how urban areas are affected by, and contribute to, climate change.
  • Explain how climate change adaptation and mitigation can be considered in urban planning.
  • Identify specific adaptation and mitigation measures suitable for urban areas.

Course at a glance

This specialized module has six sections:

  1. Cities in the 21st century
  2. Effects of climate change on cities
  3. Cities as contributors to climate change
  4. Integrating climate change adaptation and mitigation in urban planning
  5. Urban climate change adaptation and mitigation in practice
  6. Overview of major initiatives related to climate change and cities

Completion requirements

Once the quiz is completed with above 70% of passing scores, you will receive a certificate of completion from UN-Habitat and UNITAR. You have three attempts to try the quiz.

Partners and Contributors

The module has been developed and peer-reviewed through UN CC:Learn, with technical leadership provided by the United Nations Human Settlements Programme (UN-Habitat).

 

Basic knowledge about climate change is needed more than ever. For example, what temperature change is projected for this century? How do international negotiations work? What adaptation and mitigation options exist? This course provides answers to these and other introductory questions about climate change.

 

“From basic to advanced modules, this course is very comprehensive and brilliant.” – Learner from Spain

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Science
  • Cities
  • Education
  • Youth
  • Finance
  • Adaptation
  • Energy

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

This e-course provides “everything you need to know” about the basics of climate change. It is divided into six modules, each taking an average of 2 hours to complete. Each has 4 to 5 learning objectives. A short quiz at the end of each module allows you to verify if you have achieved these learning objectives. You have three attempts to try each quiz.

What you will learn

After completing the course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the fundamentals of climate change science.
  • Present the international climate change legal and policy framework and explain key issues under negotiation.
  • Describe the expected consequences of climate change and the role of adaptation.
  • Provide a rationale for climate change mitigation and propose actions in key sectors.
  • Identify the main streams of climate change finance.
  • Outline basic elements of planning processes to deliver climate change action.
  • Analyze principal challenges and opportunities for climate change action.

The course at a glance

The course is structured around six basic modules:

  1. Climate Change Science
  2. International Legal and Policy Framework for Climate Change
  3. Climate Change Adaptation
  4. Climate Change Mitigation
  5. Climate Change Finance
  6. Planning for Climate Change

Completion requirements

Once all 6 modules are completed with above 70% of passing scores individually, you will receive a certificate of completion. Your certificate will be automatically available on the ‘achievement’ section under the course page. You can decide to take all modules or choose to select those that most interest you.

 

Citizens in every country need to understand climate change, and what it means for them and for the world. The course provides an introduction to key climate actions, such as adaptation, low carbon development, climate finance, and climate negotiations. Participants will also formulate a pledge, project or policy.

 

“I loved this course – it helped me understand the way our climate is changing, and what is needed in order to stop climate change. It has motivated me to keep learning, get involved, and take action.” – Learner from India

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Youth
  • Adaptation
  • Finance
  • Science
  • Education
  • Cities
  • Energy

Self-paced course

8 hours

Think, Learn, Act Climate!

The course helps you understand what climate change is, how it affects you and others, and what can be done to address it. After completing the course, participants will be able to answer the following:

  • What is climate change?
  • How do we adapt to the negative impacts of climate change?
  • What opportunities exist for a low carbon future?
  • How do we plan and finance climate actions?
  • How do climate negotiations work?

Participants will also develop a concrete action plan or project to tackle climate change!

The Course at a Glance

Module 1: What is climate change and how does it affect us?
Module 2: How to adapt to climate change?
Module 3: How to mitigate climate change?
Module 4: How to plan and finance action on climate change?
Module 5: How do climate change negotiations work?
Module 6: How to tackle climate change in practice?

Each module takes two hours to complete and features videos, lessons, and exercises that give you an overview of a different aspect of climate change!

Your Instructors

Maxx Diley, Director, Climate Prediction and Adaptation, World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
.Prior to joining WMO, Maxx worked at United Nations Development Programme, International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) at Columbia University, World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development's Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance. He has designed, managed and contributed to disaster and risk management programmes in Africa, Latin America and Asia, and has written numerous papers on disaster reduction and climate-related topics.

Motsomi Maletjane, Team Leader, LDC Unit, National Adaptation Plans and Policy, Adaptation Programme, UNFCCC Secretariat. He works on matters relating to LDCs under the Convention and supports the work of the Least Developed Countries Expert Group on the national adaptation programmes of action (NAPAs), the national adaptation plans (NAPs) and the LDC work programme. Prior to joining the Secretariat, Motsomi worked for the Government of Lesotho, supporting various areas of climate-related work.

Miguel Naranjo,Programme Officer, Global Climate Action, UNFCCC Secretariat. He worked as a process engineer and an environmental supervisor for a transnational corporation and later joined the climate change team of UN Environment in the regional office for Latin America and the Caribbean. He joined the UN Climate Change Secretariat in 2011, where he has focused on capacity building for mitigation and carbon market mechanisms, and promoting climate action among the private sector and other stakeholders to meet the goals of the Paris Agreements and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Steven Stone, Chief of Resources and Markets Branch, UN Environment

. Steven holds a PhD in Resource Economics from Cornell University and has more than 20 years of professional experience in environmental and natural resource management. As Chief of Branch, Steven directs a team dedicated to furthering the knowledge base, outreach and support to countries on environmental and resource economics as key components of economic, trade and investment policy.

Dr. Martin Frick, Senior Director, Policy and Programme Coordination, UNFCCC Secretariat

. As Senior Director, Martin Frick oversees UNFCCC’s work supporting the implementation of the Paris Agreement and climate action.  He previously served as Director for Climate Change at UNFAO. He was the German representative for human rights and humanitarian affairs at the UN General Assembly and served as the European Union’s lead negotiator in the establishment of the UN Human Rights Council.

Niclas Svenningsen, Manager, Global Climate Action, UNFCCC Secretariat

. He is responsible for developing and strengthening approaches and strategies for catalyzing climate action under, and in addition to, activities mandated by UNFCCC. He previously worked with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) where he was in charge of the climate-neutral strategy of the UN system, as well as for the implementation of UNEP’s programmes for sustainable buildings, urban development, and sustainable procurement.

Three Levels of Climate Fitness

You can learn according to your own needs, interests and time availability. But remember! – the time and efforts you put in the course will correspond to your climate abilities!

Three levels of climate learning and corresponding CLIMATE FITNESS can be obtained via the course:

Level 1: You know climate – Watch all the video and complete all quizzes.

Level 2: You can teach climate – Watch all the videos and complete the lessons and quizzes.

Level 3: You can act climate – Watch all the videos and complete the lessons, activities and quizzes.

Get your Certificate

Once you have taken obtained a passing grade of 70% or more to all quizzes you qualify for a certificate of completion from the course. Be aware that you only have up to 5 attempts per quiz.

Your Certificate will become automatically available to download under the tap “Certification” on the main course page.

Partners

Special thanks to all UN CC:Learn Partners for the development of this course!

UN CC:Learn participated in the first session ever dedicated to this topic during the Annual Conference of the European Association for International Education (EAIE), held from 11 to 14 September 2018 in Geneva, Switzerland.

In order to raise awareness of the importance of promoting climate change learning, UN CC:Learn participated in the first session ever dedicated to this topic during the Annual Conference of the European Association for International Education (EAIE), held from 11 to 14 September 2018, in Geneva, Switzerland. The conference, which is Europe’s largest international conference on international education and is now in its 30th edition, gathered over 5,000 professionals from universities in 95 countries.

https://www.eaie.org/geneva.html

The session, titled “The way forward – universities facing and addressing climate change”, allowed participants to reflect on how to integrate climate change into higher education. As one the speakers, Ms. Cristina Rekakavas, UN CC:Learn Secretariat, emphasized that nobody can fix problems that he/she does not understand – therefore, it is essential to build knowledge and skills in order to effectively address climate change. Ms. Rekakavas then presented areas in which UN CC:Learn collaborates with national/regional learning institutions to up-scale the reach and sustainability of climate change education, including:

  • Analyzing the impact of leaning activities and how they contribute to shifting behaviors and transitioning to greener and more resilient societies;
  • Developing and disseminating learning resources on climate change, as those hosted on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform;
  • Promoting youth exchanges on climate change;
  • Supporting the implementation of learning actions around the world.

After a first segment featuring 3 presentations, participants were invited to discuss in groups and identify concrete steps they could advance in their own institutions. By engaging with international educational networks, UN CC:Learn aims at supporting the growth of a critical mass of individuals around the world that have the necessary knowledge and skills to be able to take informed decisions and concrete actions to address climate change.