The Partnership for Action on Green Economy has launched a series of global e-learning products that address key policy issues central to the green recovery debate. The six online courses are free, self-paced, and can act as an invaluable building block as countries plan their economic responses to COVID-19—serving to inform and shape the public policy debate around green economic reform.

Now is the Time to Build Back Green

Five UN Agencies Tap Expertise for Courses Aimed at Green Economic Recovery

UN Environment ProgrammeInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN International Development Organization and UN Institute of Training and Research — under the auspices of PAGE, have launched a global learning campaign aimed at fostering a wide-reaching green economic recovery post-COVID-19. The online courses, developed through agency collaboration, are individual and self-paced and can serve to directly address capacity gaps in developing and implementing policies central to achieving green, inclusive growth.

With economic investment into national recovery packages estimated to reach up to US$ 20 trillion over the next 18 months, informed recovery decisions are crucial. Targeting varying starting points and thematic focuses, the courses aim to equip users with the necessary knowledge and skills to support the systematic integration of environmental sustainability in national economic recovery strategies and stimulus packages, sectoral programmes and policy reforms, as well as strengthen collective national ownership of job-rich green economic recovery efforts.

Overall, this concerted effort promotes the benefits of a long-term strategy to align economic recovery with SDGs and 1.5 degree target for climate change. As leaders are looking towards the future, strong learning resources can become the crux for the future we want.

The courses are available to anyone and the range of topics includes green economy, fiscal reforms, trade, green industrial policy, green economy indicators, and sustainable finance.  All of the courses, which are free and self-paced, will be available on the UN CC:Learn Platform, which has almost ½ million registered users worldwide.

Follow the Partnership for Action on Green Economy’s green recovery journey:

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Ethiopia has launched a new national climate change education strategy that seeks to create environmentally conscious citizens through turning, by 2030, every school in the country into champions for building a climate-resilient green economy.

Ethiopia has launched a new national climate change education strategy that seeks to create environmentally conscious citizens through turning, by 2030, every school in the country into champions for building a climate resilient green economy.

Climate change is a living threat to Ethiopia and it was in response to this threat that the Government of Ethiopia developed the Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy (CRGE) in 2012.

UN CC:Learn initiative in Ethiopia was launched in September 2016 and covers the period from 2017 to 2030. The initiative is not only demand-driven and country-owned, but it’s aligned with the national normative frameworks including the CRGE, the Growth and Transformation plan, as well as education sector policy.

By 2020, the new strategy will enhance the level of integration of climate change education into the formal education system so that schools have greater and more meaningful involvement in the implementation of the CRGE.

Lead government agencies for implementing, monitoring and assessment of the strategy and priority actions are the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MEFCC) and the Ministry of Education (MoE). The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) supported the development of the strategy and priority actions as well as the stakeholder consultations to ensure national buy-in.

Key intervention areas of the first cycle of the CCE Strategy (2017-2020) include:

  • facilitate setting up of an enabling policy and institutional frameworks at national and sub-national levels with a view to fostering sustainable climate change learning;
  • enhance the level of integration of climate change education in the curricula of the formal education system of Ethiopia;
  • support extra-curricular activities and further the integration of CCE among formal, non-formal and informal education systems.

Other actions prioritized for 2017 include the development of framework document for curricular revision, which will be followed by the production and dissemination of complementary climate change learning resources and teachers’ orientations targeting both primary and secondary education levels.

For further information regarding the Climate Change Education Strategy of Ethiopia 2017-2020, click here

Green industrial policies aim to increase productivity, boost competitiveness, and promote growth, while also promoting social and environmental goals. This advanced course introduces participants to conceptual tools and examples, and learning materials to apply in their own activities.

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  • Green Economy

Self-paced course

30 hours hours

Welcome

Industrial policy — or strategic government measures that aim to promote new economic sectors and accelerate structural change — has traditionally been employed to enhance productivity, boost competitiveness, and promote economic growth. Today, green industrial policy follows this same approach of state-driven structural change while also promoting broader social and environmental goals.

By drawing from recent examples of green industrial policy, countries can generate the benefits of traditional industrial policy while accelerating the shift away from carbon-intensive industrial production to more sustainable models, thus advancing the transition towards a green economy while reducing the numerous environmental risks lying ahead.

The course is designed to advance learning on green industrial policy at a high technical level and serves two types of users. First, the course provides individual learners with the knowledge and conceptual tools to grasp and shape the global debate on modernizing the industrial basis of our economies. Secondly, lecturers and instructors are encouraged to use the course materials and apply them within their instructional activities, for example by integrating them into existing curricula and/or programmes.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

The course’s materials are curated to help achieve the following learning objectives:

  • Explain the rationale for advancing green industry
  • Differentiate the main concepts related to green industrial policy
  • Highlight relevant empirical evidence in support of policy reform
  • Distinguish policy instruments to foster structural change
  • Appraise strategic considerations during policy design, implementation and evaluation
  • Outline the relationship between green industrial policy and trade

Course structure at a glance

The course offers a wide panorama of the main conceptual and empirical considerations within the current global green industrial policy debate along five modules, each addressing a specific set of questions:

  1. Industrial policy: Challenges and opportunities
  2. Green industrial policy: Conceptual foundations
  3. Strategic development of green industrial policy
  4. Green industrial policy instruments
  5. Green industrial policy and trade

Get your certificate!

Users who take the stand-alone online course obtain a Certificate of Completion upon passing the final quiz. Once the certification criteria are met, users can download the certificate under the “Certification” tab.

Partners

Responding to the need for building a critical mass of change agents, the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), United Nations Industrial Development Organisation (UNIDO) and United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) developed this course under the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE).

Disclaimer

The materials contained in this course may be reproduced in whole or in part and in any form for educational or non-profit purposes without special permission from the copyright holder, provided acknowledgment of the source is made. No use of these materials may be made for resale or for any other commercial purpose whatsoever without prior permission in writing from the PAGE Secretariat.

Sustainable development in the African continent faces challenges related to consumption and production. This course introduces participants to key sectors, such as energy and agriculture, as well as policies and international frameworks to foster more sustainable consumption and production patterns.

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  • Finance
  • Green Economy

Self-paced course

6 hours hours

Welcome!

In this course, we will go on a journey to Africa and and discuss what are the challenges and outlooks for sustainable development on the continent. The course introduces you to the key approaches, policies and international frameworks that aim to unlock more sustainable patterns of consumption and production (SCP).

We will cover a number of aspects and various thematic areas: from energy efficiency – to climate-smart agriculture, from SCP tools, policies and international agreements – to behavioral change of individuals.

Our path consists of five modules, each divided into several lessons. For more information on the course structure, methodology, learning objectives and completion requirements, please download the course syllabus. If you encounter any technical difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What you will learn

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Define the concept of SCP and explain its value for Africa and globally
  • Distinguish key elements of effective policies for SCP
  • Discuss how can SCP be advanced specific sectors and areas
  • Explain the role of consumers and individual choices for SCP
  • Identify global and regional initiatives that promote SCP

The course at a glance

  • Module 1

    Introduction to SCP: Definition, Rationale and Fundamentals

  • Module 2

    Designing and Implementing National SCP Policies and Action Plans

  • Module 3

    Applying Policies for Sustainable Production: Addressing the Supply Side

  • Module 4

    Applying Policies for Sustainable Consumption: Addressing the Demand Side

  • Module 5

    International and Regional Collaboration to Achieve SCP

Patrick Mwesigye<br /> Regional Coordinator, Resource Efficiency and Sustainable Consumption and Production (SCP), Regional Office for Africa, UN Environment

Alice Kaudia<br /> Co-Founder and Executive Director, Eco entrepreneurs Ltd., Former Environment Secretary, Ministry of Environment, Natural Resources and Regional Development Authorities, KENYA, and Co-Chair: Green Growth Knowledge Platform (GGKP)

Jane Nyakang’o<br /> Director, Kenya National Cleaner Production Centre (KNCPC) and President, African Round Table on Sustainable Consumption and Production (ARSCP)

Charles Arden-Clarke<br /> Head, 10YFP Secretariat, Sustainable Lifestyles, Cities and Industry Branch, UN Environment

Dirk Wagener<br /> Coordinator, Resource Efficiency & Sustainable Consumption and Production, UN Environment

Methodology

The course is adapted for adults and particularly suitable for anyone working (or interested in working) in the field of sustainability, climate change, resource efficiency, rural or urban development, community engagement, policy development, training and capacity development, or international cooperation.

Participants are provided with the opportunity to learn through various experiences: absorb (read and watch); interact (lessons); and reflect (quizzes and exercises).

To successfully complete the course and gain a certificate of completion, participants have to obtain a passing grade of 70% or above to all 5 assessment quizzes (3 attempts are allowed for each quiz).

 

Special thanks to the UN Environment and the SWITCH Africa Green project, funded by the European Parliament, for supporting the development and delivery of this course.

Applying green economy indicator methodologies requires policymakers to be trained to use them in their respective national contexts. This course introduces these indicators and explains the use of methodologies for selecting and applying them, with a focus on those set by PAGE.

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  • Green Economy

Self-paced course

2 hours hours

Welcome

The application of green economy indicator methodologies, including those developed under the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE), often requires policymakers to be trained in applying the methodologies within their national contexts. Indeed, countries require training in developing tailored and flexible national indicator frameworks that respond to their development priorities and statistical capacities and aids in their efforts in monitoring the progress towards green economy.

This course is meant to introduce the concept of indicators to support policymaking for an Inclusive Green Economy (IGE) and to illustrate the use of methodologies for selecting and applying indicators. It seeks to contribute to the capacity of countries to choose indicators for IGE relevant to their country contexts, particularly in light of the pursuit of the Sustainable Development Goals.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

This course explains how indicators can support policymaking in measuring progress toward an Inclusive Green Economy. It reviews conceptual frameworks to guide countries in the selection of indicators and describes various approaches to indicator measurement. Finally, the course addresses the process of indicator selection and reviews the indicator frameworks used by some international organizations.

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the role and value of Green Economy indicator frameworks and their relation to improved green economy policymaking
  • Outline Green Economy indicator frameworks and their linkages with the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)
  • Analyse the process of prioritizing and selecting indicators and how this can be incorporated into a national Green Economy monitoring framework

The course at a glance

The course is self-paced and structured into four lessons:

  1. Introduction to concepts
  2. Choosing appropriate frameworks for green economy (GE) indicators
  3. Approaches to measurement
  4. Selecting green economy indicators

Each lesson takes approximately 30 minutes to complete. A downloadable glossary is available to help you with the relevant concepts and technical terms that are used in the course (please make sure you download it before starting the course).

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

The course has been developed under the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE), in collaboration with the International Training Centre of the International Labour Organization (ITCILO).

Trade can power a greener economic recovery from the pandemic. Global demand for environmental goods and services is set to rise, as countries roll out rescue packages with large provisions for climate-friendly solutions. This course introduces participants to key approaches to harness green trade opportunities.

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  • Green Economy

Self-paced course

2 hours hours

Welcome

World trade patterns show that while many developing countries are now playing an increasing role in trade, many other—and particularly least developed countries who account for less than 1% of all global trade—remain stranded on the margins. Still heavily reliant on natural resource-based products and raw materials for their exports, these countries are highly vulnerable to economic and environmental shocks.

The transition to an inclusive green economy represents many significant opportunities. By harnessing the increasing global demand for environmental goods and services, as well as consumer demand for more sustainable products, countries can diversify their economies, reduce their commodity dependence and boost their competitiveness. Thus, societies promote long-term, sustainable development while also strengthening their capacity to tackle the manifold environmental challenges lying ahead.

Trade can also power a green economic recovery from COVID-19. Global demand for environmental goods and services is expected to rise as countries roll out economic stimuli with larger earmarks for climate-friendly solutions. While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the various approaches that may be taken to harness green trade opportunities.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Outline the evolution of legal and governance frameworks underpinning the trade and green economy interface
  • Identify perceived challenges and potential opportunities related to trade in the transition to a green economy
  • Describe enabling policy conditions to foster green trade practices
  • Highlight sectoral case studies of green trade in action

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of the policy instruments and enabling conditions needed for countries to advance the green economy transition via green trade, and vice-versa. It contains four lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The trade and environment interface
  2. Perceived tensions and synergies between trade liberalization and the green economy
  3. Enabling conditions and policy design for green trade
  4. Seizing sectoral opportunities

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Green fiscal policies can help make public expenditures more efficient. This is key as the world strives to ‘build back better’ after the COVID-19 pandemic. This course introduces participants to the fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to transition to a green economy.

Enroll
  • Green Economy

Self-paced course

2 hours hours

Welcome

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed many fragilities of our economies and deepened existing inequalities and imbalances. However, long before the pandemic hit nations across the world, many economies were marked by harmful and inefficient use of public and private resources, reinforcing environmental degradation, biodiversity loss, global warming and vulnerabilities linked to health and social exclusion. In the wake of the health and economic crisis, citizens are increasingly demanding a departure from business-as-usual approaches in favour of truly innovative and green policies. Similarly, many governments recognize that the transformative potential of this circumstance must not be wasted.

Greening recovery efforts can help nations build forward better after the pandemic to increase the well-being of people and resilience of countries to future crises. Green fiscal policies in particular can play a key role in countries’ recovery efforts by removing inefficiencies in public expenditures and raising additional fiscal revenues which can be directed towards immediate COVID-19 relief measures while supporting longer-term investments.  While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the green fiscal policy tools and approaches to foster a more sustainable future

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for greater use of green fiscal policy
  • List different fiscal instruments to promote desirable economic, social and environmental outcomes
  • Describe the key stages of the policy cycle
  • Highlight the main opportunities and challenges presented by the energy, transport and waste management sectors
  • Outline how international collaboration enhances fiscal policy action taken at the national level

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to advance the green economy transition. It contains five lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The need for green fiscal policy
  2. Fiscal instruments for greening the economy
  3. Effective strategies for fiscal reform
  4. Applying green fiscal policy in key sectors
  5. Collaborating for impact

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Have you ever thought about how powerful teams come together? What are the odds that  two talented individuals from different places and different backgrounds cross paths and start working on the same issues? Professor Sanoussi Atta grew up in Niger. After studying Agricultural Engineering, he became a doctor in Biological Sciences. Elise Kaba is from Burkina Faso. She pursued her studies in Computer Science and worked her way towards a master’s degree in Physics. For the greater part of their lives, Elisa and Sanoussi walked different paths. Little did they know that something bigger than themselves would connect them, something that for years it was just a shared notion of space but that later would become the focus of their careers: the Sahel.

Located in West Africa, just below the Sahara Desert, this region of arid land that stretches from Senegal to Chad is a cultural and historical shoreline between the Middle East and sub-Saharan Africa. Since antiquity it has been the arena of interaction between Arabic, Islamic and nomadic cultures from the north, and indigenous and traditional cultures from the south. For these reasons, the Sahel has a powerful but also uneasy atmosphere. Over the decades, this has been a place of growing ethno-religious tensions, political instability, and poverty, aggravated by the inherited hardships of such dry environments. To make matters even more concerning, the region is particularly vulnerable to climate change. While the prospects are of increased temperatures globally, in the Sahel temperatures are rising 1.5 times faster than the global average, meaning that in the coming decades the region will most likely be defined by extreme weather occurrences. Addressing such impacts and adapting to the changes are of critical importance of the Sahel and this is where Prof. Sanoussi and Elise Kaba’s paths have crossed.

Prof. Sanoussi is Head of the Training and Research Department at the AGRHYMET Regional Centre (CRA*), a specialized institution of the Permanent Inter-State Committee for Drought Control in the Sahel (CILSS*) located in Niamey, Niger.  His department is dedicated to the development and delivery of training and information on food and nutritional security, water management, climate change and the fight against desertification. Elise oversees the centre’s distance learning platform. Both are expert trainers working to prepare end equip professionals with the knowledge and skills required to contribute to a better future in the Sahel. But to do so at scale, the duo realized it was necessary to strengthen its learning system. “We knew it would be useful to move towards online courses and make the best of current technologies to increase our reach, training the greatest number of people possible in our countries and also to reduce costs”, Prof. Sanoussi and Elise explain. What they needed was a little technical guidance, which they got through the One UN Climate Change Learning Partnership (UN CC:Learn).

Through its West African Hub, UN CC:Learn delivered a Training of Trainers (ToT) to the AGRHYMET team on “How to Develop, Deliver and Evaluate Effective e-Learning”. The training was specifically tailored to AGRHYMET’s needs, supporting them in creating e-learning modules for their face-to-face master’s degree on climate change. “During the workshop, we learned the principles and methods for creating online courses and we had the chance to experiment, by applying the different steps in the process of developing an effective e-learning pilot product”, they recall, adding that the group exercises also allowed them to practice on existing course modules delivered at the Centre.

After the training, the team lost little time in putting what they had learned into practice with their main course module: Integrating Climate Change Policies. “This course was originally delivered in a face-to-face setting and the material was all in PowerPoint format. So, we used what we learned during the workshop to transform it into an e-learning course”, said the dynamic duo, with some pride. Now, Prof. Sanoussi and Elise are prepared to share what they have learned. “We have mastered the development of e-learning courses and we are committed to support and train our colleagues to do the same” they said, with some confidence that this episode will leave a meaningful legacy at AGRHYMET. “We are driven to provide high-quality adult education and develop the centre’s diploma training courses for distance learning, reaching a larger number of participants in the CILSS countries and Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS)”.

UN CC:Learn is excited to see what new upcoming learning solutions will be developed by these two climate champions and their teams.

On the 26th and 27th of February 2020, the country took concrete steps towards finalizing its National Climate Change Learning Strategy.

Zambia is committed to educating its communities on climate change. On the 26th and 27th of February 2020 the country took concrete steps towards finalising its National Climate Change Learning Strategy. A two-day workshop was organized by the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources (MLNR), with support from Zambia Environmental Agency (ZEMA), Zambia Climate Change Network (ZCCN), UNDP and UN CC:Learn, and took place in Chisamba, a small town near the capital Lusaka.

The event brought together representatives from several ministries, civil society, media and the private sector. For two days, they engaged in activities and discussions focusing ultimately on developing an Action Plan for the next five years (2020 – 2025) to support the country in its aims to strengthen individual and institutional capacities for NDC and NAP implementation.

The fruitful partnership between the Ministry of Lands and Natural Resources, ZEMA and ZCCN leading the National Climate Change Learning Strategy development process has highlighted the importance of raising awareness about climate change within the local communicates, given the threats that this poses to Zambia.

Following the launch of the project in July 2019, a background report and learning needs assessment were completed and these findings informed the discussions on the Action Plan as well as identifying the priority actions to be immediately implemented.  The Strategic Objectives of the strategy will focus on:

  • Awareness-raising: the use of innovative ways of communicating climate change to ensure that all segments of the communities have access to climate change information;
  • Capacity building: the need to not only target individuals but also, strengthen institutional capacities to implement climate change programmes; and
  • Mainstreaming of climate change into national curricula: to take advantage of the existing political will on integrating climate change learning into national curricula.

Moving forward the input received from the workshop will be consolidated into the first draft of the National Climate Change Learning strategy to be shared with stakeholders for review in March 2020.  Two priority activities have already been identified to be immediately implemented as the strategy is  being finalised. The two priority areas include the training of journalists on reporting about climate change; awareness raising campaigns on climate smart agriculture projects; and additional Youth Climate Dialogues for Zambian students.

The UN CC:Learn project in Zambia started in 2019, and aims to strengthen learning and skills development to address climate change in the country. The project has a strong knowledge and regional experience sharing focus, building on the experience of Malawi and Zimbabwe.

Kenya is on track to teaching children and teenagers about climate change and its related issues.

In 2018, the Ministry of Environment and Forestry officially joined the One UN Climate Change Learning Partnership (UN CC:Learn) in a bid to strengthen Kenya’s human resources and skills to advance the national climate change agenda. This set off a process to develop the National Climate Change Learning Strategy led by the Climate Change Directorate under the Ministry of Environment and Forestry, in partnership with UN CC:Learn, FAO Kenya, Kenya Climate Change Working Group, and the Ministry of Education. The Climate Change Learning Strategy seeks to systematically analyse existing policies and initiatives around climate change learning, assess the needs and capacities of national institutions to deliver climate change learning, and create strategic entry points for measurable and impactful actions that will enhance individual, institutional and systemic capacity on climate change. The result would be a citizenry that drives a low emission, climate-resilient development pathway.

The strategy development process kicked off with the development of the Background Report on National Climate Change Priorities and Relevant Capacity Development Goals and Plans in Kenya. The report reviews existing policies and frameworks on climate change, analyses the initiatives implemented by various actors in the climate change learning space, note the gaps, and provides recommendations for the Strategy. On 15th June 2020, the Climate Change Directorate convened the first virtual meeting with critical stakeholders from government, civil society, academic institutions, private sector, and development partners to review and validate the Background Report. It was a rich exchange with substantive input from participants on the key outcomes of the report, from the challenges experienced in climate change learning in the formal, non-formal, and informal sectors of education and training to subsequent interventions that the Strategy could address.The Report highlights the Climate Change Act of 2016 which places responsibility on national and county governments to address climate change and facilitate capacity development. National institutions like the Kenya School of Government are working with various partners to build the capacity of county government officials to mainstream climate change into local development planning and getting people at the local level actively engaged in climate change learning while at the same time building their resilience.

Representatives from institutions of higher learning, including the Commission on University Education, shared insights concerning the decreasing number of students in public universities enrolling in climate change and food security-related courses over time, despite these bring national priority areas for sustainable development. Reflections from The University of Nairobi’s Institute for Climate Change Adaptation that has adopted a trans-disciplinary approach towards mainstreaming climate change into the curricula see climate change as a complex societal issue and thus the need for cross-disciplinary actions to integrate climate change in courses from undergraduate level. Non-formal networks like high school Water Clubs involving young learners actively in practical climate change learning applications have also proven effective.

COVID-19, being the very big elephant in the room, has shifted business as usual with UNESCO reporting over 60% of students worldwide disrupted from school. As countries begin to forge the new normal, a key consideration for the Strategy would be the support towards recovery and strengthening virtual learning, focusing on key issues like climate change that is available to all learners. UN CC:Learn offers a wide variety of e-learning courses on climate change and provides partner countries the opportunity to access these resources. The Kenya Institute of Curriculum Development (KICD), Ministry of Education, and the Ministry of Environment and Forestry have embarked on preparing guidelines to mainstream climate change into the curriculum in consultation with key stakeholders.

In Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) Institutions, the TVET Authority highlighted ongoing efforts to green TVET institutions as highlighted in the Report. Although there have been challenges that have slowed progress, the Authority is seeking to find solutions towards greening the TVET curriculum that the Strategy can incorporate, including accreditation and certification of climate change courses in TVETs.

Pursuant to the Leave No One Behind principle of the 2030 Sustainable Development Agenda, participants reflected on the importance of ensuring that vulnerable groups including women, youth, the elderly, persons with disabilities, marginalized communities, and indigenous groups are part and parcel of the Strategy. The National Gender and Equality Commission (NGEC) highlighted the significance of addressing the unique socio-cultural challenges facing women and girls in the context of climate change learning. The Climate-Smart Agriculture Youth Network (CSA-YN) recognized the importance of going beyond merely mentioning the youth as key actors, but having them contribute to important processes such as the Learning Strategy. Globally and at the local level, the youth are bringing leaders to task on addressing the climate crisis and as such, are central towards climate change learning. The Mainyoito Pastoralists Integrated Development Organization (MPIDO) noted that Kenya has the opportunity to tap into indigenous traditional knowledge through informal education networks at the community level and integrate it into climate change learning especially for communities living in the frontlines of the climate crisis.

SDG 17 calls for inclusive partnerships at all levels to drive sustainable development. For example, the Kenya Private Sector Alliance (KEPSA) has played an important role in mainstreaming climate change into business in the pursuit of a green economy and noted the need to capacitate Small and Medium Enterprises (SMEs) to deal with climate change. Development Partners such as FAO have partnered with the Media Council of Kenya to build the capacity of journalists in responsible and accurate climate change reporting. Collaboration with researchers and academics can positively influence national development through the provision of factual information and innovative approaches to complex challenges like climate change. The Background Report notes these partnerships as vital in the achievement of a holistic climate change learning strategy.

As Kenya gears up for the next steps of the strategy development process, the anticipation of a strategic, coordinated approach to climate change learning is palpable. With the great strides Kenya has already made at the national and global levels to address the climate crisis, the National Climate Change Learning Strategy will add value to these efforts by creating a sustainable, gender-balanced human resource base to address climate change.