Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. It is now available in English, Spanish and French.

Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. The course was launched at the at the sixth GEF Assembly taking place in Danang, Viet Nam.

This self-paced free course has been developed by UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

“The Gender and Environment e-course is the first of its kind and it will be a valuable resource for the environmental community in its efforts to be more gender responsive. This course will also help raise awareness and build capacity to implement GEF’s new policy on Gender Equality” said Francoise Clottes, GEF Director of Strategy and Operations.

“UNDP recognizes the transformative potential of gender equality to advance environmental sustainability. The course is an exciting opportunity to broaden understanding of the important links between gender and environment and offers practical tools, evidence and examples to mainstream gender in key environmental sectors.” said Adriana Dinu, Executive Coordinator, UNDP Global Environmental Finance.

“GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) is delighted to have led and facilitated the development of this useful course with all the partners. We are also excited to feature concrete SGP project examples where local communities have implemented innovative gender responsive projects and produced multiple benefits on both environment and livelihoods.” stated Yoko Watanabe, Global Manager, GEF Small Grants Programme.

The course allows learners to get a better understanding of the linkages between gender equality, women’s empowerment and environmental sustainability. It highlights how gender-responsive policies and projects support environmental outcomes.

This new e-learning resource is comprised of the following 6 modules:

  1. Gender & Environment (introductory module)
  2. Gender & Biodiversity
  3. Gender & Climate Change
  4. Gender & Land Degradation
  5. Gender & International Waters
  6. Gender & Chemicals and Waste

Each module takes around 1-1.5 hours to complete and includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises/reflection points, key messages and references to additional resources. A quiz at the end of each module allows participants to measure the achievement of the learning objectives.

Take up the course today: English, Spanish and French.

Audrey Ingram Roberts, Executive Director of Source Development Consultants in Nassau, Bahamas, leads her firm with a clear objective: to deliver exceptional Human Resources Development services to facilitate sustainable change, particularly in the areas of organizational development, gender-responsive management systems, and strategic planning.

Ms. Roberts (middle) with two Information and Communications officers of the Bahamas Agriculture & Marine Science Institute (BAMSI). Their motto is ‘GROW WITH US.’ Website: BAMSIBahamas.com. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Early in her career, Audrey worked at the Bureau of Women’s Affairs in Jamaica, which was set up in 1975, and the first of its kind in the Caribbean region. This experience, she says, was a “profoundly significant marker” in her career.

Her work as Rural Coordinator and later as a Project Development Officer gave Audrey an insider’s look to the similarities and differences that women experience in rural and urban settings. Whether it be at a farm or a law firm, women face similar gender-based biases. For Audrey, empowering women spawned in her a commitment to life-long learning.

It started with empowering the staff through personal awareness training and professional development. We extended this training into a wider constituency, to all the women of Jamaica.

Later on, Audrey participated in seminars and events that prepared her for her role in assisting the National Planning Institute of Jamaica to develop the Government’s first Five Year Plan for Women.

On the importance of learning

Last year, Audrey, who is a natural networker, found out about the National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture (NAP-Ag MOOC) through the Coordinator of the Caribbean Women’s Network, who is always on the lookout for opportunities that might interest members and encourages them to keep learning.

The onions and veggies are products of BAMSI or produced by entrepreneurs trained at BAMSI. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

She enrolled in the NAP-Ag MOOC for many reasons, including the fact that The Bahamas’ fragile ecosystems have been disturbed or even destroyed by development on several islands. From 1990 to 2016, The Bahamas has weathered 16 hurricanes, which are characteristically different, increasingly more intense and devastating. “Hurricane Joaquin (2015) and Hurricane Matthew (2016) highlight the vulnerability of our archipelago to climate events,” Audrey explains to us.

Schoolchildren sampling agro-processed items. Many schoolchildren attended, mostly girls. A few students spoke at the open mike session about their interest in agriculture and are proud of their school farm gardens because they can eat what they grow. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Her second reason for taking the NAP-Ag MOOC relates directly to her professional role.

As a gender specialist, it is essential to know how to mainstream gender into adaptation planning. Gender-responsive climate change adaptation planning is, for me, the strength of the course. This part of the course deserves an A+ in its delivery, content, concepts and all aspects of skill building.

Audrey says, as far as she is aware there is not a strategic NAP or NAP-Ag for the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. “This became my most compelling reason for taking the course with my eye on certification,” she states.

The NAP-Ag is a new, emerging frontier. “Like all frontiers, it is exciting and challenging. More so if there is no NAP process occurring in the country,” she adds.

Audrey enjoyed the course and found that it inspired a sense of the opportunities in climate change and “dispelled anxiety” about the crisis of climate change by showing what could be done through effective planning.

“The NAP-Ag course has strengthened my capability as a consultant at a time when my country and region need the application of these transformative skills to the rapidly emerging challenges. And it has enhanced my role as an activist in the Caribbean women’s movement.”

Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Do you want to learn more about Audrey’s work? Some of her publications include:

  • Article on Gender Issues in The Bahamas in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Women’s Issues Worldwide: North America and the Caribbean, Ed. Cheryl Toronto Kalny, Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut & London 2003
  • A Vision for Gender and Development Cooperation, Caribbean Perspectives — an article in A Vision for Gender and Development, the Outcome of an Expert Group Workshop, Stockholm, published by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Stockholm, Sweden 1996.

 

“If you are not willing to learn, no one can help you. If you are determined to learn, no one can stop you.”

Mariel interacting with the participants of the Second Gastronomic Business Round. Here she is advising two producers. /©Wilder Córdova.

This inspirational quote kept Mariel Bueno, a trained Agroindustrial Engineer from Cochabamba, Bolivia, motivated to continue learning, and lead her to discover a new truly fulfilling career path.

Mariel graduated from Agroindustrial Engineering with excellence. Equipped with a door-opening diploma, she began her career in agribusiness. She gained firsthand experience and technical skills in logistics, agro-productive chains, and supply and demand of agri-food products. She had the opportunity to interact with many of the key industry stakeholders, producers from different regions, executives, and entrepreneurs in the agri-food sector.

And yet, despite her quick progress up the career ladder, she soon started questioning herself, her work and her contribution to the world.

“From an early age, I immersed myself in two realities of which I learned a lot: the countryside and the city, the production of food and the food industry, small farmers, peasants and merchants, scarcity and abundance. This is how I grew up, appreciating each world with its differences.”

The team at the end of the Sixth National Agribusiness Wheel “Conecta”. /©Fundación Valles

Mariel’s childhood memories drew her back to the countryside, where she ventured into the world of dairy products with a private company. But even there she could not find an answer and fulfillment. Feeling lost again, she was determined to search and learn.

Despite everything I was living, I decided to continue learning. I firmly believe that we always have to go ahead and make our existence worthwhile. I took several courses online and the light finally came through the NAP-Ag MOOC.”

Mariel helping participants at the Sixth National Agribusiness Wheel “Conecta”. /©Fundación Valles

This is how Mariel discovered the Massive Open Online Course on National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture (NAP-Ag MOOC) on UN CC:e-Learn platform. Throughout the course, she learned about adaptation planning, food security and she focused on her own country for the peer assessment project. Bolivia is experiencing its worst water crisis in the last 25 years and is vulnerable to droughts and pollution of rivers. Mariel chose the province of Capinota, previously known for its vast potential for productive diversity, which was recently declared as “Zone of Natural Disaster.”

“At the beginning, it seems that it [the MOOC] will give you some great new ideas about climate change, the importance of adaptation plans, and agriculture for food security. However, in the end, beyond increasing your awareness and knowledge about these issues, it opens your mind and a little bit, your heart.”

Mariel at the Second Gastronomic Business Round. /©Wilder Córdova.

Mariel learned a lot from the course. But beyond that, she actively transformed the theory into her new reality. By taking the NAP-Ag MOOC, it became clear to her that she would like to support her community in adapting to severe changes in the climate, help farmers develop new skills and use better technologies and advocate for policies that strengthen the productive sector.

This course allowed me to find my way, to define what I want to do the rest of my days”, Mariel reflects. “ I know it is not too late to do something for Capinota, Bolivia or the world. But, I also know that there is still a lot of work to be done,” she says after taking the NAP-Ag MOOC.

Currently, Mariel and her mother work at their own urban garden Huerto Urbano Agroecológico “LaVictoria.” They produce their own food, and most of the vegetables and spices that their family consumes, such as tomatoes, oregano, celery, parsley, peppermint, pumpkin, etc, come directly from their garden. The mom-daughter duo also started the production of seedlings (eco-gardening, nursery), which they sell at local fairs. They are also planning to open an agro-ecological store at their house to sell local farmers to produce and promote agro-ecological farming, organic products and local consumption.

A plant that Mariel and her mother grow in their urban garden. /©Mariel Bueno

Mariel is also a full-time graduate student. She earned a half fee scholarship for a graduate program called, “Master of Science in Geoinformation and Earth Observation,” in part, due to her innate passion for learning. Above all, she has her mindset to cooperate in the sustainable development of her surroundings.

Mariel calls for more involvement of national institutions to provide agricultural education programs, which could provide education to farmers to support the development of technical capacities, gender analysis, and sustainable agricultural food cooperatives.

You can support Mariel and her projects! Visit:

Gender and the environment are deeply connected. Understanding this connection can help bring benefits to societies and ecosystems. This course explains why promoting gender equality and women’s empowerment helps deliver better environmental outcomes, and how to put this into practice.

Enroll
  • Gender
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

6 hours

Welcome!

The course will help you better understand the linkages between gender and the environment. It will provide you with the knowledge and tools to mainstream gender, and to be an effective change-maker for sustainable development. It will also give you facts and figures, and a better understanding of the global international frameworks related to gender and environment.

It is a “one-stop-shop” for information and illustrations on gender dimensions linked to biodiversity, climate change, land degradation, international waters, and chemicals and waste. All you need to know about gender and the environment!

If you face any issue with accessing or going through our courses please access our help page.

What will you learn?

  • What are the links between gender equality and environmental sustainability?
  • Which global environmental frameworks include gender?
  • How can gender-responsive policies and projects support environmental outcomes?
  • Discover what you can do to promote gender equality and women’s empowerment in biodiversity, climate change, land degradation, international waters, chemicals and waste.

The course at a glance

The course is divided into six modules covering the following areas:

  1. Introduction;
  2. Climate Change;
  3. International Waters;
  4. Biodiversity;
  5. Land Degradation;
  6. Chemicals and Waste.

Each module takes an average of 1 hour to complete. (*The module 5 and 6 will be coming soon).

Who is this course for?

  • Someone curious and interested to learn more about how efforts to address environmental degradation and promote gender equality can be mutually supportive.
  • A specialist working on biodiversity, climate change, land degradation, international waters, chemicals and waste.
  • A development practitioner working at the international, national or at the local level in environmental sectors.
  • A policy-maker or government official working on environmental policies and projects.

Completion Requirements

Each module includes a quiz to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. Learners who successfully pass each quiz with at least a 70% score will be able to download a certificate of participation from the course page. Learners can benefit of 3 attempts for each quiz.

Partners

This self-paced free course has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

 

 

What would be key elements to consider in the management of international waters? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant? Check out a new free e-learning module on gender and international waters to understand why it is important to engage both women and men to foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

International waters are crucial for human well-being, providing a multiplicity of essential ecosystem services and supporting a wide range of economic activities all over the world. Ensuring the sustainable management of such resources is therefore of paramount importance. In this context, what would be key elements to consider? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant?

A new free e-learning module on gender and international waters discusses the importance of taking gender considerations into account and of engaging both women and men in improved governance systems that will foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

Cover of the Module on Gender and International Waters

This engaging learning resource, open to environmental specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on gender and international waters, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender & International Waters
2.    Dimensions of International Waters and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender and International Waters: A Framework for Action

After completing this module, you will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender and international waters.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and international water resources.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to the sustainable management of international waters.
•    Provide examples of gender responsive initiatives related to international waters.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

Interactive features of the module

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course includes 6 modules on 1) gender and environment, 2) gender and biodiversity, 3) gender and climate change, 4) gender and land degradation, 5) gender and international waters, and 6) gender, chemicals and waste. A certificate of completion is made available to participants successfully completing the full course.

This e-learning product has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

Partner Logos

New free e-course on Gender, Chemicals and Waste available! Register at: www.unccelearn.org

Chemicals can be beneficial in many ways, supporting, for instance, agriculture and water purification. However, if they are not managed properly, they can be very harmful and have negative effects on both human health and the environment – affecting particularly the most vulnerable populations. In this context, are women and men exposed to the same risks? How is gender relevant when dealing with chemicals? If you want to learn more, register to the new free Online Module on Gender, Chemicals, and Waste!

The module has been launched at the side event “Integrating Gender into Sound Management of Chemicals and Waste”, held on 9 May 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, during the 2019 meetings of the Conferences of the Parties (COPs) to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) Conventions.

This engaging learning resource, open to specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on chemicals and waste management, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender and Chemicals
2.    Dimensions of Chemicals and Waste Management and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender, Chemicals and Waste: A Framework for Action.

After completing the module, participants will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender, chemicals and waste.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Provide examples of gender-responsive initiatives on chemicals and waste safety.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources, with the aim of providing a “one-stop-shop” of key information on this nexus. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN C:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the new online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. The course is launched today at the at the sixth GEF Assembly taking place in Danang, Viet Nam.

Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the new online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. The course is launched today at the at the sixth GEF Assembly taking place in Danang, Viet Nam.

This self-paced free course has been developed by UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

“The Gender and Environment e-course is the first of its kind and it will be a valuable resource for the environmental community in its efforts to be more gender responsive. This course will also help raise awareness and build capacity to implement GEF’s new policy on Gender Equality” said Francoise Clottes, GEF Director of Strategy and Operations.

“UNDP recognizes the transformative potential of gender equality to advance environmental sustainability. The course is an exciting opportunity to broaden understanding of the important links between gender and environment and offers practical tools, evidence and examples to mainstream gender in key environmental sectors.” said Adriana Dinu, Executive Coordinator, UNDP Global Environmental Finance.

“GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) is delighted to have led and facilitated the development of this useful course with all the partners. We are also excited to feature concrete SGP project examples where local communities have implemented innovative gender responsive projects and produced multiple benefits on both environment and livelihoods.” stated Yoko Watanabe, Global Manager, GEF Small Grants Programme.

The course allows learners to get a better understanding of the linkages between gender equality, women’s empowerment and environmental sustainability. It highlights how gender-responsive policies and projects support environmental outcomes.

This new e-learning resource is comprised of the following 6 modules:

  1. Gender & Environment (introductory module)
  2. Gender & Biodiversity
  3. Gender & Climate Change
  4. Gender & Land Degradation
  5. Gender & International Waters
  6. Gender & Chemicals and Waste

Each module takes around 1-1.5 hours to complete and includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises/reflection points, key messages and references to additional resources. A quiz at the end of each module allows participants to measure the achievement of the learning objectives.

The course can be accessed here.