Clarance K.Gbarlo is a man with many talents. He’s worked as a teacher at a refugee school, as a communications officer, and most recently, as a public relations officer for the Christian Network Missionary organization.

Clarance (left) is teaching climate change effects at the school. / ©: Clarance K.Gbarlo

He strongly believes that climate change is a big environmental and economic challenge for developing countries, therefore it’s important to teach people about climate change – not only by raising awareness, which is crucial, but also by giving communities the opportunity to capacity building in this field.

Clarance is also a learner at heart. He took his first UN CC:e-Learn course in 2017. He signed up to take the Human health and Climate Change course as part of his personal development ambitions. He later took the Cities and Climate Change course to acquire more knowledge on the environment and climate. He eventually landed a job at the Christian Network Missionary organization, who was impressed by his motivation to teach others about the effects that climate change has on people, plants and animals.

West Point is a township (the administrative equivalent of a city ward) of the Liberian capital city of Monrovia. Home to approximately 75,000 people, West Point is one of Monrovia’s most densely populated slums. UN Photo/ ©Albert González Farran

The organization went as far as taking the initiative to advertise the course among the communities in rural Liberia. This only strengthened his desire to continue learning through the courses offered by UNITAR and UN CC:Learn.

“I enrolled in additional courses, namely the Children and Climate Change course and the REDD+ e-Academy. I also took part in the Massive Open Online Course on National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture (NAP-Ag MOOC) and obtained the certificate,” he says.

“These courses enabled me as a professional to develop more good projects that will contribute more effectively to mitigating climate change. Knowing that my work will have a tangible impact on the environment encourages me to further engage in promoting renewable energies,” he adds.

Women dance during the celebration of International Women’s Day at the Samuel Kanyon Doe Sports Complex in Monrovia, Liberia. UN Photo/©Albert González Farran

A big reason why he is teaching climate change is that he believes the knowledge he gained from the courses is too important to not share.

I want to help communities in rural areas to identify, develop and implement initiatives, such as setting up better quality systems on national adaptation planning.

He believes that implementing such initiatives will allow communities to develop better food supply systems.

“Having solid knowledge on climate change issues is crucial for effectively promoting the importance of agriculture and food production.”

“When people have in-depth insights into the climate change phenomenon, those working on the ground are more prepared to develop agriculture projects that are viable, consistent and meet the needs of those most in need.”

“The UN CC:e-Learn platform courses are perfectly suited for this purpose,” he concludes.

Climate change is causing both scarcity and abundance of water. This has serious impacts on health, agriculture, energy and infrastructure. This course looks at integrated approaches to water management, and how these can help adaptation efforts.

Enroll
  • Health
  • Climate Change
  • Energy

Tutorial

0.45 hours

Welcome!

This tutorial introduces the concept of mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.

Who should take this course:

  • The engaged public and practitioners with an interest in better understanding the cross-sectoral linkages between water resources and climate change.
  • Policy-makers wanting to increase their understanding on how an integrated approach to water management can help adaptation across sectors and how it can be an entry-point for their National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). 
  • Policy-makers and experts attending the NAP-GSP face-to-face regional training on Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.  

Completion requirements

This course does not have a learning assessment therefore, a certificate will not be issued.

 

Partners

This tutorial is a learning initiative of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) as part of the National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP).  It is part of the support to the NAP Toolkit to the face-to-face training package.  The NAP-GSP is a joint programme, implemented by UNDP and UN Environment, in collaboration with other UN Agencies to assist countries with their NAP processes.  The programme is funded through the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) and Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF).

 

What would be key elements to consider in the management of international waters? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant? Check out a new free e-learning module on gender and international waters to understand why it is important to engage both women and men to foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

International waters are crucial for human well-being, providing a multiplicity of essential ecosystem services and supporting a wide range of economic activities all over the world. Ensuring the sustainable management of such resources is therefore of paramount importance. In this context, what would be key elements to consider? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant?

A new free e-learning module on gender and international waters discusses the importance of taking gender considerations into account and of engaging both women and men in improved governance systems that will foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

Cover of the Module on Gender and International Waters

This engaging learning resource, open to environmental specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on gender and international waters, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender & International Waters
2.    Dimensions of International Waters and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender and International Waters: A Framework for Action

After completing this module, you will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender and international waters.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and international water resources.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to the sustainable management of international waters.
•    Provide examples of gender responsive initiatives related to international waters.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

Interactive features of the module

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course includes 6 modules on 1) gender and environment, 2) gender and biodiversity, 3) gender and climate change, 4) gender and land degradation, 5) gender and international waters, and 6) gender, chemicals and waste. A certificate of completion is made available to participants successfully completing the full course.

This e-learning product has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

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New free e-course on Gender, Chemicals and Waste available! Register at: www.unccelearn.org

Chemicals can be beneficial in many ways, supporting, for instance, agriculture and water purification. However, if they are not managed properly, they can be very harmful and have negative effects on both human health and the environment – affecting particularly the most vulnerable populations. In this context, are women and men exposed to the same risks? How is gender relevant when dealing with chemicals? If you want to learn more, register to the new free Online Module on Gender, Chemicals, and Waste!

The module has been launched at the side event “Integrating Gender into Sound Management of Chemicals and Waste”, held on 9 May 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, during the 2019 meetings of the Conferences of the Parties (COPs) to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) Conventions.

This engaging learning resource, open to specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on chemicals and waste management, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender and Chemicals
2.    Dimensions of Chemicals and Waste Management and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender, Chemicals and Waste: A Framework for Action.

After completing the module, participants will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender, chemicals and waste.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Provide examples of gender-responsive initiatives on chemicals and waste safety.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources, with the aim of providing a “one-stop-shop” of key information on this nexus. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN C:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

Dans le but d’adopter une approche plus stratégique de l’apprentissage sur le changement climatique, le gouvernement du Kenya a officiellement rejoint le partenariat UN CC:Learn et lancé son projet national UN CC:Learn.

Le Kenya est un pays qui joue un rôle de premier plan dans la lutte contre le changement climatique, avec plusieurs politiques nationales déjà en place, et qui participe activement à de multiples initiatives internationales. Dans le but de renforcer les processus existants en adoptant une approche plus stratégique de l’apprentissage sur le changement climatique, le gouvernement du Kenya a officiellement rejoint le partenariat CC:Learn des Nations Unies en 2018. Le projet UN CC:Learn Project to Strengthen Human Resources and Skills to Advance the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) et le National Adaptation Plan (NAP) du Kenya seront mis en œuvre selon une approche multipartite et intersectorielle sous la direction de la Direction du changement climatique du Ministère de l’environnement et des forêts, en collaboration avec l’Organisation des Nations Unies pour l’alimentation et l’agriculture (FAO) et l’équipe de pays des Nations Unies.

Pour maximiser les synergies et les impacts, le projet CC:Learn des Nations Unies sera étroitement aligné sur un nouveau programme du Fonds vert pour le climat (GCF) et du plan d’adaptation national (PAN), soutenu par la FAO, et intitulé “Renforcement des capacités de planification et de la mise en œuvre efficace de l’adaptation au changement climatique au Kenya”. Ce programme triennal vise à renforcer les capacités techniques et institutionnelles de la planification de l’adaptation dans les principaux ministères, départements et organismes, et à consolider la base des connaissances existantes sur la planification nationale de l’adaptation, en fournissant des résultats fondés sur des faits pour les PANs et à collaborer avec le secteur privé pour soutenir les efforts d’adaptation.

L’événement de lancement des projets GCF NAP Readiness et UN CC:Learn, donnant officiellement le coup d’envoi des deux initiatives, a eu lieu le 29 avril 2019, à Nairobi, Kenya. L’événement a réuni plusieurs représentants gouvernementaux et non gouvernementaux pour discuter des deux projets et de leurs liens, ainsi que de la planification de leur mise en œuvre.

With the aim of taking a more strategic approach to climate change learning, the Government of Kenya officially joined the UN CC:Learn partnership and launched its national UN CC:Learn project.

Kenya is a leading country in taking action on climate change, having several dedicated national policies and being actively engaged in multiple international initiatives. With the aim of strengthening existing processes by taking a more strategic approach to climate change learning, the Government of Kenya officially joined the UN CC:Learn Partnership in 2018. The UN CC:Learn Project to Strengthen Human Resources and Skills to Advance the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and the National Adaptation Plan (NAP) of Kenya will be implemented through a multi-stakeholder and cross-sectoral approach under the leadership of the Climate Change Directorate, Ministry of Environment and Forestry, in collaboration with the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) and the UN Country Team.

To maximize synergies and impacts, the UN CC:Learn project will closely align with new FAO-supported GCF NAP Readiness Programme “Enhancing Capacity for Planning and Effective Implementation of Climate Change Adaptation in Kenya”. This 3-year programme aims at enhancing technical and institutional capacities for adaptation planning in key Ministries, Department and Agencies, strengthening the existing knowledge base on national adaptation planning, providing evidence-based results for NAPs, and engaging with the private sector to support adaptation efforts.

The Launch Event of the GCF NAP Readiness and UN CC:Learn Projects, officially kick-starting both initiatives, took place on 29 April 2019, in Nairobi, Kenya. The event brought together several governmental and non-governmental representatives to discuss the two projects and their linkages, as well as plan for their implementation.

UN CC:Learn has offset its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions through the United Nations Carbon Offset Platform. Learn more about the projects supported by UN CC:Learn in Kenya and Brazil and how they are helping these countries to meet their goals of promoting sustainable development.

According to the UNFCCC Secretariat, ‘offsetting is a climate action that enables individuals and organizations to compensate for the emissions they cannot avoid, by supporting worthy projects that reduce emissions somewhere else’. To limit its environmental impact, UNITAR, which hosts the Secretariat of UN CC:Learn, has offset its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for the year 2017 through the United Nations Carbon Offset Platform.

This platform showcases a range of initiatives that reduce, avoid or remove GHG emissions from the atmosphere.  Currently, 16 projects in Latin America and the Caribbean, 1 project in Africa, 1 in Oceania and 27 in Asia are presented. All projects are executed at national or local levels in developing countries and help these countries to meet their goals of promoting sustainable development. Positive impacts can be achieved in the area of environmental protection, through better air and water quality and increased soil fertility, as well as social protection, for instance enhancing gender equality, health services, education, and job creation. The projects can also contribute to advancing local economic growth and promoting sustainable energy.

UN CC:Learn has selected the following two projects developed in Kenya and Brazil where the Secretariat is active through national and global activities:

Efficient Cook Stove Programme in Kenya 

The project will distribute energy efficient cooking stoves to domestic households in rural areas of Kenya. The use of efficient stoves aims to reduce carbon emissions by allowing families to cook the same amount of food using less non-renewable biomass. It will reduce fuel wood consumption and impact positively in several ways. First, it will reduce the use of non-renewable biomass from Kenyan forests and assist the maintenance of existing forest stock. Second, the amount of indoor air pollutants from the burning of biomass in the home will be reduced. Third, the costs incurred in the purchase of fuel will be reduced through increased thermal efficiency.

Santana I SHP CDM Project in Brazil 

The project reduces emissions through the development of electricity from a renewable source, the small hydropower plant on the Santana riverbank in the State of Mato Grosso. The project activities reduce emissions of greenhouse gases by avoiding thermoelectric plant operations that use fossil fuels as an energy source. This project has already impacted the region positively in several areas, for example, it has avoided soil erosion and improved the soil quality, protected depletable natural resources, created new job opportunities and improved local living conditions.

Offsetting GHG emissions play an important role in progressively replacing the use of polluting technologies and advancing environmentally sustainable solutions. Through the selected projects, the UN CC:Learn Secretariat contributes to the objectives of the Paris Agreement, which limits the rise of global temperature to less than 2 degrees Celsius.

For a third consecutive year, the Climate Classroom provided an opportunity to COP participants to get up to speed on key climate change topics through 45-minute learning sessions. The classes provide highlights in key climate change areas for busy delegates to be better prepared when joining discussions and events at COP24 of the UNFCCC.

For a third consecutive year, the Climate Classroom provided an opportunity to COP participants to get up to speed on key climate change topics through 45-minute learning sessions. The classes provide highlights in key climate change areas for busy delegates to be better prepared when joining discussions and events at COP24 of the UNFCCC, held in Katowice, Poland in December 2018, and beyond.

Mr. Filipe Domingos Freires Lúcio, Director of the Global Framework for Climate Services Office, WMO. Mr. Diarmid Campbell-Lendrum, Coordinator of the Climate Change and Health Programme, WHO and Mr. Tarek Ezzine, Liaison Officer for Public Health, IFMSA.

On this occasion, 10 sessions were delivered by expert trainers from multiple organizations committed to sustainable development on the following topics: Paris AgreementClimate FinanceHealth and Climate Change, Climate Services for Decision-Making, Climate Information for Renewable Energy Penetration, Decision-making for Water Resources Management, Innovation for Climate Change, Climate Services for NAPs, Agriculture and Food Security.

Prof. Alberto Troccoli, Managing Director of the World Energy & Meteorology Council. Mr. John H. Matthews, Lead and Co-founder of the Alliance for Global Water Adaptation (AGWA).

Over 180 people interested in learning more about climate change joined the initiative throughout the 2-weeks of COP. Decision-makers, government officials, practitioners, academics, and students from around the world were all part of the public. 

Mr. Anil Mishra, Programme Specialist, UNESCO’s International Hydrological Programme (IHP). Dr. Achala Abeysinghe, Principal Researcher at the Climate Change Group of the International Institute for Environment and Development.
At COP24, the Climate Classroom had its greatest reach so far and gathered a lot of positive feedback, comments, and requests for additional sessions. The pop-up setup and headsets used to discuss different climate change topics are still a learning experience that people find innovative and appealing.

Ms. Elena Zheglova, UNITAR. Mr. John Furlow, Deputy Director and Ms. Mélody Braun, Research Staff Associate, Financial Instruments Sector, The International Research Institute for Climate and Society, Columbia University
The Climate Classroom @ COP24 was graciously hosted in the WMO-IPCC Pavilion. The space was visible to a broad public, using a completely mobile “pop-up” set-up, including a flipchart, banners and the headsets that make the class possible in the noisy environment.

Mr. Angus Mackay, Director, Division for Planet, UNITAR. Mrs. Katiuscia Fara, Climate Services and Disaster Risk Reduction Advisor, WFP and Mr. Eddie Jjemba, Urban Resilience Advisor, Red Cross Red Crescent Climate Centre.
The Climate Classroom @ COP24 is an initiative of the Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC) and the One UN Climate Change Learning Partnership (UN CC:Learn), in collaboration with UN Partners. 

The UN CC:Learn introductory e-Course on Climate Change is now available in Portuguese! This version of the course was developed in collaboration with UNESCO Office in Brazil. The course was officially launched in São Paulo, Brazil.

Versao em português

The UN CC:Learn Introductory e-Course on Climate Change, which has gathered participants from all around the world, is now available in Portuguese! This version of the course was developed in collaboration with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) Office in Brazil. The course was officially launched in São Paulo, Brazil.

The course is free and self-paced, which allows participants to master the basics of climate change and to gain a certificate produced by UNITAR and other UN partners.

The e-course is structured in six modules:

  1. Climate Change Science
  2. International Legal and Policy Framework for Climate Change
  3. Climate Change Adaptation
  4. Climate Change Mitigation and Low Carbon Development
  5. Climate Change Finance
  6. Climate Change Governance and Planning

The e-course is available in 5 languages, in addition to Portuguese: English, French, Spanish, and Chinese Mandarin.

More details available in the Course Syllabus. To begin the course, please register at the UN CC:e-Learn platform.

About UNESCO Office in Brazil

UNESCO Office in Brazil, Brasilia, is a national office in the Latin America and the Caribbean Region. Its main objective is to support the creation and implementation of public policies that are in accordance with the strategies set by UNESCO Member States.