How effective can putting a price on carbon be in the fight against climate change? That’s what you will find out in our course on Carbon Taxation.

 

This 12-hour, self-paced course walks you through the ins and outs of carbon tax and explains the social, economic and environmental benefits that can come from it. Interested? Take the course today to start learning more about carbon taxes.

For centuries, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) have been driving anthropogenic climate change. If the world is to reign in the devastating effects of rising temperatures, countries need to step up their efforts to halt carbon emissions. But how can they do that? Putting a price on carbon may be an integral part of the answer. Several countries across the globe have implemented carbon taxes or intend to do so. Currently, there are 64 carbon pricing initiatives in place, covering 22.3% of global GHG emissions.

Mindful of the untapped opportunities that carbon pricing presents, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the World Bank have come together to develop a course which lays out the ins and outs of carbon taxes. The self-paced, free online course “Carbon Taxation” invites users to learn how carbon taxes work while examining the social, economic and environmental benefits that can stem from this policy tool. This course is divided into 5 modules and takes and estimated time of 12 hours to be completed.

The social cost of one ton of carbon emissions.

During the course, users will learn about different designs that can be used to price carbon. Moreover, they will see that carbon taxes can become an important revenue source, providing crucial funding for governments’ numerous development objectives. By implementing a carbon tax, governments ensure that “bads” such as emissions have an adequate price while protecting the “goods” within a society, such as a clean environment and employment.

After completing this course, users will be able to:

  • Describe how carbon taxes work in reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Outline key considerations that shape the decision to adopt carbon taxes
  • Summarize approaches for determining the carbon tax base and rate
  • Differentiate main undesirable effects and mitigation measures
  • List options for revenue use

Despite not requiring any prior knowledge of the subject, this course primarily targets people who want to build a solid understanding of carbon taxation. People who may benefit greatly from the content of this course are:

  • Stakeholders who wish to follow the global discourse on carbon taxation or who are involved in designing and implementing carbon taxes
  • Mid-level project developers and policy makers such as representatives from Ministries
  • Technical experts and practitioners engaged in country-level work within the PMR

The course was developed to keep you engaged at all times. Over the five modules, you will be presented with interactive activities, quizzes and media. While a modular learning sequence is proposed, users can select modules based on individual preferences. The modules are completed with the purpose of achieving module-specific learning objectives. For the most curious learners, publications and relevant databases will be provided along the way.

The course is available on UN CC:Learn e-Learning Platform and is currently available in English. Upon successful completion, users will get an official UN CC:Learn Certificate of Completion.

Trade can power a greener economic recovery from the pandemic. Global demand for environmental goods and services is set to rise, as countries roll out rescue packages with large provisions for climate-friendly solutions. This course introduces participants to key approaches to harness green trade opportunities.

Enroll
  • Green Economy
  • Finance
  • Cities
  • Energy

Self-paced course

2 hours

Welcome

World trade patterns show that while many developing countries are now playing an increasing role in trade, many other—and particularly least developed countries who account for less than 1% of all global trade—remain stranded on the margins. Still heavily reliant on natural resource-based products and raw materials for their exports, these countries are highly vulnerable to economic and environmental shocks.

The transition to an inclusive green economy represents many significant opportunities. By harnessing the increasing global demand for environmental goods and services, as well as consumer demand for more sustainable products, countries can diversify their economies, reduce their commodity dependence and boost their competitiveness. Thus, societies promote long-term, sustainable development while also strengthening their capacity to tackle the manifold environmental challenges lying ahead.

Trade can also power a green economic recovery from COVID-19. Global demand for environmental goods and services is expected to rise as countries roll out economic stimuli with larger earmarks for climate-friendly solutions. While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the various approaches that may be taken to harness green trade opportunities.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Outline the evolution of legal and governance frameworks underpinning the trade and green economy interface
  • Identify perceived challenges and potential opportunities related to trade in the transition to a green economy
  • Describe enabling policy conditions to foster green trade practices
  • Highlight sectoral case studies of green trade in action

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of the policy instruments and enabling conditions needed for countries to advance the green economy transition via green trade, and vice-versa. It contains four lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The trade and environment interface
  2. Perceived tensions and synergies between trade liberalization and the green economy
  3. Enabling conditions and policy design for green trade
  4. Seizing sectoral opportunities

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Green fiscal policies can help make public expenditures more efficient. This is key as the world strives to ‘build back better’ after the COVID-19 pandemic. This course introduces participants to the fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to transition to a green economy.

 

“I love the course. It touches the real-life activities” – Learner from Ecuador

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  • Green Economy
  • Cities
  • Finance
  • Energy

Self-paced course

2 hours

Welcome

The COVID-19 pandemic exposed many fragilities of our economies and deepened existing inequalities and imbalances. However, long before the pandemic hit nations across the world, many economies were marked by harmful and inefficient use of public and private resources, reinforcing environmental degradation, biodiversity loss, global warming and vulnerabilities linked to health and social exclusion. In the wake of the health and economic crisis, citizens are increasingly demanding a departure from business-as-usual approaches in favour of truly innovative and green policies. Similarly, many governments recognize that the transformative potential of this circumstance must not be wasted.

Greening recovery efforts can help nations build forward better after the pandemic to increase the well-being of people and resilience of countries to future crises. Green fiscal policies in particular can play a key role in countries’ recovery efforts by removing inefficiencies in public expenditures and raising additional fiscal revenues which can be directed towards immediate COVID-19 relief measures while supporting longer-term investments.  While this course was developed prior to the outbreak of COVID-19, its contents therefore remain relevant to current policy discussions.

One practical challenge lies in ensuring that countries are both aware of these opportunities and that they possess the knowledge and skills to take advantage of them. To address this challenge, the course sets out to provide interested participants from government, business, and civil society with an introduction to the green fiscal policy tools and approaches to foster a more sustainable future

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What will you learn?

Participants completing the course will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for greater use of green fiscal policy
  • List different fiscal instruments to promote desirable economic, social and environmental outcomes
  • Describe the key stages of the policy cycle
  • Highlight the main opportunities and challenges presented by the energy, transport and waste management sectors
  • Outline how international collaboration enhances fiscal policy action taken at the national level

Course structure at a glance

The course aims to provide participants with a solid understanding of fiscal policy instruments and reform strategies available to policymakers to advance the green economy transition. It contains five lessons, each taking approximately 20 minutes to complete:

  1. The need for green fiscal policy
  2. Fiscal instruments for greening the economy
  3. Effective strategies for fiscal reform
  4. Applying green fiscal policy in key sectors
  5. Collaborating for impact

Get a certificate!

A final quiz composed of ten multiple choice questions serves to assess learners’ achievement of the course’s learning objectives. The quiz can be taken at any time and attempted up to three times. Learners need to pass the quiz with a score of at least 70%. Once the quiz is successfully passed, a Certificate of Completion will be available for download on the course’s Certification page.

Partners

This course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN EnvironmentInternational Labour OrganizationUN Development ProgrammeUN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertises and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on inclusive green economy.

Mr. Clarance K.Gbarlo believes that the knowledge he gained from the UN CC:Learn courses is too important to not share. In this spirit, he has been teaching climate change in rural communities in Liberia. For him, those working on the ground are more prepared to develop agriculture projects that are viable, consistent and meet the needs of those most in need.

Clarance K.Gbarlo is a man with many talents. He’s worked as a teacher at a refugee school, as a communications officer, and most recently, as a public relations officer for the Christian Network Missionary organization.

Clarance (left) is teaching climate change effects at the school. / ©: Clarance K.Gbarlo

He strongly believes that climate change is a big environmental and economic challenge for developing countries, therefore it’s important to teach people about climate change – not only by raising awareness, which is crucial, but also by giving communities the opportunity to capacity building in this field.

Clarance is also a learner at heart. He took his first UN CC:e-Learn course in 2017. He signed up to take the Human health and Climate Change course as part of his personal development ambitions. He later took the Cities and Climate Change course to acquire more knowledge on the environment and climate. He eventually landed a job at the Christian Network Missionary organization, who was impressed by his motivation to teach others about the effects that climate change has on people, plants and animals.

West Point is a township (the administrative equivalent of a city ward) of the Liberian capital city of Monrovia. Home to approximately 75,000 people, West Point is one of Monrovia’s most densely populated slums. UN Photo/ ©Albert González Farran

The organization went as far as taking the initiative to advertise the course among the communities in rural Liberia. This only strengthened his desire to continue learning through the courses offered by UNITAR and UN CC:Learn.

I enrolled in additional courses, namely the Children and Climate Change course and the REDD+ e-Academy. I also took part in the Massive Open Online Course on National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture (NAP-Ag MOOC) and obtained the certificate,” he says.

 

These courses enabled me as a professional to develop more good projects that will contribute more effectively to mitigating climate change. Knowing that my work will have a tangible impact on the environment encourages me to further engage in promoting renewable energies,” he adds.

Women dance during the celebration of International Women’s Day at the Samuel Kanyon Doe Sports Complex in Monrovia, Liberia. UN Photo/©Albert González Farran

A big reason why he is teaching climate change is that he believes the knowledge he gained from the courses is too important to not share.

I want to help communities in rural areas to identify, develop and implement initiatives, such as setting up better quality systems on national adaptation planning.”

He believes that implementing such initiatives will allow communities to develop better food supply systems.

Having solid knowledge on climate change issues is crucial for effectively promoting the importance of agriculture and food production.

When people have in-depth insights into the climate change phenomenon, those working on the ground are more prepared to develop agriculture projects that are viable, consistent and meet the needs of those most in need.

 

The UN CC:e-Learn platform courses are perfectly suited for this purpose,” he concludes.

Climate change is causing both scarcity and abundance of water. This has serious impacts on health, agriculture, energy and infrastructure. This course looks at integrated approaches to water management, and how these can help adaptation efforts.

Enroll
  • Health
  • Climate Change
  • Energy
  • Adaptation

Tutorial

0.45 hours

Welcome

This tutorial introduces the concept of mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.

Who should take this course

  • The engaged public and practitioners with an interest in better understanding the cross-sectoral linkages between water resources and climate change.
  • Policy-makers wanting to increase their understanding on how an integrated approach to water management can help adaptation across sectors and how it can be an entry-point for their National Adaptation Plans (NAPs). 
  • Policy-makers and experts attending the NAP-GSP face-to-face regional training on Mainstreaming climate change adaptation into water resources.  

Completion requirements

This course does not have a learning assessment therefore, a certificate will not be issued.

Partners

This tutorial is a learning initiative of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) as part of the National Adaptation Plan Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP).  It is part of the support to the NAP Toolkit to the face-to-face training package.  The NAP-GSP is a joint programme, implemented by UNDP and UN Environment, in collaboration with other UN Agencies to assist countries with their NAP processes.  The programme is funded through the Global Environment Facility (GEF) Least Developed Countries Fund (LDCF) and Special Climate Change Fund (SCCF).

 

Basic knowledge about climate change is needed more than ever. For example, what temperature change is projected for this century? How do international negotiations work? What adaptation and mitigation options exist? This course provides answers to these and other introductory questions about climate change.

 

“From basic to advanced modules, this course is very comprehensive and brilliant.” – Learner from Spain

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  • Climate Change
  • Science
  • Cities
  • Education
  • Youth
  • Finance
  • Adaptation
  • Energy

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

This e-course provides “everything you need to know” about the basics of climate change. It is divided into six modules, each taking an average of 2 hours to complete. Each has 4 to 5 learning objectives. A short quiz at the end of each module allows you to verify if you have achieved these learning objectives. You have three attempts to try each quiz.

What you will learn

After completing the course, you will be able to:

  • Explain the fundamentals of climate change science.
  • Present the international climate change legal and policy framework and explain key issues under negotiation.
  • Describe the expected consequences of climate change and the role of adaptation.
  • Provide a rationale for climate change mitigation and propose actions in key sectors.
  • Identify the main streams of climate change finance.
  • Outline basic elements of planning processes to deliver climate change action.
  • Analyze principal challenges and opportunities for climate change action.

The course at a glance

The course is structured around six basic modules:

  1. Climate Change Science
  2. International Legal and Policy Framework for Climate Change
  3. Climate Change Adaptation
  4. Climate Change Mitigation
  5. Climate Change Finance
  6. Planning for Climate Change

Completion requirements

Once all 6 modules are completed with above 70% of passing scores individually, you will receive a certificate of completion. Your certificate will be automatically available on the ‘achievement’ section under the course page. You can decide to take all modules or choose to select those that most interest you.

 

There is agreement that the world needs to shift to a greener economy. But there is little understanding of what a green economy is and how to advance it. In this course, participants will be introduced to key concepts, policy instruments and international frameworks for inclusive green economies.

 

“It is a great course and I strongly recommend it to all who are passionate about the green economy!” – Learner from Nigeria

Enroll
  • Green Economy
  • Youth
  • Finance
  • Energy
  • Science

Self-paced course

10 hours

Welcome

In this course, we will go on a journey that introduces us to the basic concepts, policy instruments and international frameworks of inclusive green economies. Our path consists of five modules which are divided into smaller sections. You can start with any module depending on your preference.

If you encounter any difficulty or if you have any questions, please consult our help page.

What You Will Learn

After completing the course, learners will be able to:

  • Describe the rationale and core concepts for realizing an inclusive green economy against
    business-as-usual practices
  • Identify enabling conditions for greening national economies
  • Outline principal opportunities and challenges in key sectors
  • Provide examples of national strategies and planning to advance an inclusive green economy
  • Distinguish international frameworks and initiatives in support of an inclusive green economy

Course at a glance

The course is structured into five modules:

  1. Understanding where we are: The rationale for advancing an inclusive green economy
  2. Focusing on the instruments:  Enabling conditions for structural change
  3. Sighting the destination: Key sectors with high greening potential
  4. Devising a pathway: Strategies and planning for reaching policy objectives
  5. A helping environment: International frameworks and initiatives to support an inclusive green economy

Completion requirements

Each of the five modules features a quiz. A quiz is passed with a score of 70% or above. You have three
attempts for each quiz.
Once you successfully passed all quizzes, you will receive a certificate of completion.
Your certificate will be automatically available to download in the “Achievements” section under the course page.

Partners

This e-course has been developed under the umbrella of the Partnership for Action on Green Economy (PAGE). PAGE brings together five UN agencies – UN Environment, International Labour Organization, UN Development Programme, UN Industrial Development Organization, and UN Institute for Training and Research – whose mandates, expertise and networks combined can offer integrated and holistic support to countries on the inclusive green economy.

 

Citizens in every country need to understand climate change, and what it means for them and for the world. The course provides an introduction to key climate actions, such as adaptation, low carbon development, climate finance, and climate negotiations. Participants will also formulate a pledge, project or policy.

 

“I loved this course – it helped me understand the way our climate is changing, and what is needed in order to stop climate change. It has motivated me to keep learning, get involved, and take action.” – Learner from India

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Youth
  • Adaptation
  • Finance
  • Science
  • Education
  • Cities
  • Energy

Self-paced course

8 hours

Think, Learn, Act Climate!

The course helps you understand what climate change is, how it affects you and others, and what can be done to address it. After completing the course, participants will be able to answer the following:

  • What is climate change?
  • How do we adapt to the negative impacts of climate change?
  • What opportunities exist for a low carbon future?
  • How do we plan and finance climate actions?
  • How do climate negotiations work?

Participants will also develop a concrete action plan or project to tackle climate change!

The Course at a Glance

Module 1: What is climate change and how does it affect us?
Module 2: How to adapt to climate change?
Module 3: How to mitigate climate change?
Module 4: How to plan and finance action on climate change?
Module 5: How do climate change negotiations work?
Module 6: How to tackle climate change in practice?

Each module takes two hours to complete and features videos, lessons, and exercises that give you an overview of a different aspect of climate change!

Your Instructors

Maxx Diley, Director, Climate Prediction and Adaptation, World Meteorological Organization (WMO)
.Prior to joining WMO, Maxx worked at United Nations Development Programme, International Research Institute for Climate and Society (IRI) at Columbia University, World Bank, the U.S. Agency for International Development's Office of U.S. Foreign Disaster Assistance. He has designed, managed and contributed to disaster and risk management programmes in Africa, Latin America and Asia, and has written numerous papers on disaster reduction and climate-related topics.

Motsomi Maletjane, Team Leader, LDC Unit, National Adaptation Plans and Policy, Adaptation Programme, UNFCCC Secretariat. He works on matters relating to LDCs under the Convention and supports the work of the Least Developed Countries Expert Group on the national adaptation programmes of action (NAPAs), the national adaptation plans (NAPs) and the LDC work programme. Prior to joining the Secretariat, Motsomi worked for the Government of Lesotho, supporting various areas of climate-related work.

Miguel Naranjo,Programme Officer, Global Climate Action, UNFCCC Secretariat. He worked as a process engineer and an environmental supervisor for a transnational corporation and later joined the climate change team of UN Environment in the regional office for Latin America and the Caribbean. He joined the UN Climate Change Secretariat in 2011, where he has focused on capacity building for mitigation and carbon market mechanisms, and promoting climate action among the private sector and other stakeholders to meet the goals of the Paris Agreements and the Sustainable Development Goals.

Steven Stone, Chief of Resources and Markets Branch, UN Environment

. Steven holds a PhD in Resource Economics from Cornell University and has more than 20 years of professional experience in environmental and natural resource management. As Chief of Branch, Steven directs a team dedicated to furthering the knowledge base, outreach and support to countries on environmental and resource economics as key components of economic, trade and investment policy.

Dr. Martin Frick, Senior Director, Policy and Programme Coordination, UNFCCC Secretariat

. As Senior Director, Martin Frick oversees UNFCCC’s work supporting the implementation of the Paris Agreement and climate action.  He previously served as Director for Climate Change at UNFAO. He was the German representative for human rights and humanitarian affairs at the UN General Assembly and served as the European Union’s lead negotiator in the establishment of the UN Human Rights Council.

Niclas Svenningsen, Manager, Global Climate Action, UNFCCC Secretariat

. He is responsible for developing and strengthening approaches and strategies for catalyzing climate action under, and in addition to, activities mandated by UNFCCC. He previously worked with the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) where he was in charge of the climate-neutral strategy of the UN system, as well as for the implementation of UNEP’s programmes for sustainable buildings, urban development, and sustainable procurement.

Three Levels of Climate Fitness

You can learn according to your own needs, interests and time availability. But remember! – the time and efforts you put in the course will correspond to your climate abilities!

Three levels of climate learning and corresponding CLIMATE FITNESS can be obtained via the course:

Level 1: You know climate – Watch all the video and complete all quizzes.

Level 2: You can teach climate – Watch all the videos and complete the lessons and quizzes.

Level 3: You can act climate – Watch all the videos and complete the lessons, activities and quizzes.

Get your Certificate

Once you have taken obtained a passing grade of 70% or more to all quizzes you qualify for a certificate of completion from the course. Be aware that you only have up to 5 attempts per quiz.

Your Certificate will become automatically available to download under the tap “Certification” on the main course page.

Partners

Special thanks to all UN CC:Learn Partners for the development of this course!

What would be key elements to consider in the management of international waters? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant? Check out a new free e-learning module on gender and international waters to understand why it is important to engage both women and men to foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

International waters are crucial for human well-being, providing a multiplicity of essential ecosystem services and supporting a wide range of economic activities all over the world. Ensuring the sustainable management of such resources is therefore of paramount importance. In this context, what would be key elements to consider? Is the way in which women and men interact with water resources relevant?

A new free e-learning module on gender and international waters discusses the importance of taking gender considerations into account and of engaging both women and men in improved governance systems that will foster a more equitable and sustainable water resource use for everybody.

Cover of the Module on Gender and International Waters

This engaging learning resource, open to environmental specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on gender and international waters, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender & International Waters
2.    Dimensions of International Waters and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender and International Waters: A Framework for Action

After completing this module, you will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender and international waters.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and international water resources.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to the sustainable management of international waters.
•    Provide examples of gender responsive initiatives related to international waters.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

Interactive features of the module

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course includes 6 modules on 1) gender and environment, 2) gender and biodiversity, 3) gender and climate change, 4) gender and land degradation, 5) gender and international waters, and 6) gender, chemicals and waste. A certificate of completion is made available to participants successfully completing the full course.

This e-learning product has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

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New free e-course on Gender, Chemicals and Waste available! Register at: www.unccelearn.org

Chemicals can be beneficial in many ways, supporting, for instance, agriculture and water purification. However, if they are not managed properly, they can be very harmful and have negative effects on both human health and the environment – affecting particularly the most vulnerable populations. In this context, are women and men exposed to the same risks? How is gender relevant when dealing with chemicals? If you want to learn more, register to the new free Online Module on Gender, Chemicals, and Waste!

The module has been launched at the side event “Integrating Gender into Sound Management of Chemicals and Waste”, held on 9 May 2019, in Geneva, Switzerland, during the 2019 meetings of the Conferences of the Parties (COPs) to the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm (BRS) Conventions.

This engaging learning resource, open to specialists, development practitioners and policy-makers working on chemicals and waste management, as well as anyone interested, is self-paced and takes around 1 hour to complete. It is divided into three sections:

1.    Gender and Chemicals
2.    Dimensions of Chemicals and Waste Management and the Gender Gap
3.    Gender, Chemicals and Waste: A Framework for Action.

After completing the module, participants will be able to:

•    Describe the relationship between gender, chemicals and waste.
•    Identify key international commitments on gender equality and sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Explain how gender equality contributes to sound management of chemicals and waste.
•    Provide examples of gender-responsive initiatives on chemicals and waste safety.

The module includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises, key messages and references to additional resources, with the aim of providing a “one-stop-shop” of key information on this nexus. An offline version is also available for self-study or training purposes.

At the end, a quiz allows users to measure the achievement of the learning objectives and, if successful, receive a certificate of participation.

While self-standing, the module is part of the free e-learning course on the gender and environment that can be accessed on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. This course has been developed by the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), UNITAR/UN C:Learn, with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.