Doddy S. Sukadri, a UN CC: Learn Ambassador and Executive Director of the Green Partner Foundation, analyses what actions Indonesia can take to comply with the Breakthrough Agenda resulting from COP26.

COP-26 reaffirmed the need to keep the earth’s temperature increase not exceeding 1.50 Celsius compared to the average earth temperature before the 18th-century industrial revolution. According to the official report of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), sooner or later more severe climate disasters will occur in various parts of the world if we cannot stop the increase in the earth’s temperature above 1.50 C. To keep the 1.5°C targets, half of the global emissions must be cut to achieve net-zero emissions by the middle of this century (2050). The key to achieving this target is the Breakthrough Agenda, initiated by the UK and shared by 42 world leaders, which collectively represent 70% of global GDP.

The Breakthrough Agenda called The Glasgow Breakthrough is an unprecedented global clean technology plan to help keep 1.5°C within reach of all parties. The main key is the successful implementation of technology transfer from developed countries to developing countries.

Technology Transfer

The development of technology transfer to support national action on climate change has been an important element since the beginning of the process of establishing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. The 26-article of the Convention deserves to be viewed as ‘law’, which must be followed and become a stepping stone in any global climate change negotiations.

Articles 4 paragraphs 1 and 5 of the UNFCCC state that all Parties must introduce and promote and cooperate in the development and transfer of GHG emission reduction technologies. It further states that the Convention urges developed countries to take all practical steps to promote, facilitate and finance the transfer of, or access to, climate technology to other Parties, in particular to developing countries. Furthermore, the Convention states that the effectiveness of technology transfer will depend largely on the commitment of developed countries in terms of funding for technology transfer.

The Glasgow Breakthrough

COP-26 has resulted in the so-called “Glasgow Breakthroughs”, which are a series of agreements between developed and developing countries to rapidly scale up clean technologies in five sectors that collectively account for more than 50% of global emissions:

  • The first is called “Power”. What is meant here are alternative energy resources that are clean and become the most affordable option and become the mainstay for all countries to meet the world’s energy needs efficiently by 2030;
  • The second is “Land Transportation”. Zero-emission vehicles are a thing that will become a necessity in the future. Such vehicles must be accessible, affordable, and sustainable in all countries by 2030;
  • The third is “Steel”. The zero-emissions or near-zero-emissions steel industry is a more desirable option in the global market through the use of more efficient steel products in every country by 2030;
  • The fourth is “Hydrogen”. Hydrogen gas is meant to be renewable, affordable, and low carbon. It is hoped that this kind of hydrogen gas will be available globally by 2030;
  • The fifth is “Agriculture”. Smart, climate-resilient and sustainable agricultural practices are the most attractive option and are widely adopted by farmers everywhere by 2030.

However, the Glasgow Breakthrough requires investment in technology and innovation. The Parties expect to establish stronger cooperation between the government and business players through various national and international initiatives to spur the process of technology transfer and innovation as well as improve the green industry. This includes, for example, stimulating green investment through policy incentives and strong signals to industry about the future economy, aligning policies and standards, enhancing R&D efforts, coordinating public investment, and mobilizing non-state budget finance, particularly in developing countries.

What we can do?

From a climate change point of view, Indonesia, with its vast area and strategic location, is considered very important in efforts to mitigate and adapt to global climate change. With a wealth of natural resources in the form of forests, energy and minerals, sea, peat, and mangroves, Indonesia’s potential for carbon sequestration and storage is extraordinary. Indonesia’s contribution is highly expected to participate in solving global climate change solutions, especially in pursuing the Paris Agreement targets. However, this hope will only be realized with a strong commitment, funding support, and adequate human resources. The role of developed countries to implement efficient, cheap, and sustainable technology transfer as framed in Article 4 of the UNFCCC is very necessary to implement this Breakthrough Agenda.

The year 2030 is just in the corner, and the homework from Glasgow needs to be done quickly. The Indonesia National Determined Contribution (NDC) needs to be reviewed, not only to increase the ambition of greenhouse gas emission reduction but also to synchronize it with Glasgow’s five breakthrough agendas. Simultaneously, the agenda needs to be integrated and synchronized with development plans that are already on the table/in progress at the national, provincial, and district/city levels.

Because this Glasgow breakthrough emphasizes technological collaboration between the government and business people, a strategic road map is needed until 2030 and beyond. At least a high level of commitment is required in the short, medium, and long-term national development plans by taking into account social, political, and economic aspects. Infrastructure support, human and financial resources are definitely needed, but again two important things are required as preconditions to realize this hope, namely leadership, and good governance. 

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This article reflects the personal view of Mr Doddy Sukadri, UN CC:Learn Ambassador and Executive Director of Yayasan Mitra Hijau (Green Partner Foundation).

How are gender equality and human rights interlinked with climate change and renewable energy?

 

The new “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-course aims to answer this question while unpacking these critical issues in a 6-hour learning experience.

 

Read on to find out more about it.

 

Climate change effects are far-reaching and concern every aspect of society, from economic development to the realization of human rights. By multiplying existing threats, climate change disproportionally affects vulnerable groups – such as women, youth, the elderly, and persons with disabilities, reduce their ability to adapt and respond to its challenges, and enhances inequalities. 

In this context, UN CC:Learn has partnered up with EmPower, an initiative led by UN Environment and UN Women with support from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), to develop the “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-course. This new free, self-paced e-course aims to equip decision-makers with the tools and knowledge to integrate gender and human rights into climate policies and commitments while explaining how to develop inclusive climate mitigation and adaptation actions, with a particular focus on the renewable energy sector.

At the end of the course, participants will be able to: 

  • Describe the nexus between gender equality, human rights, renewable energy, and climate change
  • Explain how a gender-responsive and human rights-based approach in climate action leads to economic, social, and environmental benefits
  • Recognize international and sectoral commitments on gender equality, human rights, and climate change and their relationship with national priorities and policies
  • Identify entry points for gender and human rights in renewable energy and climate policy and action
  • Select and apply tools and approaches for the promotion of human rights-based and gender-responsive climate action
  • Discuss targeted opportunities for women in climate change and renewable energy, with a particular focus on multi-stakeholder collaboration, renewable energy entrepreneurship, and access to finance.

The course consists of an introductory module and two specialized ones. The former introduces the interconnections between gender equality and human rights in climate action and renewable energy. Module 2 focuses on how to develop and implement gender-responsive renewable energy policies and programmes, with the goal of creating more opportunities for women to access and benefits from renewable energy. It pays particular attention to the promotion on women’s renewable energy entrepreneurship. Module 3 delves into how to develop and implement gender-responsive and human rights-inclusive climate change policies and frameworks at national level, including in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs).

Learners are invited to complete the first introductory module and then choose one of the two specialized modules according to the selected pathway. Pathway 1 is particularly intended for renewable energy experts and professionals of financial institutions. Pathway 2 is designed specifically for climate change and green economy policymakers. Participants can also opt to take all three modules. 

Each module has four lessons, a final quiz and takes an estimated 2 hours to be completed. To succeed, participants must score 70% or higher within three attempts for each final quiz. Upon successful completion of each, participants will receive a badge. After completing the quizzes for the chosen pathway, participants will be able to download their certificate from the “Certification” section of the course’s webpage.

Take the course here.

Disclaimer

Cover picture credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Panos Pictures

UN CC:Learn’s participation at COP26 highlighted the importance of education and learning in scaling up climate action.

 

As in previous editions, the programme held a series of activities, notably the Climate Classroom, and collaborated with a wide range of partners.

 

Read on to find out more!

During the 26th Conferences of the Parties (COP26) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), held in Glasgow, Scotland from 31 October to 12 November 2021, UN CC:Learn supported two One UN side events and held the eighth edition of its Climate Classroom, the series of 45-minute lessons which have become the programme’s flagship initiative at COP.

UN CC:Learn’s participation at COP26 started out with a class on “Enhancing and Tracking the Arc of Ambition”, delivered in collaboration with the World Resources Institute (WRI), that aimed to enlighten participants on the importance of improving countries’ Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs). This class – and several others this year – were delivered through a new format created to adapt the Climate Classroom to the new constraints brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic and allowing participants to connect virtually while keeping the cozy and distinctive ambiance of a regular classroom.

Over the two weeks of COP, 16 classes were held, four of which in-person for delegates attending the conference in Glasgow. They covered a broad range of topics, spanning from climate change communications, climate change education, and climate finance to the gender and climate change, carbon markets and the role of the private sector in addressing the climate crisis. The classes were organized in partnership with UN partners, such as WHO, UN Women, UN Environment, UN Climate Change and UN Human Rights, not-for-profit organizations, like MIET Africa, and WRI, and private companies, Danone and GEMS Education. With content carefully developed by experts, this year’s classes kept over 600 people, among delegates and general public, up-to-speed on climate change issues.

Climate Classroom at COP26

In addition to the Climate Classroom, UN CC:Learn supported two side events with experts and high-level speakers that took place on 11 November 2021: “The Climate Crisis: A Child Rights Crisis”, led by UNICEF, and “Enhancing climate resilience for LDCs and SIDS through space data, finance mechanisms and partnerships”, organized by UNCDF and UNOSAT.

Side event at COP26

The former aimed to provide a platform for youth to express their views and demands at COP26 while encouraging countries to formally acknowledge the key role of children in addressing the climate crisis through their alignment to the Declaration on Children, Youth and Climate Action. The latter explored how science, innovative finance and solutions, and enhanced global partnerships can help raise ambitions in NDCs  and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) and deliver climate adaptation that meets the needs of vulnerable communities in Least Developed Countries (LDCs), Small Island Developing States (SIDS) and African nations.

As in previous years, UN CC:Learn made all the information on its activities at COP available on a dedicated page, which also included a link to the program’s library full of UN resources.

This self-paced e-course provides an overview of the interlinkages between gender, human rights, climate change, and renewable energy. It provides participants with the specific knowledge and tools to integrate and implement gender equality in renewable energy access and entrepreneurship, as well as related gender-responsive and human rights-based approaches in climate change mitigation and adaptation measures.

Enroll
  • Gender
  • Energy
  • Climate Change
  • Education

Self-paced course

6 hours

Welcome!

The deep-rooted and far-reaching impacts of climate change make it one of the most defining challenges in the world today. The impacts of climate change manifest in primary effects such as increased frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events like droughts, storms and floods. However, it is the negative secondary effects that often go overlooked, especially for those who already experience inequalities, including women, youth, the elderly, persons with disabilities and minority groups. 

Multiple and intersecting social inequalities affect the ability of marginalized groups to adapt to a changing climate, excluding these groups from decision-making processes at household, community, and national levels. They also prevent them from taking hold of the opportunities that low-emissions, climate-resilient development brings towards improved livelihoods, particularly in sectors like renewable energy that also have the potential to improve the socio-economic wellbeing of women.

This self-paced e-course provides an overview of the interlinkages between gender, human rights, climate change, and renewable energy. It provides participants with the specific knowledge and tools to integrate and implement gender equality in renewable energy access and entrepreneurship, as well as related gender-responsive and human rights-based approaches in climate change mitigation and adaptation measures. 

What Will You Learn?

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the nexus between gender equality, human rights, renewable energy, and climate change
  • Explain how a gender-responsive and human rights-based approach in climate action leads to economic, social, and environmental benefits
  • Recognize international and sectoral commitments on gender equality, human rights, and climate change and their relationship with national priorities and policies
  • Identify entry points for gender and human rights in renewable energy and climate policy and action
  • Select and apply tools and approaches for the promotion of human rights-based and gender-responsive climate action
  • Discuss targeted opportunities for women in climate change and renewable energy, with a particular focus on multi-stakeholder collaboration, renewable energy entrepreneurship, and access to finance.

The Course at a Glance

 

The course includes 3 modules. These have specific learning objectives and contain a broad range of features such as videos, case studies and exercises. Each module is divided into 4 lessons of around 30 minutes each. 

 

The course provides learners with the option to choose and combine different thematic modules. There are two main learning pathways available that participants can select based on their interests. Pathway 1 is particularly intended for renewable energy experts and professionals of financial institutions. Pathway 2 is designed specifically for climate change and green economy policymakers. Both learning pathways have a common introductory module. Participants can also opt to take all three modules.

Who Should Take This Course?

The course is of particular interest to the following audiences:

  1. National policymakers, government officials and stakeholders in sectors of climate change, gender equality and renewable energy, as well as regional actors;
  2. Renewable energy service providers and officials of financial institutions in renewable energy entrepreneurship;
  3. Anyone interested in learning more about gender equality and human rights-based approaches in the renewable energy sector.

Get a Certificate

Level 1: Each module in the course has a final quiz to assess participants’ understanding of the content. Participants will receive a completion badge via email upon successful completion of each quiz. 

Level 2: Participants who pass all the final quizzes within their learning pathway will receive a UN certificate of completion, where successful completion will require a score of 70% or higher with a maximum of 3 attempts at each quiz. Upon successful completion of the quizzes, participants will be able to download their certificate – or their 2 certificates if they followed all three modules – from the “Certification” section of the course’s webpage.

This course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process. Hence, it has been formulated as a companion to the Guidelines, and we suggest it should be taken as such. 

Enroll
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

3 hours

Background

Considering ecosystem approaches as part of national development planning has always been challenging for many countries around the world. The role ecosystems play in strengthening resilience and broadening livelihood opportunities and economies in the face of climate change has not been sufficiently included in national development agendas. Not until now. With the Paris Agreement, recognizing “the protection of the integrity of ecosystems and biodiversity for both climate change mitigation and adaptation actions” , nature-based solutions (NbS), including ecosystem-based adaptation, for adapting to current and future climate change has come to the fore and countries are eager to find solutions to climate risk that can deliver multiple benefits (social, economic and environmental). Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA), which encompasses the wise use of ecosystem services to help people adapt to climate change, delivers a wide range of benefits that boost overall development and human wellbeing and may contribute to national strategies to respond to the triple crises of biodiversity loss, climate change and the global post-pandemic scenario.

The Guidelines for Integrating EbA into National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) -or EbA guidelines – have been produced as a part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support Programme  (NAP-GSP), implemented jointly by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment  Programme  (UNEP) and funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). In 2013, the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited international actors to draft supplementary sector guidelines to the NAP Technical Guidelines they formulated in 2012, and a number of supplementary guidelines have been published since, including the EbA Guidelines. 

Through its three modules, this course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process. Hence, it has been formulated as a companion to the Guidelines, and we suggest it should be taken as such. 

This self-paced course is a learning initiative of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support  Programme (NAP-GSP) in partnership with Friends of the EbA (FEBA) of IUCN.  

What you will learn?

After completing the course, participants will be able to: 

  1. Explain the importance of restoring/protecting nature and implementing nature-based solutions, such as EbA, for climate change adaptation and sustainable development.
  2. Discuss how integrating EbA into NAPs enables countries to comply with their international environmental commitments such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Sendai Framework, the UNFCCC, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).
  3. Describe how EbA works, including the challenges, opportunities and additional benefits beyond adaptation of securing healthy ecosystems.
  4. Outline how to look for funding opportunities, and how to formulate, implement and mainstream EbA options.
  5. Explain and integrate EbA in the formulation, implementation and review stages of the NAP process.

Course at a Glance

The course is structured around three modules: 

  1. Ecosystem-based Adaptation for climate-resilient development
  2. Steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process
  3. Challenges and advantages of mainstreaming EbA

Who should take this course?

The course will provide clear, concise and current information for anyone interested in understanding the process of integrating Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) into National Adaptation Plans. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  • Technical specialists, policymakers and government officials involved in the national adaptation planning process want to increase their understanding of the steps involved in integrating EbA into NAPs.
  • Technical experts in climate-sensitive sectors with an interest in better understanding how EbA can be integrated into such sectors.
  • Policymakers and technical specialists with an interest in understanding climate adaptation finance and EbA.
  • Academic and wider public stakeholders with an interest in better understanding EbA and how it can be integrated into adaptation planning.

Methodology and Certification

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It has been divided into three modules and includes an intent to use survey.  We recommend that participants take the intent to use survey before starting the course and follow the modules sequentially for the best learning experience. 

Each module contains interactive content and a non-summative assessment to check your understanding.  Each module takes around one hour to complete. The modules also contain a wealth of links to other resources on issues discussed, but these are meant for extra reading if of interest. This extra reading will not be part of the final quiz at the end of each module.  

Each module has a final quiz that aims to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. The assessment contains 10 multiple-choice questions. After passing each module’s final assessment with at least 70% within three attempts, the participant is automatically awarded a badge per module. After obtaining all three badges, the participant can download a UN Certificate of Completion from the ‘Certification’ tab.  

The Building Climate Resilience through Ecosystem-based Adaptation Planning e-course is now available!

Read on to find out how nature-based solutions and ecosystem-based adaptation can be leveraged to deliver climate change adaptation.

Climate change adaptation has been brought to the fore at COP26 as developed countries pledged billions of dollars to help developing nations and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) adapt to climate change. During the negotiations, nature-based solutions (NbS) were often heard as a key factor to be considered when developing adaptation strategies. In this context, ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA), which refers to the use of NbS for adapting to climate change, can be a valuable instrument to deliver a wide range of benefits that boost overall development and human wellbeing, and contribute to national adaptation strategies that respond to the triple crises of biodiversity loss, climate change and the global post-pandemic recovery.

To highlight the importance of EbA in the National Adaptation Planning (NAP) process, UNITAR and UNEP have partnered up to develop the Building Climate Resilience through Ecosystem-based Adaptation Planning e-course as part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP), a joint initiative by UNEP and UNDP.

This new free and self-paced e-learning resource builds on information from the Guidelines for Integrating Ecosystem-based Adaptation into National Adaptation Plans, a publication jointly developed by UNEP, UNDP and IUCN’s Friends of EbA (FEBA), with the purpose of helping adaptation practitioners at national and local levels to factor ecosystem functions and services into a country’s National Adaptation Plan processes and instruments. Through its three interactive modules, comprising videos, texts, quizzes and assessments, this e-course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples, and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process.

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of NbS for climate change adaptation and sustainable development
  2. Discuss how integrating EbA into NAPs enables countries to comply with international commitments (e.g., Paris Agreement, 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction)
  3. Explain how EbA works, including the challenges, opportunities, and additional benefits beyond adaptation of securing healthy ecosystems
  4. Outline how to look for funding opportunities, and how to formulate, implement and mainstream EbA options
  5. Explain and integrate EbA in the formulation, implementation, and review stages of the NAP process

Upon completing the course, participants will receive an official UN Certificate of Completion.

Take the course here today.

UNITAR, WMO, UNFCCC and TEDx Geneva partnered up to organize a TEDx event that put youth and climate change in the spotlight. Read on to find out how a diverse line-up of youth activists, scientists, entrepreneurs and artists spread good ideas on how to scale up climate action.

On 12 November 2021, David Dao stepped on the stage of the CICG, in Geneva, to deliver a powerful message to an audience of 300 people: developed nations must work alongside indigenous communities, who are the stewards of the world’s forests, to halt deforestation and reward those who work tirelessly to preserve the planet’s natural resources. David, who is a scientist at ETH Zurich and the son of two Vietnamese refugees rescued by a German ship in the aftermath of the Vietnam War, believes that indigenous people and refugees play a crucial role in fighting climate change but are often overlooked.

David Dao at The Tide Is Rising

David Dao was part of the line-up of The Tide Is Rising, a TEDx Geneva event supported by UNITAR, WMO and UNFCCC, which brought six youth speakers, a slam poetry artist, and a musician to Geneva, Switzerland, to deliver TEDx Talks on how changing the climate change language can lead to enhanced climate action among broader audiences. The Tide Is Rising was the culmination of 8 months of work, which included several planning and coaching sessions,  and was the second TEDx event co-organized by UNITAR.

The event, which happened against the backdrop of COP26, aimed to spark a discussion on how changing the climate change language could reach and engage more people. Despite being the most important challenge humankind has ever faced, climate change is often perceived as a technical, unrelatable issue, which often hinders understanding and action. The TEDx-style talks, with presentations carefully developed in partnership with a group of volunteer coaches from TEDx Geneva, helped inspire the audience on-site, but will also be turned into videos and made available for everyone on the TED website.

In addition to David Dao, the line-up featured other youth engaged in climate action, such as Léa Geindreau, who is a full-time climate activist based in Paris, and Susana Hancock, an activist and linguist who believes effective climate change communication is all about “how you say it, not what you say”.

‘’Words matter. They create our reality. Metaphors are not working when it’s about climate change’’ – Susana Hancock at The Tide Is Rising.

Art proved to be a compelling way of getting the message across, with slam poetry artist and activist, Florent Mariaud, and West African musician, Djeli Moussa Condé, delivering inspiring performances that got the audience hooked. Youth scientists Dimitrios Terzis and Stephen Bell walked the audiences through their innovative solutions and confirmed that climate change action and innovation walk hand in hand. The power of language and young people as catalyzers of change was highlighted by Amy Meek, a 18-year-old activist who founded “Kids Against Plastic”, a UK-based charity working with over 1,000 schools to address the plastic waste issue.

TEDx Geneva crew, volunteers and partners.

After the event, guests were invited to attend a post-event reception at CICG itself, where they met and interacted with the speakers, and got an opportunity to network with the rest of the audience.

Read The Tide Is Rising’s full programme here.

This online course unpacks the interlinkages between climate change, peace and security and explores opportunities for promoting inclusive climate action, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. Recognizing that challenges associated with climate change and insecurity do not impact everyone equally, the course includes a special focus on assessing the ways gender norms and other factors of social identity shape how people from different backgrounds experience and respond to these emerging risks.  

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Gender
  • Education

Self-paced course

4.5 hours

Welcome!

Climate change is considered by many as among the greatest risks for peace and security in the 21st century. As the planet’s temperature rises, extended droughts, rising sea levels, and more frequent and intense storms are affecting the lives and livelihoods of people in all corners of the globe. Particularly in conflict-affected settings, these impacts can compound economic, social or political drivers of insecurity, leaving already vulnerable populations on the frontlines of multiple, intersecting crises.

This self-paced, online course unpacks the interlinkages between climate change, peace and security and explores opportunities for promoting inclusive climate action, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. Recognizing that challenges associated with climate change and insecurity do not impact everyone equally, the course includes a special focus on assessing the ways gender norms and other factors of social identity shape how people from different backgrounds experience and respond to these emerging risks.  

Upon completion, course participants will be equipped with the knowledge and tools to analyze different contexts affected by climate change and insecurity, and design interventions to prevent and manage associated risks.

This course is designed to benefit a broad range of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. The more advanced modules are particularly relevant for political analysts and peacebuilding practitioners, climate adaptation specialists, and gender and inclusion advisors.

Course structure

The course includes 3 self-standing modules:

  • Module 1: Climate Change, Peace and Security
  • Module 2: Conducting Integrated Analysis
  • Module 3: Entry Points for Policymaking and Programme Design

What will you learn?

  • To identify climate-related security risks and their impacts on different groups of people
  • To conduct integrated conflict and climate analysis, including by using a gender and social inclusion lens
  • To design policies, strategies, and programmatic interventions that integrate climate change, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and gender equality objectives

Who is this course for?

Everyone is invited to take the course, which is designed to benefit a broad range of policymakers, practitioners and researchers. The more advanced modules are particularly relevant for:

 

  • Political analysts and peacebuilding practitioners
  • Climate adaptation specialists
  • Gender and inclusion advisors

 

Will you get a certificate?

The course features two levels of certification:

 

  • Participants will receive a badge for each module they complete by passing the module’s final quiz.
  • Participants who pass all three final quizzes will be issued a certificate of completion.

 

A quiz is successfully passed at a score of 70% or higher. Completion certificates will be available for download from the course’s webpage.

This course Mastering National Adaptation Plans: from Start to Finish course will introduce learners to several important aspects of the NAP process.  It is aimed at enhancing knowledge of the NAP process elements,  relevant issues such as gender and climate information in NAP Formulation and Implementation; and financing NAP processes.   This interactive self-paced course will guide learners through various aspects of the NAP journey.

Enroll
  • Adaptation
  • Climate Change
  • Education

Self-paced course

3 hours

Welcome!

The adverse impacts of climate change are becoming increasingly more acute, particularly for developing countries. This further exacerbates the wellbeing of the poorest and most vulnerable, meaning adaptation is now crucial to their survival and protection. Successful national adaptation planning requires detailed knowledge and practical skills in order to effectively and efficiently tackle current and future threats. 

The National Adaptation Plan (NAPs) process was established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (2010) in order to prepare countries for addressing climate risk in the medium term. The main objectives of the NAPs are to reduce vulnerability to climate change, and to mainstream climate change adaptation in all levels of planning.  NAPs require building a stronger evidence base, improving skills and capacity.  Additionally need to be country-driven, gender-sensitive, participatory, and use transparent approaches. 

This course Mastering National Adaptation Plans: from Start to Finish course will introduce learners to several important aspects of the NAP process.  It is aimed at enhancing knowledge of the NAP process elements,  relevant issues such as gender and climate information in NAP Formulation and Implementation; and financing NAP processes.   This interactive self-paced course will guide learners through various aspects of the NAP journey.

What will you learn?

By completing the course, participants will be able to: 

  • Discuss the importance of inclusion of various stakeholders and institutions in the NAP process.
  • List some examples of important climate data and information necessary for the NAP process, as well as discuss their possible sources locally and internationally.
  • Explain how climate change adaptation planning could be integrated across different climate-sensitive socio-economic sectors.
  • Discuss common national and international sources of climate adaptation finance relevant for the NAPs.

Course at a glance

The course consists of three interlinked modules each taking an average of 1 hour to complete:   

  • Module 1: Exploring and Developing a NAP
  • Module 2: Implementing and Reviewing a NAP
  • Module 3: Financing the NAP process

Who should take this course?

The course will provide clear, concise, and up-to-date information for anybody interested in exploring the important aspects of the NAP process. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  • Policymakers and government officials from LDCs and other developing countries working on NAPs wanting to increase their understanding on the steps involved in national adaptation planning, and the challenges that may arise along the way
  • Technical experts in climate-sensitive sectors with an interest in better understanding the cross-sectoral linkages between climate change and their sectors
  • Policymakers and technical specialists with an interest in understanding climate adaptation finance
  • Academic and wider public stakeholders interested in enhancing their knowledge on the process of adaptation

Methodology

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It has been divided into three modules.  We recommend that you view the modules sequentially for the best learning experience, starting with Module 1 which focuses on the formulation and planning phases of the NAP process; Module 2 focuses on the implementation and review phases of the NAP process and ends with Module 3 which focuses on financing the NAP process.  

Each module contains interactive content and a non-summative assessment to check your understanding.  Each module takes around 1 hour to complete. The modules also contain a wealth of links to other resources on issues discussed, but these are meant for extra reading if of interest. This extra reading will not be part of the final quiz at the end of each Module.  

Each module has a final quiz that aims to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. The assessment contains 10 multiple-choice questions. After passing each module’s final assessment with at least 70% of correct answers within 3 attempts, the participant automatically unlocks a badge per module. After obtaining all 3 badges for each module, the participant can automatically download a UN Certificate of Completion from the Certification tab.  

Climate change is increasingly affecting peace and security across the globe, and factors, such as gender and social inequalities, are catalysing the effects of this dire trend. How can one help prevent climate change from further disrupting peace and security? The answer is unveiled in this brand new e-course, of which Module 1 is already available for enrolment.

 

Read on and find out more about “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens”.

Climate change has been called “the defining issue of our time.” We know that global temperatures are increasing – melting glaciers, raising sea levels, and causing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. But how are these changes impacting peace and security? And how do social factors, such as gender and other inequalities, also affect this nexus?

That’s what the online course on “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens” aims to unravel. This e-course has been jointly developed by UN CC:Learn, UNEP, UN Women, UNDPPA, UNDP and Adelphi, and presents a new and engaging opportunity to explore and unpack these complex interactions.

As one of the biggest challenges facing humanity in the 21st century, climate change poses serious risks to peace and security. The impacts of rising temperatures are already disrupting lives and livelihoods across the world, and forecasts predict that this situation will only worsen over time – leading, for instance, to extreme weather events, food insecurity due to lower agricultural outputs, and mass displacements of people. Meanwhile, the impacts of climate change do not affect everyone equally, with fragile contexts and vulnerable groups already being disproportionately affected.

However, by considering the interdependent and interconnected nature of these risks, it is possible to not only address these but to also discover new opportunities for conflict prevention, peacebuilding, climate adaptation, and gender equality or social inclusion – achieving even greater impact. Through an interactive, free and self-paced learning experience, “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens” provides the knowledge and tools needed to analyse and identify such opportunities, for promoting inclusive climate, conflict prevention and peacebuilding interventions in specific contexts.

The course is divided into three modules, with a progressively in-depth focus:

  • M1: Climate Change, Peace and Security
  • M2: Conducting Integrated Analysis
  • M3: Entry Points for Policymaking and Programme Design

This course is primarily designed to empower policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. However, anyone that has a background or is interested in these topics can also benefit from it.

Overall, the course will take around 4,5h to be completed, enabling participants to:

  • Identify climate-related security risks and their impacts on different groups of people
  • Conduct integrated conflict and climate analysis, including by using a gender and social inclusion lens
  • Design policies, strategies, and programmatic interventions that integrate climate change, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and gender equality objectives

Users completing each module will receive a badge, while participants successfully finalizing the entire course will be awarded a UN certificate.

The first module has just been made available on UN CC:e-Learn, and the other two will be released in the coming months. “Module 1: Climate Change, Peace and Security” was designed for a broader audience and unpacks the interlinkages between these three topics, while introducing the core concepts and principles that are essential for understanding and addressing compound climate-security risks

Take Module 1 TODAY here.