How effective can putting a price on carbon be in the fight against climate change? That’s what you will find out in our course on Carbon Taxation.

 

This 12-hour, self-paced course walks you through the ins and outs of carbon tax and explains the social, economic and environmental benefits that can come from it. Interested? Take the course today to start learning more about carbon taxes.

For centuries, carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases (GHGs) have been driving anthropogenic climate change. If the world is to reign in the devastating effects of rising temperatures, countries need to step up their efforts to halt carbon emissions. But how can they do that? Putting a price on carbon may be an integral part of the answer. Several countries across the globe have implemented carbon taxes or intend to do so. Currently, there are 64 carbon pricing initiatives in place, covering 22.3% of global GHG emissions.

Mindful of the untapped opportunities that carbon pricing presents, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and the World Bank have come together to develop a course which lays out the ins and outs of carbon taxes. The self-paced, free online course “Carbon Taxation” invites users to learn how carbon taxes work while examining the social, economic and environmental benefits that can stem from this policy tool. This course is divided into 5 modules and takes and estimated time of 12 hours to be completed.

The social cost of one ton of carbon emissions.

During the course, users will learn about different designs that can be used to price carbon. Moreover, they will see that carbon taxes can become an important revenue source, providing crucial funding for governments’ numerous development objectives. By implementing a carbon tax, governments ensure that “bads” such as emissions have an adequate price while protecting the “goods” within a society, such as a clean environment and employment.

After completing this course, users will be able to:

  • Describe how carbon taxes work in reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Outline key considerations that shape the decision to adopt carbon taxes
  • Summarize approaches for determining the carbon tax base and rate
  • Differentiate main undesirable effects and mitigation measures
  • List options for revenue use

Despite not requiring any prior knowledge of the subject, this course primarily targets people who want to build a solid understanding of carbon taxation. People who may benefit greatly from the content of this course are:

  • Stakeholders who wish to follow the global discourse on carbon taxation or who are involved in designing and implementing carbon taxes
  • Mid-level project developers and policy makers such as representatives from Ministries
  • Technical experts and practitioners engaged in country-level work within the PMR

The course was developed to keep you engaged at all times. Over the five modules, you will be presented with interactive activities, quizzes and media. While a modular learning sequence is proposed, users can select modules based on individual preferences. The modules are completed with the purpose of achieving module-specific learning objectives. For the most curious learners, publications and relevant databases will be provided along the way.

The course is available on UN CC:Learn e-Learning Platform and is currently available in English. Upon successful completion, users will get an official UN CC:Learn Certificate of Completion.

Jaz Randhawa is a young 25-years-old student from Singapore who uses technology in her favor to raise awareness on climate change. She decided to enroll in our NAP-Ag MOOC and have learned more about climate change and how the rising temperatures are affecting the world’s land, water, and air. As a millennial, she doesn’t miss an opportunity to become a proactive member of her community and is already making a difference in her country.

Perhaps mine is not a story of what I do now to make a difference, but rather my goal, my dream, and what I aspire to be. Taking this course in climate change was my first real step in understanding what needs to be done and how people are making progress every day.”

Jaz Randhawa /©Jaz Randhawa

I found this course incredible in a variety of ways — how the content was interjected with real-life stories of people who are working hard to make a better world for all, having quizzes to make sure knowledge is retained, and the peer assessments.

The peer assessments, seem to have been her favorite. This unique learning tool asks participants to develop their own agriculture adaptation projects and share their work with their fellow learners for feedback and support.

Sentosa, Singapore

Through her peer assignment work, Jaz found that multiple adaption projects are currently underway that curtail low water supply by developing water reservoirs in-country and abroad in Malaysia. But these were not enough. For her,

Are you also using technology to tackle climate change? Spread the word, and tell us what difference are you making in your community or country. Share your story with us on Twitter, Instagram and Facebook!

Today, carbon taxes cover a broad range of sectors and include novel features, demonstrating their ability to adapt to varying policy goals and national contexts. The versatility of carbon taxes also means that policymakers need a clear picture of the available options and how those options fit with the jurisdiction’s context and objectives. This online course provides a first step in understanding the carbon tax landscape.

Enroll
  • Finance
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

Putting a price on carbon involves a fair amount of analysis and consultation with stakeholders. The overall goal of the course is to familiarize learners with underlying market dynamics, policy design options and relevant terminology. While the course is introductory in nature, learners will benefit greatly from a pre-existing understanding of:

  • The functioning of market economies, including basic concepts such as rational agency, the influence of prices on supply and demand, and investments
  • The role of public policy in shaping economic, social and environmental outcomes and achieving international and national commitments

This pre-existing knowledge is not a prerequisite to take the course. You are invited to enroll even if you believe you’re new to the topic!

What will you learn

Upon completion, you will be able to:

  • Describe how carbon taxes work in reducing greenhouse gas emissions
  • Outline key considerations that shape the decision to adopt carbon taxes
  • Summarize approaches for determining the carbon tax base and rate
  • Differentiate main undesirable effects and mitigation measures
  • List options for revenue use

Course at a glance

While being introduced to conceptual considerations of carbon taxation and its underlying economics, you will also benefit from exposure to a variety of case studies and international carbon pricing practices. The discussions take into account strategic aspects of the political environments in which carbon taxes function.

Module 1: Carbon taxes – Why and when to use them
Module 2: Preparing for carbon tax adoption
Module 3: Key design decisions
Module 4: Avoiding unwanted effects of the carbon tax
Module 5: Use of revenues

Get your certificate

Upon completing all five modules and passing the final quiz, you receive a certificate showing your understanding of the topic. Further details on how to obtain the certificate are presented in the course’s “Certification” section.

Partnership and contributors

Responding to the knowledge and skills needs of policymakers, the World Bank’s Partnership for Market Readiness (PMR) and United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) jointly developed this online course with contributions from Climate Focus and Gnarly Tree Sustainability Institute.

In celebration of World Food Day, UN CC:Learn and Danone launched the Sustainable Diet e-course in Portuguese. The course has been taken by more than 12,000 learners from all over the world and it can be found at UN CC:e-learn platform.

Food systems are simultaneously a leading cause of environmental degradation and depletion of natural resources. Currently, food systems are responsible for a significant 20 percent of greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions and are a major driver of land conversion, deforestation and loss of biodiversity.  Agriculture alone accounts for roughly 70 percent of global freshwater withdrawals and water pollution and is responsible for 80 percent of worldwide deforestation.

With the world’s population predicted to expand to 9.7 billion individuals by 2050, these environmental impacts do not make current food systems sustainable. According to the most recent report published in 2019 by The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC):

Consumption of healthy and sustainable diets presents major opportunities for reducing GHG emissions from food systems and improving health outcomes”

The food system embodies a complex chain that includes environmental, social and economic outcomes to provide food that comprises diets. Healthy diets generally encompass dietary goals defined in terms of nutrient adequacy, intake of specified food groups and adherence to a dietary pattern. Sustainable diets, however, are more than the sum of nutrients and foods consumed as they are strongly conditioned by the ways food is produced, distributed, marketed, chosen, prepared and consumed.

According to FAO (2019), the aims of sustainable diets are: to achieve optimal growth and development of all individuals; to support functioning and physical, mental, and social wellbeing at all life stages for present and future generations; to prevent all forms of malnutrition; to reduce the risk of diet-related non-communicable diseases, and to support the preservation of biodiversity and planetary health. Sustainable and healthy diets must combine all the dimensions of sustainability to avoid unintended consequences.

In this context, UN CC:Learn and Danone launched the Sustainable Diet e-course. This course is now translated into Portuguese and aims of helping people decide on choices that can promote real changes in their health and our planet.

Our role is to motivate people, through this food revolution, to make their choices considering the positive impact they can have on their health, on their community and on the planet” – said Edson Higo, CEO of Danone Brazil

The e-course is free of charge and has eight interactive modules which include videos, factsheets, and activities. The course identifies ways in which changing your diet makes a positive impact and invites the participants to develop a personal plan for a sustainable and healthy diet. This e-course is also available in English and you will receive an official certificate after successfully completing the course. Watch the teaser below and join our learning community today! Registrations are open.

What our learners have said:

I have learned how my diet impacts our planet and affects our health, and also how to start eating healthy and sustainably. A truly inspiring course.” – learner from Brazil

The course is amazing! It’s up-to-date, very simple to browse the site, the videos are really well-made, and the factsheets are so dynamic! Also, the completion marks on the activities were a nice way to motivate me to continue doing the course!” – learner from Brazil

As a professional in the health area, I can properly say that this course truly added value in my knowledge. Now, it is on me to act.” – learner from Kenya

I believe that being part of the sustainable food revolution helps us think how our eating habits and daily choices are affecting our health and the planet. I believe that if we all take this course, things would change favorably since we would have the knowledge to make a healthier and more sustainable choices” – learner from India

Saraswati is a young lady from North Sumatra. Addressing climate change in Indonesia is a priority for her and she believes that raising awareness is key in this process. That’s why she wants to become a climate educator and have been leading a project to introduce children to climate change.

 

By preserving nature, there will be access to more than there was before. That is the way to enjoy nature: taking care of the Earth and by doing this, it will allow our children to be taken care of.” — Ms. Saraswati

By Ms. Saraswati /©UN CC:Learn

By Ms. Saraswati /©UN CC:Learn

Project website: Bamboo Workshop

Saraswati is a 24-year-old young lady from North Sumatra and has a Batak ethnic background. Addressing climate change in Indonesia is a priority for Saraswati. Raising awareness is key in this process. That’s why she leads a project to introduce children to climate change, as they are the future generation who will live with its impacts. Saraswati teaches children to use bamboo instead of wood through craft making, in order to tackle deforestation and land degradation. She wants to be a climate educator to help change people’s behaviours and lifestyles so they can be more eco-friendly by providing them accurate climate information. At the Tribal Climate Camp, she learned strategies to develop climate change plans, which she can use to make her dream of climate education come true.

YLCCC 2017 top thee students, awarded by Dr Shahbaz Khan, Director and Representative, UNESCO Regional Science Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, win sponsorship for Tribal Climate Camp, in the USA. /©UN CC:Learn

YLCCC 2017 top thee students, awarded by Dr Shahbaz Khan, Director and Representative, UNESCO Regional Science Bureau for Asia and the Pacific, win sponsorship for Tribal Climate Camp, in the USA. /©UN CC:Learn

1. What issues are you trying to solve and how do you think you can contribute?

Climate change can affect the environmental balance on Earth and it has become a much-discussed topic. However, there are still many people that don’t realise this. This, together with lack of information, affects policy-making and action. Among environmental issues, deforestation has very negative impacts. Substituting wood by bamboo can decrease forest degradation. However, bamboo with certain processing techniques can be as the strong as wood. Providing this information to people, particularly to children, can have benefits. Therefore, through an interactive workshop, we communicated about climate change and deforestation to primary students at the International Humanity Foundation Medan Center in Indonesia. Children in primary schools are our main target, as they are the ones who will face the risks of climate change’s impact in the future and need to be educated as early as possible. Introducing and training them on climate change and creating crafts from bamboo help the awareness of natural environment. Being part of the environment, children can learn about consumption and waste disposal in a correct manner.

Ms. Saraswati with two other students at the Tribal Climate Camp in Eatonville, United States. /©UN CC:Learn

Ms. Saraswati with two other students at the Tribal Climate Camp in Eatonville, United States. /©UN CC:Learn

2. How do you think you can address climate change?

As the 5th world’s largest emitter of greenhouse gases (GHG), Indonesia aims at reducing 26% of its emissions by 2020 and 46% by 2030. The challenge of Indonesia is how to build strategies to address climate change and its impact. Real action needs to happen at all levels, from government to local community based efforts. However, many people in Indonesia are still lacking information of climate change risks and may not realize the effect of climate change. Climate education is one of the solutions for this problem and much needed to increase awareness. Therefore, I would like to dedicate myself to becoming a climate educator in the future. I hope climate change becomes a subject in schools so everyone can get more accurate information and increase awareness to change lifestyles to more eco-friendly behaviours. Climate education can be a solution to spread information and to engage more people to take actions on climate change adaptation and mitigation. I believe that education moves slowly but has strong power to change the world.

3. Can you briefly present your experience with the YLCCC?

The Youth Leadership Camp for Climate Change (YLCCC) is the right place to create green leaders. It was a valuable experience as I learned about climate mitigation and adaptation and carbon footprint calculation. We had a training on how to campaign and introduce climate change to others through short movies, e-posters, and social media. Climate change awareness should reach people all over the world!

The Tribal Climate Camp was held at the University of Washington Pack Forest Conference Center in the United States. /©UN CC:Learn

The Tribal Climate Camp was held at the University of Washington Pack Forest Conference Center in the United States. /©UN CC:Learn

4. How was your experience at the Tribal Climate Camp?

I did enjoy every activity at the Tribal Climate Camp. I learned how to develop a strategy plan for climate change, to use climate tools which can help with decision making in climate monitoring, and even to communicate and engage with communities on climate change actions. One of the strategies that I have learned came from Oregon, which will reap rewards — including clean, renewable energy and thousands of good paying jobs all over the state. This strategy can reach more professionals to be involved on climate change adaptation and mitigation. In addition to the discussions, during the camp we also visited the Nisqually Tribe, a salmon hatchery, and Mt. Rainier. These field trips made me enjoy more our nature and be more grateful to be part of this camp. I learned that the right way to enjoy the nature is by taking care of its beauty.

At the TTC, I presented my ethnic culture and explained my team projects. I am part of the Bataks, which is one of ethnicities from North Sumatra. During my presentation, I displayed Ulos, a Bataknese weaving craft symbolizing the “warmth” needed to survive. Giving an ulos to someone means giving respect and love. Then, I presented my “Climate Rangers” team’s group projects. The first project aims to introduce climate change to kids, who are the stakeholders of the future, through a video highlighting how animals lose their habitat because of littering and how planting bamboo is a way to mitigate climate change. The second project consists of teaching kids to make more eco-friendly decisions, such as using bamboo instead of wood, showcasing how to create pen holders with bamboo.

Ms. Saraswati at the Tribal Climate Camp in Eatonville, United States. /©UN CC:Learn

Ms. Saraswati at the Tribal Climate Camp in Eatonville, United States. /©UN CC:Learn

5. What’s your biggest take away from participating in the Tribal Climate Camp?

This Tribal Climate Camp has helped me to build wider international connections, needed to promote climate change awareness. The people I met at the camp provided guidance, knowledge and advice, helped me to advance my future to become a climate change educator, and even become friends. In my long-term planning, I would like to build a school where children can learn about climate change. I know this is not an easy thing to achieve. Administrative work and compiling all the necessary documentation to get permission and funding could be the challenges. One day, I would like to invite the participants of the TCC to work together in building the school, starting from finding the sponsorship until the administration files completion, or even visiting Indonesia to share their experience on climate change to motivate people to be more aware on climate change. I hope someday children will take care of their nature and become climate fighters of the future.

Ms. Saraswati was one of the three young leaders to receive the “Tribal Camp Award” and participated at the Tribal Climate Camp (TCC), hosted near Seattle, United States from 30 July — 4 August, 2017.

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman has over 27 years of experience working for several different international organizations, where his focus has always been nature preservation. He took the REDD+ course which helped him tremendously in training rural Pakistani communities.

Being global citizens of the planet earth, let us join hand in hand to work individually and collectively to fight for global climate change issues. We must act today instead of thinking to do it tomorrow.” — Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman has over 27 years of experience working for several different international organizations, where his focus has always been nature preservation.

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman visited the Kangaroos Garden in Melbourne Australia to observe forest conservation and wild life protection (July 2017)./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman visited the Kangaroos Garden in Melbourne Australia to observe forest conservation and wild life protection (July 2017)./©Ikram Ur Rahman

He is currently serving as a Regional Project Coordinator in the Mountains and Markets Project in the Northern Province of Pakistan, funded by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF). The goal of this project is to use the voluntary certification of non-timber forest products (NTFP) to promote conservation and to help create a market, which benefits existing conservation efforts.

This project provides local stakeholders, who were earning their livelihood with timber products, with the opportunity to become long-term guardians of natural resources, such as medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP).

The global trade value of MAPs is estimated at around 60 billion USD and is expected to grow to 5 trillion USD by 2050, a huge potential market for rural Pakistani communities, considering that the MAP’s value per weight is one of the highest amongst traded plants in Pakistan.

NTFPs Development Nursery for growing and transplanting high value MAP in respective habitats./©Ikram Ur Rahman

NTFPs Development Nursery for growing and transplanting high value MAP in respective habitats./©Ikram Ur Rahman

For this reason, Dr. Rahman is using his expertise in preserving wild origin organic products to support capacity building in rural Pakistani communities. He is training his community in the sustainable collection, post-collection processing, value addition, product development as well as the necessary marketing of NTFPs such as MAPs.

By informing rural communities on the natural and monetary value of resource management and sustainable land use, he is helping the local community to learn about alternative ways of increasing their economic growth, as well as creating awareness about the consequences of tree cutting and timber selling.

Maintaining high value MAP nursery in collaboration with NTFPs Directorate of Forest Department KP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Maintaining high-value MAP nursery in collaboration with NTFPs Directorate of Forest Department KP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

In 2015, Dr. Rahman was at COP21 in Paris. He learned about the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation programme (REDD), which aims at reducing GHG emissions by introducing sustainable forest management in developing countries. Soon after, he observed many REDD related approaches dealing with the mitigation of climate change such as the conservation of existing resources and the enhancement of carbon stock through forestation and afforestation.

He integrated these new concepts into the technical training that he was delivering to the rural Pakistani communities. As he began to gain new knowledge on these topics, he started to do a UN CC:e-Learn course. Specifically, he enrolled in the REDD+ Academy e-Course, which enhanced his knowledge on setting reference levels, monitoring, and stakeholder engagement in forest preservation.

According to Dr. Rahman, these e-courses helped him tremendously in training the rural communities.

I was able to raise awareness in the approach of nature conservation” – he said.

He integrated information related to sustainable forest management and conservation issues into the presentation materials, which provided practicable information for people living in the rural Northern Pakistani areas.

By taking UN CC:e-Learn courses, I was able to grant communities, that committed to NTFP harvests, the access to national and international markets with their products” – he added.

The knowledge transmitted by the UN CC:e-Learn courses constitutes a key economic opportunity for the Northern Pakistani community considering the value of the total MAP market and demonstrates the impact that these courses might have on developing countries’ communities.

MAP collectors granted with safe collection tool kits after their training on sustainable collection of MAP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

MAP collectors granted with safe collection tool kits after their training on the sustainable collection of MAP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Furthermore, Dr. Rahman, currently working under UNDP Pakistan, was rewarded for taking part in this course. After presenting his UN CC:e-Learn certificate to his UNDP supervisor — he was granted a raise, based on the fact that his newly acquired know-how can be used to boost economic benefits for his community by integrating newly learned approaches of nature preservation and resource management. This in turn shows that employers appreciate it when their employees seek ways for continuing learning.

Although Dr. Rahman has come a long way, he still aims to do more. He would like to take a more inclusive approach in his undertakings. This would mean involving women in sustainable resource projects. He also sees a need for educating schoolchildren and students about the importance of nature conservation in order to teach responsible conduct with the environment from an early age on. These two tasks can be supported by taking UN CC:e-Learn courses, namely the Children and Climate Change and an upcoming course on Gender Equality, Women’s Empowerment, and the Environment, both courses provide the opportunity to support Dr. Rahman and his community in their ambitions.

Surveying NTFP status to allocate sustainable harvest quota for different species and declare species for enhanced conservation./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Surveying NTFP status to allocate sustainable harvest quota for different species and declare species for enhanced conservation./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Rahman did not only gain in terms of monetary increments, but he also passed on the knowledge he acquired through UN CC:e-Learn courses to his community. In turn, people are now able to sell their products on the international market. These products provide a steady income to the poor rural communities of Northern Pakistan, and the change in resource use within the community is helping to decrease deforestation and upholding the rich biodiversity in the region.

*Dr. Rahman is currently acting as a Regional Program Coordinator in the Sustainable Land Management Project (SLMP-II) in Khyberpukhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. The story is of 2017 when he was serving in the Mountains & Markets Project as Regional Project Coordinator. Local Communities, UNDP Pakistan, GEF, Ministry of Climate Change and provincial line departments/institutions work together as the key stakeholders in these Projects.

Ou alumni, Mr. Germain Goungounga is an expert who specializes in macroeconomics and environmental statistics. He carries out environmental and social impact assessments for projects that incorporate climate change issues in Burkina Faso. In this story, he tells us how the ‘Introductory e-course on Climate Change’ has contributed to advance his career on the field.

Mr. Germain Goungounga is an expert who specializes in macroeconomics and environmental statistics. He carries out environmental and social impact assessments for projects that incorporate climate change issues in Burkina Faso. Besides his job with a private consultancy firm, Germain works as an independent, self-employed expert consultant.

In five years of professional experience, he has contributed to the design and validation of a number of local development strategies that include the issue of climate change.

What motivated you to take courses on the UN CC:e-Learn platform?

GG: I heard about the Introductory e-course on Climate Change while attending my first course with UNDP. Because economic questions and climate issues cannot be addressed separately, I decided to register for this course in order to extend my expertise to this specific area and be able to integrate both aspects — economic and climate-related — into my work.

In what way has this course changed your life, advanced your career, or increased your income?

GG: First of all, I have gained key insights that help me speak with ease when I participate in panel debates on the issue of climate change. One thing I have noticed is that there is a growing interest in the scientific and intellectual contributions made on this topic.

This course also turned out to be helpful with regards to the Master in Engineering that I am currently completing, since I got the highest grade for a modeling course focusing on the topic of climate change.

In terms of my income, it indeed directly increased since I took this course. Clients are fully satisfied with my work as an independent expert, and they consider that my performance deserves higher remuneration than the amounts initially agreed, which is why, in the end, I systematically receive additional fees for the missions I perform.

High school students participating at the UN CC:Learn classroom preparation event. Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. ©UN CC:Learn/Frederic Ballenegger

High school students participating at the UN CC:Learn classroom preparation event. Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. ©UN CC:Learn/Frederic Ballenegger

What kind of actions have you been taking within your community and at work since you attended this course?

GG: I, of course, continue to work on development projects that take into account climate change issues, which are of particular interest to me. One of the most thrilling aspects of my job is to be able to work alongside the local communities involved in these projects. These experiences are very rewarding and the lessons I learn from such interactions are extremely valuable.

Furthermore, given the increasing role of environmental statistics and their broad scope of application, I plan to create either a research center or a think tank that will specialize in environmental economics, with the aim to produce three different types of data, namely environmental data and statistics, environmental indicators and indices, and economic and environmental accounts.

What message would you like to convey about the importance of education in the field of climate change?

GG: First of all, I would like to stress that climate changes are acknowledged by the scientific community as resulting, to a large extent, from human activity. The increasingly devastating climate events that we have observed over the past years remind us that urgent action is required to address the issue at the global level.

I want to insist here on the critical role of education in mobilizing the international community. Getting behavior patterns to change requires engaging truly impactful information, education, and communication efforts in almost all sectors. It is therefore crucial that governments design national learning strategies that will allow the people to take ownership of the mechanisms by which they can adapt to climate change and mitigate its effects. I call on our political leaders to implement such learning strategies while ensuring consistency with the actions taken at regional and even international levels so that tangible results can be achieved.

Watering a field of vegetables in Kieryaghin village, Burkina Faso, 2013. ©Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Watering a field of vegetables in Kieryaghin village, Burkina Faso, 2013. ©Dominic Chavez/World Bank

Would you recommend this course to other learners and if so, why?

GG: This training course is designed for both students and professionals, and it is an extremely valuable tool for acquiring key knowledge on climate change. It shows us how to question our production and consumption patterns, and most of all, how to take into consideration climate change concerns in our day-to-day lives. Hence, I encourage everyone to use the UN CC:e-Learn platform, especially the young who want to join the fight against climate change.

****

Given the major socio-economic challenges posed by climate change, there is a growing number of project owners who rely on the services of consultancy firms specializing in this field of expertise, which, for Germain, means promising career prospects.

Want to discuss the global challenges posed by climate change with other young people?

 

We are hosting a series of Virtual Youth Climate Dialogues that will bring together young people from all across the globe in a series of discussions about climate change and green economy.

 

Register yourself below to get a chance to participate.

COVID-19 has added even more complexity to the ongoing climate crisis. It’s now time to shift the course that our planet is taking and build a sustainable future.  And this change starts with you! Take part in our series of Virtual Youth Climate Dialogues and get a chance to discuss climate change issues with young people from all over the world!

Young people will be the most affected by the climate crisis. Through our Youth Climate Dialogues, we provide a platform for them to discuss climate change with their peers from all over the world.  And with many schools closed due to the COVID-19 pandemic, these young learners can still continue to contribute to the global climate change debates and influence the COVID-19 recovery plans by ensuring that climate change remains a priority.

Are you interested? Then we invite you to join us in a series of Virtual Youth Climate Dialogues that will be held online with students from several different parts of the world. Our Youth Climate Dialogues are interactive discussions that lead to personal reflection and learning. Don’t miss out on the chance to get different perspectives on climate change and its potential solutions.

Watch the video and get inspired by Yande and Reuben, two youth from Zambia who participated in the YCDs in 2019!

  • Are you between 15 and 35 years old?
  • Are you worried about climate change?
  • Is your community affected by climate change?
  • Do you wish to discuss possible solutions with other youth?
  • Do you have a climate message to share with other youth?
  • Do you have a climate story to tell?

If you have answered YES to any of the questions above, fill out the form below and pick the best date for you.

Over the coming weeks, we’ll screen all the applications and reach out to everyone interested. We look forward to meeting you soon.

Create your own user feedback survey

Kenya

Kenya’s Climate Change Directorate in the Ministry of Environment and Forestry convened stakeholders for a two-part virtual event of the National Planning Workshop that brought together over 50 representatives from government, national education and training institutions, academia and research institutions, civil society, the private sector, UN agencies and development partners. The aim of the workshop was to foster discussion and stimulate a structured process to develop the National Climate Change Learning Strategy.

 

The National Planning Workshop set a collaborative, engaging tone for the subsequent components to develop Kenya’s Learning Strategy including the Assessment of Leaning Needs and Capacities. The virtual workshop took place in October 2020 and featured high-level opening remarks from senior representatives of the key project partners including the Kenya Climate Change Working Group; UN CC:Learn Secretariat and Dr. Pacifica Ogola, Director of the Climate Change Directorate, Ministry of Environment and Forestry who gave remarks on behalf of the Principal Secretary, Dr. Chris Kiptoo.

In Kenya, the economic cost of floods and droughts is estimated to create a long-term fiscal liability equivalent to 3 per cent of GDP each year. Despite glaring evidence, there is still a disconnect between the science, policy and action. As Kenya is in the process of updating its NDC, operationalizing Kenya’s plans and policies will require a skilled population that understands all aspects of climate change. The Learning Strategy therefore is an important tool to achieve Kenya meet its ambitious climate targets.” – Dr. Chirs Kiptoo, Principal Secretary, Ministry of Environment and Forestry”

A key objective of the National Planning Workshop was for stakeholders to identify the broad priority areas and key actors to be engaged in the strategy development process to ensure the strategy is focused and that the subsequent learning actions undertaken create maximum impact with minimum resources. FAO Kenya Representative, Dr. Tobias Takaravasha highlighted the partnership with UNITAR/UN CC:Learn to build on synergies relating to enhancing technical and institutional capacities for adaptation planning and implementation within its NAP-Readiness Programme. In the spirit of South-South exchange, UN CC:Learn Ambassador from Malawi, Ms. Shamiso Najira shared Malawi’s experience and provided some best practice tips to inform Kenya’s strategy development process.

Online Workshop in Kenya

Kenya’s national policies and frameworks on climate change, education and capacity development provide a basis for identification of sectors for the climate change strategy e.g. the NDC and more explicitly in the National Climate Change Action Plan (NCCAP 2018-2022) that identifies capacity development as a critical enabler to achieve the adaptation and mitigation actions in the NCCAP. Stakeholders discussed and proposed priority areas and relevant key actors to be engaged in the strategy development. From the deliberations, five key sectors emerged including education, environment, energy, agriculture and water and three cross-cutting themes: capacity development, public awareness and gender and youth engagement. This will inform the sectors and institutions to be engaged in further defining climate change learning strategy.

Moreover, stakeholders discussed and provided feedback on the methodology and technical team that would drive the strategy which created ownership of the strategy, catalyze collaboration beyond the strategy development process and strengthens implementation. This was followed by a meeting with the Technical Task Team, a core group of state and non-state actors aligned to the priority sectors, to discuss the outcome of the planning workshop. This provided an opportunity to deep-dive into the strategy methodology and agree on the roles and responsibilities of the team in making the strategy a reality.

 

‘Climate education is crucial for raising the ambition we need to address the existential threat of climate change’, said the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres, in celebration of the issuance of 100,000 certificates of course completion on UN CC:e-Learn platform.

Check out the full letter sent by Mr António Guterres to the UN CC:Learn Partnership and its community.

On 18 September 2020, the UN CC:Learn community celebrated the issuance of 100,000 certificates of course completion on our e-learning platform – a milestone for climate literacy worldwide. On this occasion, an event was held with high-level representatives from the United Nations, including the Deputy Executive Secretary of the UNFCCC, Mr. Ovais Sarmad, the Deputy Secretary-General of WMO,  Ms. Elena Manaenkova, the Executive Director of UNITAR, Mr. Nikhil Seth, as well as Ms. Janine Kuriger, Head of Division at the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, Mr. Angus Mackay, Head of the UN CC:Learn Secretariat, Mr. Vincens Cótê and Ms. Cristina Rekakavas, respectively former and current coordinator of the UN CC:Learn programme.

As if this was not enough, we also had the attendance of more than 1,000 alumni from all over the world who joined via Zoom and Youtube. To close this celebration with a golden key, the Secretary-General of the United Nations, António Guterres, congratulated the UN CC:Learn Partnership and its community for this accomplishment. In his message, he also challenged our community to leverage climate literacy around the world to enable individuals, organizations, and societies to mitigate and adapt to climate change.

The task is now to scale up this effort and to build a global movement that can help us fulfill the promise of the Paris Agreement.”

Check out the full message sent by the UN Secretary-General, António Guterres.

 

Climate education is crucial for raising the ambition we need to address the existential threat of climate change.

I have been very encouraged to see the way that educators around the world are becoming more involved in climate change, in particular, because of the increasing role of youth in demanding greater attention to the crisis.

In that spirit, it gives me great pleasure to recognize the work of the One UN Climate Change Learning Partnership.

Since 2010, UN CC:Learn has been making the UN’s vast knowledge and expertise more easily available to people around the world, particularly in developing countries and countries in special circumstances.  The Partnership has now reached a milestone: more than 100,000 learners have successfully completed a free online course — and more than 50 percent of those learners are women.

This adds 100,000 informed voices to the cause, with increased knowledge, skills and, above all, the motivation to advance climate science, sustainable infrastructure design, responsible investment and other key dimensions of this challenge.  The task is now to scale up this effort and to build a global movement that can help us fulfill the promise of the Paris Agreement.  The recently launched “United in Science 2020” report from the World Meteorological Organization is a further contribution, cataloging the crisis and ringing the alarm.

I congratulate the UN CC:Learn partnership on this achievement and thank the Government of Switzerland for its long-standing support for this important work.