Developed in partnership with the REDD+ Academy, this course introduces participants to the basics of REDD+. It includes the elements required under the UNFCCC, how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level, and the financial resources available.

Enroll
  • REDD+
  • Climate Change
  • Science

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

The REDD+ Academy is a coordinated REDD+ capacity development initiative led by the UN-REDD Programme and the UNEP Environmental Education and Training Unit, which seeks to match the scale of the global climate change mitigation challenge and enable systematic, focused capacity development to deliver REDD+ on the ground.

The development of the REDD+ Academy responds to needs expressed by UN-REDD Programme partner countries for a regionally focused education initiative for those involved in national REDD+ programmes.

What you will learn

After completing the course Fundamentals on REDD+, you will be able to:

  • Explain the role of deforestation and forest degradation in the process of climate change;
  • Define REDD+ aspects in the context of the UNFCCC;
  • Explain the importance of analysing and prioritizing direct and indirect drivers of deforestation and forest degradation;
  • Explain the relationship between policies and measures (PAMs) and the five REDD+ activities;
  • Describe the process of developing a National REDD+ Strategy or Action Plan;
  • Identify the variety of perceptions of REDD+ finance in each of the three REDD+ phases.

The coure at a glance

The course on Fundamentals on REDD+ is structured around six modules. The first three modules present a general introduction on the topic. The last three modules present various REDD+ elements which are required under the UNFCCC and how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level, including what financial resources are available.

  1. Forest, Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change;
  2. Understanding REDD+ and the UNFCCC;
  3. Drivers of Deforestation and Forest Degradation;
  4. Policies and Measures for REDD+ Implementation;
  5. National Strategies and Action Plans; 6. REDD+ Finance.

Completion requirements

The quizzes can be completed at any time. They assess the achievement of the learning objectives for each module. Each quiz can be attempted a maximum of three times. Passing a quiz with at least 70% rewards learners with a badge associated to the specific module. Once the six quizzes are passed, and learners obtain all the six badges available, they can download a certificate of completion from the course home page.

Partners

The modules have been developed and peer-reviewed by UN-REDD and UN CC:Learn.

Developed in partnership with the REDD+ Academy, this course deals in greater detail with three REDD+ elements, including monitoring systems and safeguards. It also discusses best practices for engaging stakeholders in REDD+ processes and key principles of good governance.

Enroll
  • REDD+
  • Climate Change
  • Science

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

The REDD+ Academy is a coordinated REDD+ capacity development initiative led by the UN-REDD Programme and the UN Environment Environmental Education and Training Unit, which seeks to match the scale of the global climate change mitigation challenge and enable systematic, focused capacity development to deliver REDD+ on the ground.

The development of the REDD+ Academy responds to needs expressed by UN-REDD Programme partner countries for a regionally focused education initiative for those involved in national REDD+ programmes.

What you will learn

After completing the course Advancing on REDD+, you will be able to:

  • Describe the process and objectives of developing a National Forest Monitoring System;
  • Explain the importance of developing Forest Reference [Emission] Levels (FRELs/FRLs);
  • Explain the need for Safeguard Information Systems in REDD+ implementation;
  • Describe the characteristics of an Incentive Allocation System;
  • Describe the importance of stakeholder engagement for successful REDD+ implementation;
  • Describe the underlying governance factors that can affect REDD+ implementation.

The course at a glance

The Advancing on REDD+ course is structured around six modules. While how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level through a National Strategy or Action Plan, including financial resources available, is discussed in the course Fundamentals on REDD+, the Advancing on REDD+ course presents the other three REDD+ elements, to which it adds the importance of engaging the relevant stakeholders in the process and the principles of good governance.

The six modules are as follows:

  1. National Forest Monitoring Systems for REDD+;
  2. Forest Reference Emission Levels (FRELs);
  3. REDD+ Safeguards under the UNFCCC;
  4. Approaches for the Allocation of Incentives;
  5. Stakeholder Engagement in REDD+; 6. Good Governance.

Completion requirements

The quizzes can be completed at any time. They assess the achievement of the learning objectives for each module. Each quiz can be attempted a maximum of three times. Passing a quiz with at least 70% rewards learners with a badge associated to the specific module. Once the six quizzes are passed, and learners obtain all the six badges available, they can download a certificate of completion from the course home page.

Partners

The modules have been developed and peer-reviewed by UN-REDD and UN CC:Learn.

Zimbabwe has finalized its Climate Change Learning Strategy and taken concrete steps towards its implementation. The country, which started developing its Strategy in 2019, hosted an event on 11 September that brought together stakeholders drawn from across the country to validate the document and work towards its implementation.

On the 11th September 2020, the Ministry of Environment, Climate, Tourism and Hospitality Industry, in collaboration with UN CC:Learn and UNDP Zimbabwe, held the National Climate Change Learning (NCCL) Strategy Validation workshop to bring stakeholders together to validate the draft NCCL Strategy to deliver climate change learning and capacity development in the country.

The one-day event was held in Bulawayo and drew together representatives from various stakeholder groups, including government, the private sector, CSOs, educational and vocational training institutions.  In compliance with national COVID-19 protective measures, participation was limited to only 50 participants.  Virtual participation was organized for those who were not able to attend in person, including representatives from the UN CC:Learn Secretariat in Geneva and MIET Africa.

In his opening remarks, Mr Angus Mackay, Head of the UN CC:Learn Secretariat congratulated the Ministry of Environment, Climate, Tourism and Hospitality Industry on the excellent work done in developing Zimbabwe’s first National Climate Change Learning Strategy, despite the challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. He underlined the importance of building climate change knowledge and skills across society so as to provide a ‘sea of learning and knowledge’. He further welcomed the engagement of the education sector in the meeting and process, including schools and teachers, as a key means of building up Zimbabwe’s response to climate change and promote climate action. He also stressed the importance of taking a wholesale approach to professional training by engaging national training institutions and universities in order to make climate change training systematic, recurrent and sustainable.

Welcome remarks were delivered by Mr. Washington Zhakata, Director for the Climate Change Management Department in the Ministry of Environment, Climate, Tourism and Hospitality Industry. He reminded the participants that the climate will not stop changing because of the COVID-19 pandemic, so there is still a pressing and ongoing need to continue taking climate action and the role everyone has to play in steeping it up. With the country being negatively impacted by climate change, there is a need to climate-proof all socio-economic sectors and enhance preparedness. He emphasized that tackling the climate change challenge requires new ways of thinking, new approaches to development and new partnerships across all sectors, all nations and all societies. Stakeholders were urged to be responsible and work together to promote climate-friendly ways of doing things and this NCCL strategy comes at a good time to do that.

Specific objectives of the workshop include:

  1. To discuss and validate the National Climate Change Learning Strategy and check that it includes and has incorporated all stakeholders’ inputs;
  2. To review the Monitoring and Evaluation Framework and an Implementation Plan for the NCCL Strategy;
  3. To discuss next steps on the implementation of priority actions and financial plan for the NCCL Strategy

Sticking to the five priority sectors of the NCCL strategy, participants discussed the Action Plan; the M&E and to come up with a resources mobilization plan that would help finance the various activities in the strategy.  Some questions to lead the group discussions included: e:

  1. Is the proposed action feasible?
  2. Is the draft budget proposed enough? What do you think would be the sources of funds in addition to those proposed?
  3. In addition to the cooperating partners proposed, who else do you recommend being added?
  4. Are you agreeable to the proposed target audience for the action, who else can be added?
  5. What do you think are the potential financial mechanisms to support the implementation of actions proposed in the Strategy?
  6. What are your general comments on the Strategy? Do you adopt it? Are there any areas for improvement?

A number of recommendations were given towards the finalization of the strategy with the aim of finalizing and launching it by mid-October 2020. Implementation of the strategy will kickstart in parallel with the finalization process with two priority actions planned to start immediately.  The actions are deemed as quick wins which can ride upon other complementing activities already on-going within the country in the sectors prioritized:   i) Mainstreaming Climate Change into Teacher Training in Zimbabwe; and ii) Capacity building of rural youth groups and youth organizations.

At the event, MIET Africa also gave a presentation on its response to the impact of Covid-19 on its activities. Participants got a glimpse of the FutureLife-Now programme and the benefits that are coming from it. The impact of Covid-19 on FutureLife Now Programme implementation was also addressed. In addition, MIET Africa laid out the new ways in which they are trying to reach a broader number of stakeholders. These comprise radio programmes, sms messaging, print materials, and journals

Zimbabwe joined the UN CC:Learn Programme to scale up the efforts being done to strengthen climate change learning within the country. The National Climate Change Learning strategy being devised in partnership with UN CC:Learn aims to advance the Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC) and the National Adaptation Plan (NAP), which would further help Zimbabwe address the several challenges posed by climate change, such as extreme weather events.

UN CC:Learn has reached an important milestone: the issuance of 100,000 certificates of course completion from its e-learning platform. And to acknowledge this important accomplishment, an online event was hosted on 18 September. For one hour, people who are part of UN CC:Learn history engaged in discussions about the program, its results, and its future.

In September 2020, UN CC:Learn achieved an important milestone: the issuance of the 100,000th certificate of course completion on its e-learning platform. This special certificate was issued on 11 September 2020 to a who had successfully concluded the Green Fiscal Policy course. In order to acknowledge this important accomplishment, an event – which was held on 18 September 2020 – brought together people both virtually and in-person to discuss the partnership and the challenges of promoting climate literacy.

The event was hosted on Zoom and live-streamed on YouTube. 15 people attended the ceremony in-person and over 1,000 people followed it online. The line-up comprised individuals who have contributed to UN CC:Learn history: Mr. Nikhil Seth, UNITAR’s Executive Director, who highlighted the importance of continuing to promote global climate literacy in innovative ways, Mr. Angus Mackay, Head of the UN CC:Learn Secretariat, who noted the increasingly different audience currently following UN CC:Learn’s courses, Mr. Vincens Coté, who was the programme’s coordinator from 2014 to 2017 and recalled how it all started 5 years ago, and Ms. Janine Kuriger, Head of the Global Programme Climate Change and Environment at the Swiss Agency for Development and Cooperation, who reflected on this milestone and perspectives for the future.

Some partner agencies also joined the celebration. Mr. Ovais Sarmad, Deputy Executive Secretary at the UN Climate Change Secretariat talked about the contribution that UN CC:Learn is giving to the fight against the climate crisis and thanked everyone who took some time to complete one of the 27 e-courses available. Representing the World Meteorological Organization, Dr. Elena Manaenkova, who acts as Deputy Secretary-General at the organization, noted the evolution of the program since its very early stages and its relevance for one UN collaboration in the area of climate change learning, stressing WMO’s support. The event was moderated by Ms. Cristina Rekakavas, UN CC:Learn program coordinator.

As part of the event, a “behind the scenes” video was screened with the purpose of walking viewers through the processes behind the program’s course development, giving them a glimpse of the everyday work being done by the UN CC:Learn Secretariat.

To conclude the event, UN CC:Learn launched a new challenge, engaging the 400,000 UN CC:Learn alumni to take part in the “100k Stories for Climate Action” initiative, which will last for one month and will reward the best 10 stories.

You can access the recordings of the event here.

 

As part of their effort to integrate climate change education in Malawi’s primary school curricula, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of Malawi recently launched a publication called Climate Change Sourcebook for Primary School Teachers.

Providing tools to support teachers is essential in order to promote climate change education in schools. As part of their effort to integrate climate change education in Malawi’s primary school curricula, the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology of Malawi recently launched a publication called Climate Change Sourcebook for Primary School Teachers. The book was developed by specialists from the Ministry of Education, Science and Technology, Malawi Institute of Education (MIE), the Environmental Affairs Department, academia, practising teachers and primary education advisors. It was trial-tested with primary school teachers in Zomba, Machinga and Kasungu districts and then refined again. 22,300 copies have been distributed to primary schools so far.

The sourcebook is divided into seven units. The units touch on backgroung information on climate change, how greenhouse gases contribute to climate change, human activities that increase greenhouse gases, impact and effects of climate change, mitigation, adaptation and suggested activities that learners can do to mitigate climate change. Each unit of the sourcebook offers a variety of participatory methods, visual illustrations and practical activities.

The sourcebook represents an essential tool to promote behavior-change among a whole generation of young Malawians. It facilitates the transmission process of key knowledge, skills and attitudes from teachers to school children, supporting present and future generations in taking action to mitigate the causes and adapt to the adverse effects of climate change.

This book complements an educational poster that aimed at raising children’s awareness on climate change and which was distributed to all primary schools in the country. Both pedagogical documents were produced as part of the implementation of Malawi’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy.

Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. It is now available in English, Spanish and French.

Do you want to find out why promoting gender equality can help deliver better environmental outcomes, and how you can do it? If so, access the online course on gender and environment on the UN CC:Learn e-learning platform. The course was launched at the at the sixth GEF Assembly taking place in Danang, Viet Nam.

This self-paced free course has been developed by UNITAR/UN CC:Learn, the Global Environment Facility (GEF), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP), with valuable contributions from the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN), UN Women, UNDP, UN Environment and the Secretariats of the Multilateral Environmental Agreements that the GEF serves, including the Convention on Biological Diversity, the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification and the Basel, Rotterdam and Stockholm Conventions, among others.

“The Gender and Environment e-course is the first of its kind and it will be a valuable resource for the environmental community in its efforts to be more gender responsive. This course will also help raise awareness and build capacity to implement GEF’s new policy on Gender Equality” said Francoise Clottes, GEF Director of Strategy and Operations.

“UNDP recognizes the transformative potential of gender equality to advance environmental sustainability. The course is an exciting opportunity to broaden understanding of the important links between gender and environment and offers practical tools, evidence and examples to mainstream gender in key environmental sectors.” said Adriana Dinu, Executive Coordinator, UNDP Global Environmental Finance.

“GEF Small Grants Programme (SGP) is delighted to have led and facilitated the development of this useful course with all the partners. We are also excited to feature concrete SGP project examples where local communities have implemented innovative gender responsive projects and produced multiple benefits on both environment and livelihoods.” stated Yoko Watanabe, Global Manager, GEF Small Grants Programme.

The course allows learners to get a better understanding of the linkages between gender equality, women’s empowerment and environmental sustainability. It highlights how gender-responsive policies and projects support environmental outcomes.

This new e-learning resource is comprised of the following 6 modules:

  1. Gender & Environment (introductory module)
  2. Gender & Biodiversity
  3. Gender & Climate Change
  4. Gender & Land Degradation
  5. Gender & International Waters
  6. Gender & Chemicals and Waste

Each module takes around 1-1.5 hours to complete and includes an interactive lesson, with videos, relevant statistics, case studies, exercises/reflection points, key messages and references to additional resources. A quiz at the end of each module allows participants to measure the achievement of the learning objectives.

Take up the course today: English, Spanish and French.

On the 29th and 30th of June, in Koudougou, 38 people from the communications services of the ministerial departments of Burkina Faso, the press and press associations were trained on “Climate change issues for the socio-economic and cultural sectors of Burkina Faso”.

Media play a crucial role in raising public awareness of climate change issues. For this reason, Burkina Faso has defined the training of journalists and communicators as a priority action of its National Climate Change Learning Strategy. On the 29th and 30th of June, in Koudougou, 38 people from the communications services of the ministerial departments of Burkina Faso, the press and press associations were trained on “Climate change issues for the socio-economic and cultural sectors of Burkina Faso “. The workshop was organized by the Permanent Secretariat of the National Council for Sustainable Development (SP-CNDD) with the support of UN CC:Learn.

Participants to the workshop

The meeting, chaired by the Director in charge of Environmental Conventions of SP-CNDD and Coordinator of the UN CC:Learn Initiative in Burkina Faso, Dr Joël Korahiré, as well as by the Director of Communication and Ministerial Press of the Ministry in charge Of Sports, Mr. Sylvain Zingue and the Director of Communication and the Departmental Press of the Department of Transport, Mr. Drissa Sere, focused on:

  • capitalizing on existing knowledge of the participants;
  • concepts and terminology related to meteorology and climate;
  • the characteristics of climate change in Burkina Faso;
  • Burkina Faso’s National Adaptation Plan (NAP);
  • Burkina Faso’s Nationally Determined Contribution (NDC);
  • climate governance in the context of Burkina Faso;
  • international climate negotiations;
  • the political and scientific process related to climate change;
  • the Climate Change Technology Transfer Center and Network.

The Director in charge of communications of the Ministry of Transports,  Mr. Drissa Sere, the Burkina Faso UN CC:Learn coordinator, Dr Joël Korahiré, the Director in charge of communications of the Ministry of Sports, Mr. Sylvain Zingue

Specifically on climate governance, participants have appropriated the concept through exercises on sectors vulnerable to climate change in Burkina Faso. Group work enabled them to identify the stakes of climatic hazards and their implications for economic, social, cultural and local governance.

Working groups during the workshop

At the end of the workshop, the participants made a strong recommendation in relation to the continued need for capacity building on the various themes related to climate change so that they can contribute more to information and awareness-raising activities in accordance with Article 6 of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.

In order to strengthen individual skills and institutional capacities to foster green and climate resilient development, Burkina Faso has launched the National Strategy on Climate Change Learning after implementing a national UN CC:Learn Project from 2014.

Do you know that Burkina Faso was among the first countries to develop a National Adaptation Plan and it hosted the World Day to Combat Desertification last June? Indeed, fighting climate change is still a high-ranking goal for Burkina Faso.

Mrs. Metsi Makhetha, United Nations Resident Coordinator in Burkina Faso congratulates Mr. Nestor Batio Bassiere, Minister of Environment, Green Economy and Climate Change, next to representatives from Ministries of Health, Education and Agriculture.

Burkina Faso has been facing, in the last decades, several extreme weather events, including droughts, flooding, heat waves and intense winds, and thus, is more than ever determined to fight climate change. Indeed, the climate scenario indicates that rainfall should decrease by 3% by 2025 and temperature should increase by 2°C by 2050.

In order to strengthen individual skills and institutional capacities to foster green and climate resilient development, the country has implemented a national UN CC:Learn Project from 2014 to 2017, which has culminated in the launch of the National Strategy on Climate Change learning on the August 1st, 2017.

Around 100 people, representing the different Ministries involved, cooperation partners and UN agencies, gathered in the Ministry of Environment premises to collect their own hard copies of the National Strategy and Action Plan.

Mrs. Metsi Makhetha, the United Nations Resident Coordinator, reminded the audience that the Strategy was the successful result of a long national, inclusive and participative process and that the UN system would fully support the Government in its implementation phase.

Mr. Nestor Batio Bassiere, Burkina Faso Minister of Environment, Green Economy and Climate Change, underlined that the strategy was fully aligned with the National Economic and Social Development Plan (PNDES) implementation, the country’s NDCs and National Adaptation Plan.

The strategy and its action plan revolve around three strategic axes: the institutionalization of climate change learning, capacity building of stakeholders and climate change learning governance. This strategy has been officially validated and launched by the Minister of Environment, Green Economy and Climate Change, and now awaits final adoption by Ministers’ council.

Ms. Delphine Clement presenting UN CC:Learn on behalf of UNITAR.

Participants to the ceremony of the Launch of the National strategy on climate change learning.

Please find more about this event from the video by AFRIQUE’ ERE.

Ethiopia has launched a new national climate change education strategy that seeks to create environmentally conscious citizens through turning, by 2030, every school in the country into champions for building a climate-resilient green economy.

Ethiopia has launched a new national climate change education strategy that seeks to create environmentally conscious citizens through turning, by 2030, every school in the country into champions for building a climate resilient green economy.

Climate change is a living threat to Ethiopia and it was in response to this threat that the Government of Ethiopia developed the Climate Resilient Green Economy Strategy (CRGE) in 2012.

UN CC:Learn initiative in Ethiopia was launched in September 2016 and covers the period from 2017 to 2030. The initiative is not only demand-driven and country-owned, but it’s aligned with the national normative frameworks including the CRGE, the Growth and Transformation plan, as well as education sector policy.

By 2020, the new strategy will enhance the level of integration of climate change education into the formal education system so that schools have greater and more meaningful involvement in the implementation of the CRGE.

Lead government agencies for implementing, monitoring and assessment of the strategy and priority actions are the Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change (MEFCC) and the Ministry of Education (MoE). The United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) supported the development of the strategy and priority actions as well as the stakeholder consultations to ensure national buy-in.

Key intervention areas of the first cycle of the CCE Strategy (2017-2020) include:

  • facilitate setting up of an enabling policy and institutional frameworks at national and sub-national levels with a view to fostering sustainable climate change learning;
  • enhance the level of integration of climate change education in the curricula of the formal education system of Ethiopia;
  • support extra-curricular activities and further the integration of CCE among formal, non-formal and informal education systems.

Other actions prioritized for 2017 include the development of framework document for curricular revision, which will be followed by the production and dissemination of complementary climate change learning resources and teachers’ orientations targeting both primary and secondary education levels.

For further information regarding the Climate Change Education Strategy of Ethiopia 2017-2020, click here

Audrey Ingram Roberts, Executive Director of Source Development Consultants in Nassau, Bahamas, leads her firm with a clear objective: to deliver exceptional Human Resources Development services to facilitate sustainable change, particularly in the areas of organizational development, gender-responsive management systems, and strategic planning.

Ms. Roberts (middle) with two Information and Communications officers of the Bahamas Agriculture & Marine Science Institute (BAMSI). Their motto is ‘GROW WITH US.’ Website: BAMSIBahamas.com. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Early in her career, Audrey worked at the Bureau of Women’s Affairs in Jamaica, which was set up in 1975, and the first of its kind in the Caribbean region. This experience, she says, was a “profoundly significant marker” in her career.

Her work as Rural Coordinator and later as a Project Development Officer gave Audrey an insider’s look to the similarities and differences that women experience in rural and urban settings. Whether it be at a farm or a law firm, women face similar gender-based biases. For Audrey, empowering women spawned in her a commitment to life-long learning.

It started with empowering the staff through personal awareness training and professional development. We extended this training into a wider constituency, to all the women of Jamaica.

Later on, Audrey participated in seminars and events that prepared her for her role in assisting the National Planning Institute of Jamaica to develop the Government’s first Five Year Plan for Women.

On the importance of learning

Last year, Audrey, who is a natural networker, found out about the National Adaptation Plans: Building Climate Resilience in Agriculture (NAP-Ag MOOC) through the Coordinator of the Caribbean Women’s Network, who is always on the lookout for opportunities that might interest members and encourages them to keep learning.

The onions and veggies are products of BAMSI or produced by entrepreneurs trained at BAMSI. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

She enrolled in the NAP-Ag MOOC for many reasons, including the fact that The Bahamas’ fragile ecosystems have been disturbed or even destroyed by development on several islands. From 1990 to 2016, The Bahamas has weathered 16 hurricanes, which are characteristically different, increasingly more intense and devastating. “Hurricane Joaquin (2015) and Hurricane Matthew (2016) highlight the vulnerability of our archipelago to climate events,” Audrey explains to us.

Schoolchildren sampling agro-processed items. Many schoolchildren attended, mostly girls. A few students spoke at the open mike session about their interest in agriculture and are proud of their school farm gardens because they can eat what they grow. Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Her second reason for taking the NAP-Ag MOOC relates directly to her professional role.

As a gender specialist, it is essential to know how to mainstream gender into adaptation planning. Gender-responsive climate change adaptation planning is, for me, the strength of the course. This part of the course deserves an A+ in its delivery, content, concepts and all aspects of skill building.

Audrey says, as far as she is aware there is not a strategic NAP or NAP-Ag for the Commonwealth of The Bahamas. “This became my most compelling reason for taking the course with my eye on certification,” she states.

The NAP-Ag is a new, emerging frontier. “Like all frontiers, it is exciting and challenging. More so if there is no NAP process occurring in the country,” she adds.

Audrey enjoyed the course and found that it inspired a sense of the opportunities in climate change and “dispelled anxiety” about the crisis of climate change by showing what could be done through effective planning.

“The NAP-Ag course has strengthened my capability as a consultant at a time when my country and region need the application of these transformative skills to the rapidly emerging challenges. And it has enhanced my role as an activist in the Caribbean women’s movement.”

Photo: Audrey Roberts.

Do you want to learn more about Audrey’s work? Some of her publications include:

  • Article on Gender Issues in The Bahamas in The Greenwood Encyclopedia of Women’s Issues Worldwide: North America and the Caribbean, Ed. Cheryl Toronto Kalny, Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut & London 2003
  • A Vision for Gender and Development Cooperation, Caribbean Perspectives — an article in A Vision for Gender and Development, the Outcome of an Expert Group Workshop, Stockholm, published by Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Stockholm, Sweden 1996.