Air pollution has been damaging people’s health and contributing to environmental degradation. This newly launched affiliated e-course unpacks the Air Convention and its Protocols and lays out the current efforts by UNECE and its member states to address this issue.

 

Read on to find out more!

Have you ever wondered what causes air pollution? Are you interested in learning about the effects of air pollution on your health and the environment? Do you want to learn how we can jointly work on cleaner air? If you replied yes to any of these questions, then you are encouraged to take the e-learning course on the UNECE Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (Air Convention) and its protocols, which has been launched by UNECE and recently affiliated in both English and Russian by UN CC:Learn.

Air pollution impacts our health, environment and economy. Air pollutants come from multiple sources, such as traffic, industry and agriculture, and are transported over large distances and across borders. It is therefore paramount that we take action together — across sectors and national boundaries.

To improve air quality, UNECE Member States have been working successfully since 1979 to reduce air pollution in the region through the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution. This cooperation has led to emission reductions, cleaner air, healthier forests and prevented premature deaths.

However, more needs to be done to achieve cleaner air within the UNECE region and beyond. The Convention has engaged in fostering cooperation between regional initiatives around the world and shared the Convention’s experience and lessons learnt with a view to advancing a shared response to addressing air pollution globally.

To assist countries in effectively addressing air pollution and improve air quality management, the new affiliated e-learning course aims to raise awareness about air pollution and its effects, ways to prevent and reduce harmful emissions, and the Convention and its protocols as an international framework for cooperation on cleaner air. The course was developed with contributions from the European Union, Germany, and Sweden.

Who should take this course?

The course is primarily designed to build the capacities of policymakers, government officials, staff from intergovernmental/non-governmental organizations, private sector professionals, students/academia, and other stakeholders. In particular, this course will be useful for those who cooperate within the Convention framework or those who wish to do so. Taking this course should enable learners to contribute to, and ultimately drive forward, actions on cleaner air.

Learning objectives

The course features four distinct modules that aim to equip participants with the knowledge and resource materials to understand the main concepts in air pollution management, the basic principles of the Convention, and Parties’ obligations under the Convention and its protocols. The course is self-paced and can be completed according to the schedule of the learner. Each module uses a mix of learning tools and features engaging content with clear storylines, complemented by videos, interactive features, relevant tools, and links to additional resources.

After completing the course, learners will be able to:

  • Identify key air pollutants and their sources and effects
  • Recall measures to reduce and prevent air pollution
  • Recognize the value of the Convention as a framework for international cooperation to reduce air pollution
  • Define basic principles under the Convention and its protocols
  • Explain the basic obligations under the Convention’s protocols
  • Identify the key stakeholders and processes under the Convention and its protocols

Certification and evaluation

To successfully complete the course and gain a Certificate of Completion, participants can take an end-of-course assessment. Once the certification criteria have been met (passing score 70%), and after completing a course evaluation form, participants will be able to download their certificate from the course’s webpage.

Affiliation programme

The UN CC:Learn affiliation programme highlights high-quality e-learning products on climate change developed by recognized institutions outside the framework of the UN CC:Learn programme / without support from the UN CC:Learn Secretariat, in accordance with specific affiliation criteria. The objective of the UN CC:Learn affiliation programme is to enhance global climate literacy through dissemination of high-level learning products that complement UN CC:Learn resources.

Take the course!

Approximately one-third of all food produced globally never gets eaten and is thrown away! Food waste has grave negative consequences that can be traced to poverty, inequality, and climate change.

 

UN CC:Learn and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency have joined forces to make available the new “Food Waste Prevention” e-course, your go-to source of information, tips, and ideas on how to prevent food waste.

 

Read on to find out more!

Did you know that if food waste was a country, it would be the third-biggest greenhouse gas emitter on the planet, just after China and the United States? This dramatic example shows the scale of the problem and the urgent need for action. Governments, companies, and individuals have to dramatically accelerate efforts to meet target SDG 12.3 aimed at halving food loss and waste by 2030. Against this backdrop, UN CC:Learn and the Swedish Environmental Protection Agency have developed the Food Waste Prevention e-course to help everyone – from individual consumers to food producers – save food at all stages of the food chain.

This newly crafted, video-based, interactive e-learning course has 5 modules. Each module focuses on a specific stage of the food chain, including food manufacturing and retailing, food services, and household consumption. At each stage of the food chain, steps can be taken to target, measure, and act to stop food wasted. Practical tools and case studies help learners turn knowledge into actions in their everyday lives and business practices.

This e-course is open to everyone – from beginners to an expert – but it is particularly geared toward learners from emerging economies, such as China, Brazil, South Africa, and India, where consumption habits are quickly changing and setting up food waste prevention systems can have a great impact in the short and long run. Upon completion of the course, participants should be able to: 

  • Define the role key stakeholders play in food waste prevention.
  • Identify ways to measure and account for food waste at various stages of the food chain.
  • Describe effective measures to prevent food waste throughout the food chain.
  • Outline measures to minimize food waste wherever prevention is not possible.

After going through all five modules, learners will be asked to take a quiz and participate in a role-playing game to assess their knowledge. An official UN CC:Learn certificate will be granted to those who complete the course. 

Take the course in English and Portuguese! 

UN CC:Learn and EmPower partnered up to train over 90 people from five Asian countries on the interlinkages between gender equality, human rights, climate action and renewable energy.

 

Read on to get a glimpse of the training.

 

Facilitating women’s access to renewable energy can increase gender equality and enhance the realization of their rights, while boosting climate action. That’s one of the key takeaways from the “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-course, launched in November 2021. As a follow-up UN CC:Learn and EmPower joined forces once again to organize a two-day moderated e-workshop on the topics of the course with the purpose of enabling participants to delve deeper into them.

The “E-Workshop on Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” took place on 6th and 7th April 2022 and brought together 102 people – between participants and speakers – to discuss, among other things, how women’s access to renewable energy can positively affect gender equality, human rights, and climate action. The e-workshop aimed to contextualize the knowledge about these topics while enhancing experience-sharing across the Asia-Pacific region. It primarily focused on five Asian countries: Bangladesh, Cambodia, Indonesia, Sri Lanka, and Viet Nam, and was divided into four main sessions spread across over more than seven hours of training.

The training was designed to achieve the following learning objectives:

Learning Objectives – Slide taken from main presentation.

The sessions were:

  • Session 1: Regional overview
  • Session 2: Understanding gender equality and human rights in climate policy
  • Session 3: Gender and climate change – sectoral experiences
  • Session 4: Moving forward – where to from here?

Each session consisted of keynote presentations delivered by experts, with three of them having moderated and interactive group exercises to promote experience-sharing among attendees. The “Experience-sharing: the status of gender equality in climate action in Asia-Pacific” and “Designing gender responsive sectoral activities” group activities in sessions 2 and 3, respectively, allowed participants to exchange and brainstorm with peers, thus allowing them to share their experiences while they worked on tailored exercises focused on each country or sector. The former had participants split into 5 groups representing one of each focus countries while the latter had them divided into 3 groups representing three key sectors: energy, agriculture, and forestry.

“Thank you for all the organizers of the e-workshop on Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy. I have learned a lot.  It is interesting to meet so many people from all over the region that are working on the issue. I am thankful that I found this workshop and joined this network exactly at the same time as I planned to delve more into this issue.“ – E-Workshop  Participant

To attend the e-workshop, participants had to undertake a selection process which consisted of being invited or appointed by their governments or agencies and filling in an online application form. They were also encouraged to take the online course prior to the training to arrive at it with a similar level of knowledge and understanding.

The entire process was captured by a visual artist who drew live the topics and ideas discussed.

Visual Representation of Day 1

Visual Representation of Day 2

 

Disclaimer

Cover picture credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Panos Pictures  

Climate change is increasingly affecting peace and security across the globe, and factors, such as gender and social inequalities, are catalysing the effects of this dire trend. How can one help prevent climate change from further disrupting peace and security? The answer is unveiled in this new e-course, for which users can register and learn from all three modules.

Read on and find out more about “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens”.

Climate change has been called “the defining issue of our time.” We know that global temperatures are increasing – melting glaciers, raising sea levels, and causing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. But how are these changes impacting peace and security? And how do social factors, such as gender and other inequalities, also affect this nexus?

That’s what the online course on “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens” aims to unravel. This e-course has been jointly developed by UN CC:Learn, UNEPUN WomenUNDPPAUNDP and Adelphi, and presents a new and engaging opportunity to explore and unpack these complex interactions.

This free and interactive learning experience, comprising a dynamic interface with videos, infographics, quizzes and more, provides the knowledge and tools needed to analyse and identify opportunities for promoting inclusive climate, conflict prevention and peacebuilding interventions. It is divided into three modules, with a progressively in-depth focus:

  • M1: Climate Change, Peace and Security
  • M2: Conducting Integrated Analysis
  • M3: Entry Points for Policymaking and Programme Design

This course is primarily designed to empower policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. However, anyone that has a background or is interested in these topics can also benefit from it.

Overall, the course will take around 4,5h to be completed, enabling participants to:

  • Identify climate-related security risks and their impacts on different groups of people
  • Conduct integrated conflict and climate analysis, including by using a gender and social inclusion lens
  • Design policies, strategies, and programmatic interventions that integrate climate change, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and gender equality objectives

Users completing each module will receive a badge, while participants successfully finalizing the entire course will be awarded a UN certificate.

Take the course here.

Over 500,000 people have invested their time to learn more about climate change and green economy.

On 31 January 2022, UN CC:Learn reached the important milestone of 500,000 registrations on its e-learning platform. This achievement came against the backdrop of increased debate about and awareness of climate change worldwide, which consolidates the importance of UN CC:Learn in promoting climate change education and the role it plays in providing up-to-date and accessible online courses on climate change and green economy.

Over the past years, the programme has diversified its portfolio and started to offer a variety of different courses on climate change and green economy, such as the “Climate Change, Peace and Security”, the new “Introduction to Sustainable Finance” and the latest “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-courses, unraveling complex topics and delivering informative, interactive and pertinent e-learning resources that cater to different audiences, spanning technical experts, policymakers, academia, and the general public. The relevance and diversity of the content proposed, which builds on the most up-to-date knowledge of the United Nations, combined with an engaging user experience, are key to the success of the e-courses offered by UN CC:Learn. This is reflected by the high conversion rate of the platform: almost one person out of three ends up completing a course and getting a certificate.

Multilingualism, tailoring and accessibility are cornerstones of UN CC:Learn work. The e-learning platform follows the Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (Level AA) and is currently available in 6 languages. Users who register to it have an array of different courses to choose from, many of which being offered in two or more languages. Currently, there are 16 languages represented in the platform and this enhances the users’ experience by allowing them to complete the courses in their native language. The “Mastering NAPs: from Start to Finish”, for instance, can be done in English and French. The flagship “Climate Change: From Learning to Action” e-course, is currently available in English, Spanish, French and Russian, with a translation into Chinese under way. In addition,  it offers region-specific content, for instance through the “Sustainable Consumption and Production in Africa” course, which can be accessed in English and French.

Moving forward, UN CC:Learn will keep increasing and improving its course catalogue while exploring other ways of promoting climate literacy and making its e-learning platform even more accessible. On top of the courses already in the making and forecast to be launched later this year, the programme is also planning to tap on “micro-learning”, a totally new way of putting together content and experiences. Stay tuned!

Doddy S. Sukadri, a UN CC: Learn Ambassador and Executive Director of the Green Partner Foundation, analyses what actions Indonesia can take to comply with the Breakthrough Agenda resulting from COP26.

COP-26 reaffirmed the need to keep the earth’s temperature increase not exceeding 1.50 Celsius compared to the average earth temperature before the 18th-century industrial revolution. According to the official report of the Inter-Governmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), sooner or later more severe climate disasters will occur in various parts of the world if we cannot stop the increase in the earth’s temperature above 1.50 C. To keep the 1.5°C targets, half of the global emissions must be cut to achieve net-zero emissions by the middle of this century (2050). The key to achieving this target is the Breakthrough Agenda, initiated by the UK and shared by 42 world leaders, which collectively represent 70% of global GDP.

The Breakthrough Agenda called The Glasgow Breakthrough is an unprecedented global clean technology plan to help keep 1.5°C within reach of all parties. The main key is the successful implementation of technology transfer from developed countries to developing countries.

Technology Transfer

The development of technology transfer to support national action on climate change has been an important element since the beginning of the process of establishing the United Nations Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in 1992. The 26-article of the Convention deserves to be viewed as ‘law’, which must be followed and become a stepping stone in any global climate change negotiations.

Articles 4 paragraphs 1 and 5 of the UNFCCC state that all Parties must introduce and promote and cooperate in the development and transfer of GHG emission reduction technologies. It further states that the Convention urges developed countries to take all practical steps to promote, facilitate and finance the transfer of, or access to, climate technology to other Parties, in particular to developing countries. Furthermore, the Convention states that the effectiveness of technology transfer will depend largely on the commitment of developed countries in terms of funding for technology transfer.

The Glasgow Breakthrough

COP-26 has resulted in the so-called “Glasgow Breakthroughs”, which are a series of agreements between developed and developing countries to rapidly scale up clean technologies in five sectors that collectively account for more than 50% of global emissions:

  • The first is called “Power”. What is meant here are alternative energy resources that are clean and become the most affordable option and become the mainstay for all countries to meet the world’s energy needs efficiently by 2030;
  • The second is “Land Transportation”. Zero-emission vehicles are a thing that will become a necessity in the future. Such vehicles must be accessible, affordable, and sustainable in all countries by 2030;
  • The third is “Steel”. The zero-emissions or near-zero-emissions steel industry is a more desirable option in the global market through the use of more efficient steel products in every country by 2030;
  • The fourth is “Hydrogen”. Hydrogen gas is meant to be renewable, affordable, and low carbon. It is hoped that this kind of hydrogen gas will be available globally by 2030;
  • The fifth is “Agriculture”. Smart, climate-resilient and sustainable agricultural practices are the most attractive option and are widely adopted by farmers everywhere by 2030.

However, the Glasgow Breakthrough requires investment in technology and innovation. The Parties expect to establish stronger cooperation between the government and business players through various national and international initiatives to spur the process of technology transfer and innovation as well as improve the green industry. This includes, for example, stimulating green investment through policy incentives and strong signals to industry about the future economy, aligning policies and standards, enhancing R&D efforts, coordinating public investment, and mobilizing non-state budget finance, particularly in developing countries.

What we can do?

From a climate change point of view, Indonesia, with its vast area and strategic location, is considered very important in efforts to mitigate and adapt to global climate change. With a wealth of natural resources in the form of forests, energy and minerals, sea, peat, and mangroves, Indonesia’s potential for carbon sequestration and storage is extraordinary. Indonesia’s contribution is highly expected to participate in solving global climate change solutions, especially in pursuing the Paris Agreement targets. However, this hope will only be realized with a strong commitment, funding support, and adequate human resources. The role of developed countries to implement efficient, cheap, and sustainable technology transfer as framed in Article 4 of the UNFCCC is very necessary to implement this Breakthrough Agenda.

The year 2030 is just in the corner, and the homework from Glasgow needs to be done quickly. The Indonesia National Determined Contribution (NDC) needs to be reviewed, not only to increase the ambition of greenhouse gas emission reduction but also to synchronize it with Glasgow’s five breakthrough agendas. Simultaneously, the agenda needs to be integrated and synchronized with development plans that are already on the table/in progress at the national, provincial, and district/city levels.

Because this Glasgow breakthrough emphasizes technological collaboration between the government and business people, a strategic road map is needed until 2030 and beyond. At least a high level of commitment is required in the short, medium, and long-term national development plans by taking into account social, political, and economic aspects. Infrastructure support, human and financial resources are definitely needed, but again two important things are required as preconditions to realize this hope, namely leadership, and good governance. 

**
This article reflects the personal view of Mr Doddy Sukadri, UN CC:Learn Ambassador and Executive Director of Yayasan Mitra Hijau (Green Partner Foundation).

How are gender equality and human rights interlinked with climate change and renewable energy?

 

The new “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-course aims to answer this question while unpacking these critical issues in a 6-hour learning experience.

 

Read on to find out more about it.

 

Climate change effects are far-reaching and concern every aspect of society, from economic development to the realization of human rights. By multiplying existing threats, climate change disproportionally affects vulnerable groups – such as women, youth, the elderly, and persons with disabilities, reduce their ability to adapt and respond to its challenges, and enhances inequalities. 

In this context, UN CC:Learn has partnered up with EmPower, an initiative led by UN Environment and UN Women with support from the Swedish International Development Cooperation Agency (SIDA), to develop the “Gender Equality and Human Rights in Climate Action and Renewable Energy” e-course. This new free, self-paced e-course aims to equip decision-makers with the tools and knowledge to integrate gender and human rights into climate policies and commitments while explaining how to develop inclusive climate mitigation and adaptation actions, with a particular focus on the renewable energy sector.

At the end of the course, participants will be able to: 

  • Describe the nexus between gender equality, human rights, renewable energy, and climate change
  • Explain how a gender-responsive and human rights-based approach in climate action leads to economic, social, and environmental benefits
  • Recognize international and sectoral commitments on gender equality, human rights, and climate change and their relationship with national priorities and policies
  • Identify entry points for gender and human rights in renewable energy and climate policy and action
  • Select and apply tools and approaches for the promotion of human rights-based and gender-responsive climate action
  • Discuss targeted opportunities for women in climate change and renewable energy, with a particular focus on multi-stakeholder collaboration, renewable energy entrepreneurship, and access to finance.

The course consists of an introductory module and two specialized ones. The former introduces the interconnections between gender equality and human rights in climate action and renewable energy. Module 2 focuses on how to develop and implement gender-responsive renewable energy policies and programmes, with the goal of creating more opportunities for women to access and benefits from renewable energy. It pays particular attention to the promotion on women’s renewable energy entrepreneurship. Module 3 delves into how to develop and implement gender-responsive and human rights-inclusive climate change policies and frameworks at national level, including in Nationally Determined Contributions (NDCs) and National Adaptation Plans (NAPs).

Learners are invited to complete the first introductory module and then choose one of the two specialized modules according to the selected pathway. Pathway 1 is particularly intended for renewable energy experts and professionals of financial institutions. Pathway 2 is designed specifically for climate change and green economy policymakers. Participants can also opt to take all three modules. 

Each module has four lessons, a final quiz and takes an estimated 2 hours to be completed. To succeed, participants must score 70% or higher within three attempts for each final quiz. Upon successful completion of each, participants will receive a badge. After completing the quizzes for the chosen pathway, participants will be able to download their certificate from the “Certification” section of the course’s webpage.

Take the course here.

Disclaimer

Cover picture credit: Abbie Trayler-Smith/Panos Pictures

This self-paced e-course provides an overview of the interlinkages between gender, human rights, climate change, and renewable energy. It provides participants with the specific knowledge and tools to integrate and implement gender equality in renewable energy access and entrepreneurship, as well as related gender-responsive and human rights-based approaches in climate change mitigation and adaptation measures.

Enroll
  • Gender
  • Energy
  • Climate Change
  • Education

Self-paced course

6 hours

Welcome!

The deep-rooted and far-reaching impacts of climate change make it one of the most defining challenges in the world today. The impacts of climate change manifest in primary effects such as increased frequency and magnitude of extreme weather events like droughts, storms and floods. However, it is the negative secondary effects that often go overlooked, especially for those who already experience inequalities, including women, youth, the elderly, persons with disabilities and minority groups. 

Multiple and intersecting social inequalities affect the ability of marginalized groups to adapt to a changing climate, excluding these groups from decision-making processes at household, community, and national levels. They also prevent them from taking hold of the opportunities that low-emissions, climate-resilient development brings towards improved livelihoods, particularly in sectors like renewable energy that also have the potential to improve the socio-economic wellbeing of women.

This self-paced e-course provides an overview of the interlinkages between gender, human rights, climate change, and renewable energy. It provides participants with the specific knowledge and tools to integrate and implement gender equality in renewable energy access and entrepreneurship, as well as related gender-responsive and human rights-based approaches in climate change mitigation and adaptation measures. 

What Will You Learn?

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Describe the nexus between gender equality, human rights, renewable energy, and climate change
  • Explain how a gender-responsive and human rights-based approach in climate action leads to economic, social, and environmental benefits
  • Recognize international and sectoral commitments on gender equality, human rights, and climate change and their relationship with national priorities and policies
  • Identify entry points for gender and human rights in renewable energy and climate policy and action
  • Select and apply tools and approaches for the promotion of human rights-based and gender-responsive climate action
  • Discuss targeted opportunities for women in climate change and renewable energy, with a particular focus on multi-stakeholder collaboration, renewable energy entrepreneurship, and access to finance.

The Course at a Glance

 

The course includes 3 modules. These have specific learning objectives and contain a broad range of features such as videos, case studies and exercises. Each module is divided into 4 lessons of around 30 minutes each. 

 

The course provides learners with the option to choose and combine different thematic modules. There are two main learning pathways available that participants can select based on their interests. Pathway 1 is particularly intended for renewable energy experts and professionals of financial institutions. Pathway 2 is designed specifically for climate change and green economy policymakers. Both learning pathways have a common introductory module. Participants can also opt to take all three modules.

Who Should Take This Course?

The course is of particular interest to the following audiences:

  1. National policymakers, government officials and stakeholders in sectors of climate change, gender equality and renewable energy, as well as regional actors;
  2. Renewable energy service providers and officials of financial institutions in renewable energy entrepreneurship;
  3. Anyone interested in learning more about gender equality and human rights-based approaches in the renewable energy sector.

Get a Certificate

Level 1: Each module in the course has a final quiz to assess participants’ understanding of the content. Participants will receive a completion badge via email upon successful completion of each quiz. 

Level 2: Participants who pass all the final quizzes within their learning pathway will receive a UN certificate of completion, where successful completion will require a score of 70% or higher with a maximum of 3 attempts at each quiz. Upon successful completion of the quizzes, participants will be able to download their certificate – or their 2 certificates if they followed all three modules – from the “Certification” section of the course’s webpage.

This course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process. Hence, it has been formulated as a companion to the Guidelines, and we suggest it should be taken as such. 

Enroll
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

3 hours

Background

Considering ecosystem approaches as part of national development planning has always been challenging for many countries around the world. The role ecosystems play in strengthening resilience and broadening livelihood opportunities and economies in the face of climate change has not been sufficiently included in national development agendas. Not until now. With the Paris Agreement, recognizing “the protection of the integrity of ecosystems and biodiversity for both climate change mitigation and adaptation actions” , nature-based solutions (NbS), including ecosystem-based adaptation, for adapting to current and future climate change has come to the fore and countries are eager to find solutions to climate risk that can deliver multiple benefits (social, economic and environmental). Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA), which encompasses the wise use of ecosystem services to help people adapt to climate change, delivers a wide range of benefits that boost overall development and human wellbeing and may contribute to national strategies to respond to the triple crises of biodiversity loss, climate change and the global post-pandemic scenario.

The Guidelines for Integrating EbA into National Adaptation Plans (NAPs) -or EbA guidelines – have been produced as a part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support Programme  (NAP-GSP), implemented jointly by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the United Nations Environment  Programme  (UNEP) and funded by the Global Environment Facility (GEF). In 2013, the Least Developed Countries Expert Group (LEG) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) invited international actors to draft supplementary sector guidelines to the NAP Technical Guidelines they formulated in 2012, and a number of supplementary guidelines have been published since, including the EbA Guidelines. 

Through its three modules, this course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process. Hence, it has been formulated as a companion to the Guidelines, and we suggest it should be taken as such. 

This self-paced course is a learning initiative of the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR) and part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support  Programme (NAP-GSP) in partnership with Friends of the EbA (FEBA) of IUCN.  

What you will learn?

After completing the course, participants will be able to: 

  1. Explain the importance of restoring/protecting nature and implementing nature-based solutions, such as EbA, for climate change adaptation and sustainable development.
  2. Discuss how integrating EbA into NAPs enables countries to comply with their international environmental commitments such as the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), the Sendai Framework, the UNFCCC, the United Nations Convention to Combat Desertification (UNCCD) and the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD).
  3. Describe how EbA works, including the challenges, opportunities and additional benefits beyond adaptation of securing healthy ecosystems.
  4. Outline how to look for funding opportunities, and how to formulate, implement and mainstream EbA options.
  5. Explain and integrate EbA in the formulation, implementation and review stages of the NAP process.

Course at a Glance

The course is structured around three modules: 

  1. Ecosystem-based Adaptation for climate-resilient development
  2. Steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process
  3. Challenges and advantages of mainstreaming EbA

Who should take this course?

The course will provide clear, concise and current information for anyone interested in understanding the process of integrating Ecosystem-based Adaptation (EbA) into National Adaptation Plans. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  • Technical specialists, policymakers and government officials involved in the national adaptation planning process want to increase their understanding of the steps involved in integrating EbA into NAPs.
  • Technical experts in climate-sensitive sectors with an interest in better understanding how EbA can be integrated into such sectors.
  • Policymakers and technical specialists with an interest in understanding climate adaptation finance and EbA.
  • Academic and wider public stakeholders with an interest in better understanding EbA and how it can be integrated into adaptation planning.

Methodology and Certification

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It has been divided into three modules and includes an intent to use survey.  We recommend that participants take the intent to use survey before starting the course and follow the modules sequentially for the best learning experience. 

Each module contains interactive content and a non-summative assessment to check your understanding.  Each module takes around one hour to complete. The modules also contain a wealth of links to other resources on issues discussed, but these are meant for extra reading if of interest. This extra reading will not be part of the final quiz at the end of each module.  

Each module has a final quiz that aims to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. The assessment contains 10 multiple-choice questions. After passing each module’s final assessment with at least 70% within three attempts, the participant is automatically awarded a badge per module. After obtaining all three badges, the participant can download a UN Certificate of Completion from the ‘Certification’ tab.  

The Building Climate Resilience through Ecosystem-based Adaptation Planning e-course is now available!

Read on to find out how nature-based solutions and ecosystem-based adaptation can be leveraged to deliver climate change adaptation.

Climate change adaptation has been brought to the fore at COP26 as developed countries pledged billions of dollars to help developing nations and the Least Developed Countries (LDCs) adapt to climate change. During the negotiations, nature-based solutions (NbS) were often heard as a key factor to be considered when developing adaptation strategies. In this context, ecosystem-based adaptation (EbA), which refers to the use of NbS for adapting to climate change, can be a valuable instrument to deliver a wide range of benefits that boost overall development and human wellbeing, and contribute to national adaptation strategies that respond to the triple crises of biodiversity loss, climate change and the global post-pandemic recovery.

To highlight the importance of EbA in the National Adaptation Planning (NAP) process, UNITAR and UNEP have partnered up to develop the Building Climate Resilience through Ecosystem-based Adaptation Planning e-course as part of the National Adaptation Plan – Global Support Programme (NAP-GSP), a joint initiative by UNEP and UNDP.

This new free and self-paced e-learning resource builds on information from the Guidelines for Integrating Ecosystem-based Adaptation into National Adaptation Plans, a publication jointly developed by UNEP, UNDP and IUCN’s Friends of EbA (FEBA), with the purpose of helping adaptation practitioners at national and local levels to factor ecosystem functions and services into a country’s National Adaptation Plan processes and instruments. Through its three interactive modules, comprising videos, texts, quizzes and assessments, this e-course will highlight the key concepts, tools, examples, and steps for integrating EbA in the NAP process.

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  1. Explain the importance of NbS for climate change adaptation and sustainable development
  2. Discuss how integrating EbA into NAPs enables countries to comply with international commitments (e.g., Paris Agreement, 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, Sendai Framework for Disaster Risk Reduction)
  3. Explain how EbA works, including the challenges, opportunities, and additional benefits beyond adaptation of securing healthy ecosystems
  4. Outline how to look for funding opportunities, and how to formulate, implement and mainstream EbA options
  5. Explain and integrate EbA in the formulation, implementation, and review stages of the NAP process

Upon completing the course, participants will receive an official UN Certificate of Completion.

Take the course here today.