This online course unpacks the interlinkages between climate change, peace and security and explores opportunities for promoting inclusive climate action, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. Recognizing that challenges associated with climate change and insecurity do not impact everyone equally, the course includes a special focus on assessing the ways gender norms and other factors of social identity shape how people from different backgrounds experience and respond to these emerging risks.  

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Gender
  • Education

Self-paced course

4.5 hours

Welcome!

Climate change is considered by many as among the greatest risks for peace and security in the 21st century. As the planet’s temperature rises, extended droughts, rising sea levels, and more frequent and intense storms are affecting the lives and livelihoods of people in all corners of the globe. Particularly in conflict-affected settings, these impacts can compound economic, social or political drivers of insecurity, leaving already vulnerable populations on the frontlines of multiple, intersecting crises.

This self-paced, online course unpacks the interlinkages between climate change, peace and security and explores opportunities for promoting inclusive climate action, conflict prevention and peacebuilding. Recognizing that challenges associated with climate change and insecurity do not impact everyone equally, the course includes a special focus on assessing the ways gender norms and other factors of social identity shape how people from different backgrounds experience and respond to these emerging risks.  

Upon completion, course participants will be equipped with the knowledge and tools to analyze different contexts affected by climate change and insecurity, and design interventions to prevent and manage associated risks.

This course is designed to benefit a broad range of policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. The more advanced modules are particularly relevant for political analysts and peacebuilding practitioners, climate adaptation specialists, and gender and inclusion advisors.

Course structure

The course includes 3 self-standing modules:

  • Module 1: Climate Change, Peace and Security
  • Module 2: Conducting Integrated Analysis
  • Module 3: Entry Points for Policymaking and Programme Design

What will you learn?

  • To identify climate-related security risks and their impacts on different groups of people
  • To conduct integrated conflict and climate analysis, including by using a gender and social inclusion lens
  • To design policies, strategies, and programmatic interventions that integrate climate change, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and gender equality objectives

Who is this course for?

Everyone is invited to take the course, which is designed to benefit a broad range of policymakers, practitioners and researchers. The more advanced modules are particularly relevant for:

 

  • Political analysts and peacebuilding practitioners
  • Climate adaptation specialists
  • Gender and inclusion advisors

 

Will you get a certificate?

The course features two levels of certification:

 

  • Participants will receive a badge for each module they complete by passing the module’s final quiz.
  • Participants who pass all three final quizzes will be issued a certificate of completion.

 

A quiz is successfully passed at a score of 70% or higher. Completion certificates will be available for download from the course’s webpage.

This course Mastering National Adaptation Plans: from Start to Finish course will introduce learners to several important aspects of the NAP process.  It is aimed at enhancing knowledge of the NAP process elements,  relevant issues such as gender and climate information in NAP Formulation and Implementation; and financing NAP processes.   This interactive self-paced course will guide learners through various aspects of the NAP journey.

Enroll
  • Adaptation
  • Climate Change
  • Education

Self-paced course

3 hours

Welcome!

The adverse impacts of climate change are becoming increasingly more acute, particularly for developing countries. This further exacerbates the wellbeing of the poorest and most vulnerable, meaning adaptation is now crucial to their survival and protection. Successful national adaptation planning requires detailed knowledge and practical skills in order to effectively and efficiently tackle current and future threats. 

The National Adaptation Plan (NAPs) process was established under the Cancun Adaptation Framework (2010) in order to prepare countries for addressing climate risk in the medium term. The main objectives of the NAPs are to reduce vulnerability to climate change, and to mainstream climate change adaptation in all levels of planning.  NAPs require building a stronger evidence base, improving skills and capacity.  Additionally need to be country-driven, gender-sensitive, participatory, and use transparent approaches. 

This course Mastering National Adaptation Plans: from Start to Finish course will introduce learners to several important aspects of the NAP process.  It is aimed at enhancing knowledge of the NAP process elements,  relevant issues such as gender and climate information in NAP Formulation and Implementation; and financing NAP processes.   This interactive self-paced course will guide learners through various aspects of the NAP journey.

What will you learn?

By completing the course, participants will be able to: 

  • Discuss the importance of inclusion of various stakeholders and institutions in the NAP process.
  • List some examples of important climate data and information necessary for the NAP process, as well as discuss their possible sources locally and internationally.
  • Explain how climate change adaptation planning could be integrated across different climate-sensitive socio-economic sectors.
  • Discuss common national and international sources of climate adaptation finance relevant for the NAPs.

Course at a glance

The course consists of three interlinked modules each taking an average of 1 hour to complete:   

  • Module 1: Exploring and Developing a NAP
  • Module 2: Implementing and Reviewing a NAP
  • Module 3: Financing the NAP process

Who should take this course?

The course will provide clear, concise, and up-to-date information for anybody interested in exploring the important aspects of the NAP process. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  • Policymakers and government officials from LDCs and other developing countries working on NAPs wanting to increase their understanding on the steps involved in national adaptation planning, and the challenges that may arise along the way
  • Technical experts in climate-sensitive sectors with an interest in better understanding the cross-sectoral linkages between climate change and their sectors
  • Policymakers and technical specialists with an interest in understanding climate adaptation finance
  • Academic and wider public stakeholders interested in enhancing their knowledge on the process of adaptation

Methodology

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It has been divided into three modules.  We recommend that you view the modules sequentially for the best learning experience, starting with Module 1 which focuses on the formulation and planning phases of the NAP process; Module 2 focuses on the implementation and review phases of the NAP process and ends with Module 3 which focuses on financing the NAP process.  

Each module contains interactive content and a non-summative assessment to check your understanding.  Each module takes around 1 hour to complete. The modules also contain a wealth of links to other resources on issues discussed, but these are meant for extra reading if of interest. This extra reading will not be part of the final quiz at the end of each Module.  

Each module has a final quiz that aims to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. The assessment contains 10 multiple-choice questions. After passing each module’s final assessment with at least 70% of correct answers within 3 attempts, the participant automatically unlocks a badge per module. After obtaining all 3 badges for each module, the participant can automatically download a UN Certificate of Completion from the Certification tab.  

Climate change is increasingly affecting peace and security across the globe, and factors, such as gender and social inequalities, are catalysing the effects of this dire trend. How can one help prevent climate change from further disrupting peace and security? The answer is unveiled in this brand new e-course, of which Module 1 is already available for enrolment.

 

Read on and find out more about “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens”.

Climate change has been called “the defining issue of our time.” We know that global temperatures are increasing – melting glaciers, raising sea levels, and causing more severe and frequent extreme weather events. But how are these changes impacting peace and security? And how do social factors, such as gender and other inequalities, also affect this nexus?

That’s what the online course on “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens” aims to unravel. This e-course has been jointly developed by UN CC:Learn, UNEP, UN Women, UNDPPA, UNDP and Adelphi, and presents a new and engaging opportunity to explore and unpack these complex interactions.

As one of the biggest challenges facing humanity in the 21st century, climate change poses serious risks to peace and security. The impacts of rising temperatures are already disrupting lives and livelihoods across the world, and forecasts predict that this situation will only worsen over time – leading, for instance, to extreme weather events, food insecurity due to lower agricultural outputs, and mass displacements of people. Meanwhile, the impacts of climate change do not affect everyone equally, with fragile contexts and vulnerable groups already being disproportionately affected.

However, by considering the interdependent and interconnected nature of these risks, it is possible to not only address these but to also discover new opportunities for conflict prevention, peacebuilding, climate adaptation, and gender equality or social inclusion – achieving even greater impact. Through an interactive, free and self-paced learning experience, “Climate Change, Peace and Security: Understanding Climate-Related Security Risks Through an Integrated Lens” provides the knowledge and tools needed to analyse and identify such opportunities, for promoting inclusive climate, conflict prevention and peacebuilding interventions in specific contexts.

The course is divided into three modules, with a progressively in-depth focus:

  • M1: Climate Change, Peace and Security
  • M2: Conducting Integrated Analysis
  • M3: Entry Points for Policymaking and Programme Design

This course is primarily designed to empower policymakers, practitioners, and researchers. However, anyone that has a background or is interested in these topics can also benefit from it.

Overall, the course will take around 4,5h to be completed, enabling participants to:

  • Identify climate-related security risks and their impacts on different groups of people
  • Conduct integrated conflict and climate analysis, including by using a gender and social inclusion lens
  • Design policies, strategies, and programmatic interventions that integrate climate change, conflict prevention, peacebuilding, and gender equality objectives

Users completing each module will receive a badge, while participants successfully finalizing the entire course will be awarded a UN certificate.

The first module has just been made available on UN CC:e-Learn, and the other two will be released in the coming months. “Module 1: Climate Change, Peace and Security” was designed for a broader audience and unpacks the interlinkages between these three topics, while introducing the core concepts and principles that are essential for understanding and addressing compound climate-security risks

Take Module 1 TODAY here.

Climate change and human rights have become intertwined topics. As the former keep affecting countries and communities across the world, the basic human rights of people hang in balance. This newly launched affiliated e-course helps you understand why it’s important to take human rights into account when acting on climate change. Read on to find out more!

“The climate crisis is the biggest threat to our survival as a species and is already threatening human rights around the world”. – António Guterres, UN Secretary-General, February 2020

As the world edges closer to the 1.5°C of global temperature rise, the effects of climate change are already being felt across every corner of the globe and this situation will only worsen throughout the 21st century. These distressing effects threaten the basic human rights of people and communities – especially the most disadvantaged – as they don’t have the resources or capabilities to withstand climate-related disasters, such as droughts, floods, and extreme heat waves. Against this backdrop, UNFCCC, OHCHR and PCBB, with support from GIZ and BMZ, have partnered up to develop the e-course “An Introduction to Climate Change and Human Rights” with the aim of shedding light on the correlation between these two topics. The e-course has been affiliated by UN CC:Learn and is available on its e-learning platform.

In order to safeguard the livelihoods of people, climate change and human rights must be addressed as two overarching topics that overlap each other. For instance, the OHCHR has predicted that climate change will push an extra 100 million people into poverty by 2030,  further widening the gap between rich and poor. The newly launched e-course walks learners through this and several other issues in 7 key modules that take an average of 3,5 hours to be completed.

In addition to displaying the interlinkages between climate change and human rights, the affiliated e-course also explains why a rights-based, participatory climate action can lead to more coherent, sustainable, and effective outcomes. Furthermore, it also confirms that increased awareness and education on both human rights and climate change are key to enhancing consequential climate action. Each course module covers specific topics and has specific learning objectives. The modules are:

  • Module 1: Human Rights Impacts of Climate Change and Corresponding Human Rights Obligations
  • Module 2: Human Rights in Climate Negotiations, Agreements and Action
  • Module 3: Climate Change in Human Rights Processes, Agreements and Action
  • Module 4: Persons, Groups and Peoples in Marginalized Situations
  • Module 5: Regional and National Frameworks and Action
  • Module 6: Rights-Based Climate Litigation
  • Module 7: Right to Development and Climate Change in Focus

“An Introduction to Climate Change and Human Rights” caters to a diverse audience. From experts and policymakers to students and enthusiasts, everyone is welcome to take up the course to better understand, participate, and act on climate change as well as human rights challenges and opportunities.

The UN CC:Learn affiliation programme highlights high-quality e-learning products on climate change developed by recognized institutions outside the framework of the UN CC:Learn programme / without support from the UN CC:Learn Secretariat, in accordance with specific affiliation criteria. The objective of the UN CC:Learn affiliation programme is to enhance global climate literacy through dissemination of high-level learning products that complement UN CC:Learn resources.

Start learning today here.

UN CC:Learn has partnered up with WHO, UNITAR and Climate Tracker to come up with a course that unpacks the interlinkages between climate change and health. In the lead-up to COP26 and amid a global pandemic, approaching these topics together has never been so important. Read on to find out more!

Human-driven climate change is expected to cause 250,000 additional deaths per year from 2030 to 2050, as well as billions of extra costs to countries throughout the globe. Also, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the important interlinkages between human health and the state of our environment and economies. As societies expand and develop, addressing human health and climate change as two intertwined topics has never been so important.

In light of these challenge and aiming at supporting delegates participating in the upcoming UN climate change negotiations (COP26), UN CC:Learn, the United Nations Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR), the World Health Organization (WHO) and Climate Tracker have developed a brand new e-course on Climate Change Negotiations and Health.

The newly launched e-course is entirely self-paced, has 6 lessons and takes an average of 3 hours to be completed. It unveils the interlinkages between climate change and health and sheds light on how international treaties on climate change address health issue. Additionally, the course is supported by two webinars on negotiation skills (webinar 1and webinar 2). Upon completion of the course, users will be able to:

  • Explain how climate change affects health.
  • Recognize the international climate change policy framework.
  • Identify the Parties and groups of Parties to the UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, including their respective commitments and negotiation positions.
  • Describe the outcomes of past negotiation sessions.
  • Discuss the key issues in the ongoing international climate change negotiations, particularly in relation to the promotion of health priorities and the integration of health in all policies.

The course is open to anybody interested. However, it should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

  1. Health sector professionals participating in international climate change negotiations and in national climate change-related processes;
  2. Environmental sector professionals participating in international and national climate change processes as well as climate change negotiators;
  3. Other interested government officials and practitioners;
  4. Academics and university students;
  5. Other individuals interested in learning about the promotion of health priorities in the context of climate change and climate change negotiations.

Upon satisfactory completion of the course, which means scoring 70% or more in the final quiz within 3 attempts, users will get an official UN CC:Learn certificate.

Take the course here.

Image Credits: Frerieke - Flickr I 30.06.2009 - Original: https://bit.ly/3vhmFdI
As a child growing up in Namibia in the late 80s and early 90s, my earliest memory always has the sound of the radio in the background. That would be whether I was at home in town or while helping out in the fields while visiting the village. I vividly remember listening to Christmas carols or the liberation songs to commemorate the Namibian liberation struggle against apartheid on Independence / Heroes days. Radio has been a big part of my childhood, it was a source of information and entertainment.”

“….Through this mode of communication, we learned of far-off relatives either hospitalized or passed on before the diffusion of mobile phones. If there was one thing that was a constant in many households, from the well-off to the poor, it was a basic FM/AM radio. It was affordable and required minimal maintenance and their batteries lasted for weeks if not months. That was the reality for many in the Southern African region, and most probably the rest of the African continent.”  – Josefina Ashipala, UN CC:Learn

In Southern Africa, radio continues to be the primary means of mass-communication and a source of information and entertainment especially to young people and their families. It can reach both the well-off and the poor, young and old, educated and illiterate. This mode of communication provides programmes for all audiences, from listening to folktales or stories for kids to discussing relevant pressing societal issues. It also provides a platform for Early Warning Systems such as tracking the whereabout of the swarms of desert locusts that were devastating crops in the region in early 2021.  More than a tool to share information, radio continues to be a key site for community-building and foster positive change.

Image Credits: Joe Haupt – Flickr I 08.04.2021 – Original: https://bit.ly/2SiPdq3

The ongoing COVID-19 pandemic has made the importance of radio in sub-Saharan Africa particularly clear. In a context where access to the internet is limited, closing schools also meant that the education of many was put on hold. Radio changed that as it allowed students from all backgrounds to keep up with their studies.

In this spirit, a climate change radio programme “Our Changing Climate – Our Time to Act!” was created by the MIET Africa, UN CC:Learn Partnership and relevant environment Ministries as part of the COVID-19 emergency response in Malawi, Zambia and Zimbabwe. Between November 2020 and February 2021, 108 episodes were broadcast with an estimated reach of more than 27 million listeners from all ages across the three countries.

The 30-minute radio episodes fostered discussions around key climate change issues; practical ways of mitigating the impacts at country, community, family and individual levels; and calls to action for communities, families and individuals to do their part as friends of the earth. Listeners were also encouraged to join the discussions and take climate actions through weekly competitions. The winners won prizes that included solar-powered radios. A winner from Zambia said that the programme was very useful as it increased knowledge on climate change issues. For a teacher in Malawi, the content covered on the programme proved to boost his interest in environmental conservation and a way to supplement gaps in the syllabus of the current course curricula

Additionally, a two-episode programme (episode 1 and episode 2) for TV was developed and broadcast in different languages in the countries with an estimated reach of over 5 million viewers across the 3 countries.  Radio programme hosts opined that the programme was timely and that the experts had articulated the issues well, making the programme accessible and exciting while increasing listeners’ interest and engagement.  This new approach in mainstreaming climate change through radio programme is an effective way of providing information that can increase knowledge and change attitudes and behaviors of citizens. It particularly offers opportunities where internet connection is not stable and when countries started putting COVID-19 containment measures in place such as closure of schools and many key programs such as climate change education became very limited.

Image Credits: Jos Verhoogen – Flickr I 02.09.2004 – Original: https://bit.ly/3vfEREL

The course aims to support delegates attending the 26th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and participating in climate diplomacy. It also provides valuable insights for the professionals involved in the development and implementation of national climate change and health policies. 

Enroll
  • Health
  • Climate Change

Self-paced course

3 hours

Welcome

It is increasingly evident that environmental challenges have an impact on human health, reinforcing existing risks. For instance, it is estimated that climate change will cause around 250,000 additional deaths per year between 2030 and 2050 – linked to issues ranging from malnutrition to heat stress, with direct costs to health expected to be between USD 2-4 billion/year by 20301. Also, the current COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted the important interlinkages between human health and the state of our environment and economies.

With the recognition that the equilibrium between people and planet is one of the fundamental issues of our time, this online course delves into the interlinkages between climate change and health, with particular reference to the international climate change policy process and the need for a healthy a green recovery from COVID-19.

Specifically, the course aims to support delegates attending the 26th session of the Conference of the Parties (COP) to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and participating in climate diplomacy. It also provides valuable insights for the professionals involved in the development and implementation of national climate change and health policies. 

What you will learn?

The ultimate objective of the course is to support participants in addressing health within climate change negotiations and national policy processes, as well as in considering climate change in health policies.

After completing the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain how climate change affects health;
  • Recognize the international climate change policy framework;
  • Identify the Parties and groups of Parties to the UNFCCC, the Kyoto Protocol, and the Paris Agreement, including their respective commitments and negotiation positions;
  • Describe the outcomes of past negotiation sessions;
  • Discuss the key issues in the ongoing international climate change negotiations, particularly in relation to the promotion of health priorities and the integration of health in all policies.

Course at a Glance

The course features key information on climate change and its impacts on human health, provides an overview of the climate change negotiations so far, and considers entry points to address health issues and priorities within climate change negotiations and policies. It is divided into six lessons:

Lesson 1: Introduction to Health and Climate Change
Lesson 2: History of the UN Climate Negotiations
Lesson 3: The Paris Agreement
Lesson 4: From Paris to Glasgow
Lesson 5: Health in the UN Climate Change Negotiations
Lesson 6: Healthy and Green Recovery from COVID-19

Who is this course for?

The course provides clear, concise, and up-to-date information for anybody interested in addressing the health risks arising from climate change. It should be of particular interest to the following audiences:

1) Health sector professionals participating in international climate change negotiations and in national climate change-related processes;
2) Environmental sector professionals participating in international and national climate change processes as well as climate change negotiators;
3) Other interested government officials and practitioners;
4) Academics and university students;
5) Other individuals interested in learning about the promotion of health priorities in the context of climate change and climate change negotiations.

Methodology

The course is self-paced and not moderated. It is adapted to the schedule of professionals in full-time work. Participants are provided with the opportunity to learn through various experiences: absorb (read); interact (activity); and reflect (relate to one’s own reality).

The course includes a series of self-standing interactive lessons with different activities, exercises, case studies, and videos. It also contains a wealth of links to other resources on health and climate change and is thus a gateway to more in-depth and specific information.

A quiz at the end of the course allows participants to assess the achievement of the learning objectives. A quiz is successfully passed at a score of 70% or higher, within three attempts. Once the certification criteria have been met, learners can download a certificate of completion from the “Certification” section of the course webpage.

After the completion, participants have the possibility to submit a feedback form accessible on the course webpage.

This course addresses how human rights obligations require the international community to take more ambitious action to mitigate emissions, to support adaptation that benefits persons, groups and peoples in vulnerable situations, and to address loss and damage associated with the impacts of climate change.

Enroll
  • Climate Change
  • Youth
  • Education

Self-paced course

3.5 hours

Welcome

From hurricanes affecting communities in the Caribbean, to sea level rise threatening lives and livelihoods across the Pacific, heat waves and droughts across Europe, and people displaced in the context of extreme weather events, floods and droughts, the effects of climate change are already impacting human rights, including, the rights to food, water and sanitation, decent shelter, health, personal security, and even life itself. Climate change disproportionately affects the world’s most disadvantaged people – those who are the poorest, most exposed and have the least resources to withstand climate shocks and stresses such as extreme weather events. Climate action that is not anchored in a human rights-based approach risks further violating human rights.

This course addresses how human rights obligations require the international community to take more ambitious action to mitigate emissions, to support adaptation that benefits persons, groups and peoples in vulnerable situations, and to address loss and damage associated with the impacts of climate change. It demonstrates the importance of rights-based, participatory climate action, which leads to more coherent, sustainable and effective outcomes. Increased awareness and education on human rights and climate change have been identified as key variables to enhance and support effective, rights-based climate action.

Course at a glance

This course is self-paced and consists in seven modules packaged in one interactive material. The seven modules are:

  • MODULE 1: Human rights impacts of climate change and corresponding human rights obligations: consists of an introduction to human rights and climate change, an overview of the human right impacts of climate change, and the corresponding human rights obligations.
  • MODULE 2: Human rights in climate negotiations, agreements and action: introduces you to the incorporation of human rights in global climate change negotiations, agreements and action.
  • MODULE 3: Climate change in human rights processes, agreements and action: introduces you to the incorporation of climate change in human rights processes, agreements and action.
  • MODULE 4: Persons, groups and peoples in vulnerable situations: provides an introduction to the disproportionate impacts of climate change on persons, groups and peoples in vulnerable situations, and highlights considerations made in international and national processes to address these impacts.
  • MODULE 5: Regional and national frameworks and action: provides an introductory overview to key regional human rights frameworks and mechanisms.
  • MODULE 6: Rights-based climate litigation: highlights efforts by rights-holders to hold duty bearers accountable for climate change and the protection of human rights through examples of climate change litigation.
  • MODULE 7: Right to development and climate change in focus: a case study on the linkages between climate change and the right to development.

Completion requirements

This course is certified providing a certificate of completion to those who complete the course and pass the final assessment. The final assessment consists in a quiz available at the end of the course which allows you to test your knowledge. against the learning objectives of the course. Once completed with at least 70% of correct answers, you will receive a certificate of completion. You have a maximum of three attempts. Please, access your certificate under the tap “Certification” on the main course page.

While each of the seven modules is followed by a short quiz (within the interactive lesson), these are not counted against the final grade. They are part of the learning process and aim to prepare you for the final quiz.

Asha Alexander is the Principal at a Primary School in Dubai and a UN CC:Learn champion. She has been innovating the way climate change is addressed in school curricula. She has been playing a key role to leverage climate literacy among students and encouraging them and teachers to act climate. Check out her story and find out what initiatives she has been implementing at her school and how can you replicate them at yours.

My name is Asha Alexander, and I’m the Principal at The Kindergarten Starters, a Primary School with over 5,000 students in Dubai, UAE, and Executive Leader for Climate Change at GEMS Education.

Photo: Asha Alexander

Photo: Asha Alexander

As a primary school tucked away in the heart of an oil-rich emirate country, we were perhaps the most unlikely of contenders to lead the charge against climate change. However, one morning I came across a newspaper article that talked of a local schoolteacher becoming climate change certified. That roused my curiosity, and I pursued the link to the UN CC:Learn platform. A week later, I had received a UN CC:Learn certification – and possessed more knowledge than I had ever imagined possible about climate change. I knew then that the time had come to change our school and every school in the world.

Within a month the school had 327 UN certified climate change teachers, with each of its 162 classrooms now prepared to deliver climate literacy as part of the curriculum – connecting these objectives to the real-life problems that existed around us in the desert, from water conversation, to ridding the school of plastic. The children were similarly enthused and began the fall season with a pledge to plant 15,000 trees each year as part of the “Plant a Legacy” project. They travelled to the desert to plant the local Ghaf tree, and engaged with more than 40 local organizations to plant trees on their premises. These efforts caught the attention of other schools and media, with The Guardian newspaper developing a visual feature on the school’s climate literacy template.

Photo: Asha Alexander

Photo: Asha Alexander

Less than a month later, I travelled to Madrid to attend COP 25. Disappointed at the lack of attention being given towards climate literacy, we decided to create a new platform to amplify student voices – and it was here that the world’s first School Conference of Parties Expo was born. What began as a venture to amplify our own students voices has now expanded, with 50 schools from Costa Rica to Australia registering at SCOPE 2020 to participate in climate debates and discussions.

The purpose of SCOPE 2020 is to empower students with high levels of climate change awareness, deep climate change research and collaborative, global problem-solving skills. It hopes to bring faculty, students and staff together in an ongoing dialogue, inquiry and discovery of more sustainable practices through embedding climate literacy in schools. It is also a platform for young student climate activists to share their journeys, and to hopefully inspire thousands of others.

Through an opportunity to be heard, we hope that governments and policymakers will ensure that climate literacy is embedded in every school in the world, and that students will never lose sight of the urgency needed to cut emissions, restore our habitats, and secure our planet for the future. This is therefore a story without an end. Its conclusion will be shaped by the teachers that were upskilled, and the students who have forever been changed by what they have learned.

Get Involved:

Is your school addressing climate change in curricula? Tell us about how you learn about climate change at your school or university on Facebook, Instagram or Twitter and tag UN CCLearn. We are looking forward to hearing your say!

If you are a teacher and would like to learn more about climate change and gain confidence to include this topic in the classroom, access our programme dedicated to teachers here.

Start your learning journey:

Get the chance to learning about climate change free of charge at www.unccelearn.org. Our comprehensive course catalogue offers short and long courses for you to accommodate your learning hours into your schedule. After reading Asha’s story, you may be interested in checking out the following courses:

Maurici Tadeu is one of the 2020 UN CC:Learn champion. He created the Lighthouse School, which aims to teach about the negative impacts of climate change on the environment and society, and to encourage actions for a more sustainable planet. Read about Maurici’s journey and how the Lighthouse School has contributed to implementing low-carbon activities in the community.

Leia a história na integra em Português clicando aqui.

My name is Maurici Tadeu, and I am from Brazil. The environment in which I grew up did not provide me with the tools needed to understand environmental issues, especially in relation to global warming. Instead, everything I learned came from my own private interest. I remember one of the phrases of that marked me at that time: think globally; act locally. Having limited financial resources, I could only learn about the environment through free courses and activities. My friends told me about the free, online UN CC:Learn course on “Introduction to Climate Change”, and I decided to take it.

Photo: Maurici Tadeu

Photo: Maurici Tadeu

Having taking the course, and reviewed all of the information that was inside, I could see that I did not in fact know many of the causes of climate change. I realized that I had been mistaken about anthropogenic variables, and the effect that these can have – which certainly also included my own daily actions. The course therefore stimulated me to ask: what is my part in all this, as a contributor to a more sustainable planet? Now, my vision has changed. I see that the serious problem of climate change will affect various dimensions of human life, and that we need to take effective and rapid action – or risk seeing the temperature of the planet rise to levels that will generate a cascade of catastrophes.  As a result, I was encouraged to look for actions close to my community, in the hope that we could find possible alternatives together.

Slope and erosion protection | Photo: Maurici Tadeu

Slope and erosion protection | Photo: Maurici Tadeu

We have now created a small school, which we have named the “Lighthouse School”. This school is a collective; a group of people from the community that we have brought together to think about the most pressing environmental issues. We found in the word ‘Lighthouse’ a reflection of what we were hoping to achieve – that is, to follow the educational path provided by the UN CC:Learn course, as a guiding light that has helped us change our view of the world. To begin with, we took an old shed and converted it into a small school. Then using an old computer, we downloaded the course contents in PDF and PowerPoint formats, and decided to meet every Monday. We divided the material up so as not to make it too heavy, and adapted some of the modules to make them easier to grasp – presenting the theoretical and scientific basis for climate change, and trying to contextualize this within examples that are close to our own daily realities. With this, the degree of understanding increased significantly, and people were able to relate global warming to their daily lives. We are, in these classes, qualifying our local observations and encouraging community initiatives, including activities that add to other disaster risk reduction strategies and focus on low-carbon development.

Completion of the lighthouse school. Location of climate change courses. Photo: Maurici Tadeu

Completion of the lighthouse school. Location of climate change courses. Photo: Maurici Tadeu

We hope to soon be able to cooperate with local schools to integrate climate change issues into their curricula, to develop in partnership materials to support quality learning, and to provide training to their teachers – taking care to protect the educational structures of our region against future environmental impacts. Through these actions, we hope to do justice to this global call for a better planet – using simple attitudes that depend more on people’s will than on financial support. We are sure that we can effectively become a beacon, building the attitudes for adaptation and coping, and to take evidence-based preventive actions, through a simple and inexpensive pedagogical approach.

Receiving children for field days and ecological activities. Photo: Maurici Tadeu

Receiving children for field days and ecological activities. Photo: Maurici Tadeu

At the time of publication of this story, Maurici was appointed as the new Secretary of Education of his municipality and wants to integrate climate change learning into schools’ curricula, find partners to develop learning materials, and provide training for teachers.

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Start learning about climate change today through our free learning platform www.unccelearn.org. After reading Maurici’s story, you may be interested in checking out more about the following courses: