Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman has over 27 years of experience working for several different international organizations, where his focus has always been nature preservation. He took the REDD+ course which helped him tremendously in training rural Pakistani communities.

Being global citizens of the planet earth, let us join hand in hand to work individually and collectively to fight for global climate change issues. We must act today instead of thinking to do it tomorrow.” — Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman has over 27 years of experience working for several different international organizations, where his focus has always been nature preservation.

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman visited the Kangaroos Garden in Melbourne Australia to observe forest conservation and wild life protection (July 2017)./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Ikram Ur Rahman visited the Kangaroos Garden in Melbourne Australia to observe forest conservation and wild life protection (July 2017)./©Ikram Ur Rahman

He is currently serving as a Regional Project Coordinator in the Mountains and Markets Project in the Northern Province of Pakistan, funded by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) and the Global Environmental Facility (GEF). The goal of this project is to use the voluntary certification of non-timber forest products (NTFP) to promote conservation and to help create a market, which benefits existing conservation efforts.

This project provides local stakeholders, who were earning their livelihood with timber products, with the opportunity to become long-term guardians of natural resources, such as medicinal and aromatic plants (MAP).

The global trade value of MAPs is estimated at around 60 billion USD and is expected to grow to 5 trillion USD by 2050, a huge potential market for rural Pakistani communities, considering that the MAP’s value per weight is one of the highest amongst traded plants in Pakistan.

NTFPs Development Nursery for growing and transplanting high value MAP in respective habitats./©Ikram Ur Rahman

NTFPs Development Nursery for growing and transplanting high value MAP in respective habitats./©Ikram Ur Rahman

For this reason, Dr. Rahman is using his expertise in preserving wild origin organic products to support capacity building in rural Pakistani communities. He is training his community in the sustainable collection, post-collection processing, value addition, product development as well as the necessary marketing of NTFPs such as MAPs.

By informing rural communities on the natural and monetary value of resource management and sustainable land use, he is helping the local community to learn about alternative ways of increasing their economic growth, as well as creating awareness about the consequences of tree cutting and timber selling.

Maintaining high value MAP nursery in collaboration with NTFPs Directorate of Forest Department KP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Maintaining high-value MAP nursery in collaboration with NTFPs Directorate of Forest Department KP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

In 2015, Dr. Rahman was at COP21 in Paris. He learned about the Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation programme (REDD), which aims at reducing GHG emissions by introducing sustainable forest management in developing countries. Soon after, he observed many REDD related approaches dealing with the mitigation of climate change such as the conservation of existing resources and the enhancement of carbon stock through forestation and afforestation.

He integrated these new concepts into the technical training that he was delivering to the rural Pakistani communities. As he began to gain new knowledge on these topics, he started to do a UN CC:e-Learn course. Specifically, he enrolled in the REDD+ Academy e-Course, which enhanced his knowledge on setting reference levels, monitoring, and stakeholder engagement in forest preservation.

According to Dr. Rahman, these e-courses helped him tremendously in training the rural communities.

I was able to raise awareness in the approach of nature conservation” – he said.

He integrated information related to sustainable forest management and conservation issues into the presentation materials, which provided practicable information for people living in the rural Northern Pakistani areas.

By taking UN CC:e-Learn courses, I was able to grant communities, that committed to NTFP harvests, the access to national and international markets with their products” – he added.

The knowledge transmitted by the UN CC:e-Learn courses constitutes a key economic opportunity for the Northern Pakistani community considering the value of the total MAP market and demonstrates the impact that these courses might have on developing countries’ communities.

MAP collectors granted with safe collection tool kits after their training on sustainable collection of MAP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

MAP collectors granted with safe collection tool kits after their training on the sustainable collection of MAP./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Furthermore, Dr. Rahman, currently working under UNDP Pakistan, was rewarded for taking part in this course. After presenting his UN CC:e-Learn certificate to his UNDP supervisor — he was granted a raise, based on the fact that his newly acquired know-how can be used to boost economic benefits for his community by integrating newly learned approaches of nature preservation and resource management. This in turn shows that employers appreciate it when their employees seek ways for continuing learning.

Although Dr. Rahman has come a long way, he still aims to do more. He would like to take a more inclusive approach in his undertakings. This would mean involving women in sustainable resource projects. He also sees a need for educating schoolchildren and students about the importance of nature conservation in order to teach responsible conduct with the environment from an early age on. These two tasks can be supported by taking UN CC:e-Learn courses, namely the Children and Climate Change and an upcoming course on Gender Equality, Women’s Empowerment, and the Environment, both courses provide the opportunity to support Dr. Rahman and his community in their ambitions.

Surveying NTFP status to allocate sustainable harvest quota for different species and declare species for enhanced conservation./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Surveying NTFP status to allocate sustainable harvest quota for different species and declare species for enhanced conservation./©Ikram Ur Rahman

Dr. Rahman did not only gain in terms of monetary increments, but he also passed on the knowledge he acquired through UN CC:e-Learn courses to his community. In turn, people are now able to sell their products on the international market. These products provide a steady income to the poor rural communities of Northern Pakistan, and the change in resource use within the community is helping to decrease deforestation and upholding the rich biodiversity in the region.

*Dr. Rahman is currently acting as a Regional Program Coordinator in the Sustainable Land Management Project (SLMP-II) in Khyberpukhtunkhwa Province of Pakistan. The story is of 2017 when he was serving in the Mountains & Markets Project as Regional Project Coordinator. Local Communities, UNDP Pakistan, GEF, Ministry of Climate Change and provincial line departments/institutions work together as the key stakeholders in these Projects.

Developed in partnership with the REDD+ Academy, this course introduces participants to the basics of REDD+. It includes the elements required under the UNFCCC, how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level, and the financial resources available.

 

“The structure of the course gives the reader comprehensive knowledge of the forest and climate change for policymakers and environmentalists to design actions.” – Learner from India

Enroll
  • REDD+
  • Climate Change
  • Science

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

The REDD+ Academy is a coordinated REDD+ capacity development initiative led by the UN-REDD Programme and the UNEP Environmental Education and Training Unit, which seeks to match the scale of the global climate change mitigation challenge and enable systematic, focused capacity development to deliver REDD+ on the ground.

The development of the REDD+ Academy responds to needs expressed by UN-REDD Programme partner countries for a regionally focused education initiative for those involved in national REDD+ programmes.

What you will learn?

After completing the course Fundamentals on REDD+, you will be able to:

  • Explain the role of deforestation and forest degradation in the process of climate change;
  • Define REDD+ aspects in the context of the UNFCCC;
  • Explain the importance of analysing and prioritizing direct and indirect drivers of deforestation and forest degradation;
  • Explain the relationship between policies and measures (PAMs) and the five REDD+ activities;
  • Describe the process of developing a National REDD+ Strategy or Action Plan;
  • Identify the variety of perceptions of REDD+ finance in each of the three REDD+ phases.

The Course at a Glance

The course on Fundamentals on REDD+ is structured around six modules. The first three modules present a general introduction on the topic. The last three modules present various REDD+ elements which are required under the UNFCCC and how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level, including what financial resources are available.

  1. Forest, Carbon Sequestration and Climate Change;
  2. Understanding REDD+ and the UNFCCC;
  3. Drivers of Deforestation and Forest Degradation;
  4. Policies and Measures for REDD+ Implementation;
  5. National Strategies and Action Plans; 6. REDD+ Finance.

Completion Requirements

The quizzes can be completed at any time. They assess the achievement of the learning objectives for each module. Each quiz can be attempted a maximum of three times. Passing a quiz with at least 70% rewards learners with a badge associated to the specific module. Once the six quizzes are passed, and learners obtain all the six badges available, they can download a certificate of completion from the course home page.

Partners

The modules have been developed and peer-reviewed by UN-REDD and UN CC:Learn.

Developed in partnership with the REDD+ Academy, this course deals in greater detail with three REDD+ elements, including monitoring systems and safeguards. It also discusses best practices for engaging stakeholders in REDD+ processes and key principles of good governance.

 

“So much informative course and strongly relevant for practical use in the field.” – Learner from Swaziland

Enroll
  • REDD+
  • Climate Change
  • Science

Self-paced course

12 hours

Welcome

The REDD+ Academy is a coordinated REDD+ capacity development initiative led by the UN-REDD Programme and the UN Environment Environmental Education and Training Unit, which seeks to match the scale of the global climate change mitigation challenge and enable systematic, focused capacity development to deliver REDD+ on the ground.

The development of the REDD+ Academy responds to needs expressed by UN-REDD Programme partner countries for a regionally focused education initiative for those involved in national REDD+ programmes.

What you will learn?

After completing the course Advancing on REDD+, you will be able to:

  • Describe the process and objectives of developing a National Forest Monitoring System;
  • Explain the importance of developing Forest Reference [Emission] Levels (FRELs/FRLs);
  • Explain the need for Safeguard Information Systems in REDD+ implementation;
  • Describe the characteristics of an Incentive Allocation System;
  • Describe the importance of stakeholder engagement for successful REDD+ implementation;
  • Describe the underlying governance factors that can affect REDD+ implementation.

The course at a glance

The Advancing on REDD+ course is structured around six modules. While how to prepare and implement REDD+ at the national level through a National Strategy or Action Plan, including financial resources available, is discussed in the course Fundamentals on REDD+, the Advancing on REDD+ course presents the other three REDD+ elements, to which it adds the importance of engaging the relevant stakeholders in the process and the principles of good governance.

The six modules are as follows:

  1. National Forest Monitoring Systems for REDD+;
  2. Forest Reference Emission Levels (FRELs);
  3. REDD+ Safeguards under the UNFCCC;
  4. Approaches for the Allocation of Incentives;
  5. Stakeholder Engagement in REDD+; 6. Good Governance.

Completion requirements

The quizzes can be completed at any time. They assess the achievement of the learning objectives for each module. Each quiz can be attempted a maximum of three times. Passing a quiz with at least 70% rewards learners with a badge associated to the specific module. Once the six quizzes are passed, and learners obtain all the six badges available, they can download a certificate of completion from the course home page.

Partners

The modules have been developed and peer-reviewed by UN-REDD and UN CC:Learn.

Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy was featured at a COP 20 side event on “Education and Communication as Cornerstones for Effective Climate Actions” in Lima, Peru on 10 December 2014.

Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy was featured at a COP 20 side event on “Education and Communication as Cornerstones for Effective Climate Actions” in Lima, Peru on 10 December 2014. Ms. Amanda Katili-Niode, Head of the Secretariat of Indonesia’s Council on Climate Change (DNPI) pointed out that the learning strategy was an important step towards implementing Article 6 of the Convention which deals with education, training and public awareness-raising. Ms. Katili-Niode further explained that the learning strategy is feeding into a broader Article 6 strategy (known as the ‘Stranas’) which the Council is currently developing. The Stranas also covers public participation and access to information.

Indonesia’s Climate Change Learning Strategy was launched in August 2013 by the Special Envoy to the President of Indonesia on Climate Change, Mr. Rachmat Witoelar. The Strategy was supported by UN CC:Learn and prioritises three areas: building human and institutional capacity to address climate change; integrating climate change in the national education system; and improving public awareness and knowledge. So far strategy implementation has focused on building a climate change knowledge-management network with leading research institutions from Indonesia, as well as technical training on REDD+ (short for ‘Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation’).

Panelists at the UN Alliance side event, including Ms. Katili-Niode (second from the right)

Panelists at the UN Alliance side event, including Ms. Katili-Niode (second from the right)

The COP 20 side event was organized by the UN Alliance on Climate Change Education, Training and Public Awareness and involved a number of panelists, including Ms. Clare Nullis, World Meteorological Organization (WMO); Ms. Julia Heiss, UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO); Mr. Reuben Sessa, Food and Agriculture Organization of the UN (FAO); Ms. Rixa Schwarz, Centre for Environment Education India; as well as Ms. Amanda Katili Niode from Indonesia. The panel reflected the strong commitment of all Parties to implement Article 6 of the UNFCCC, based on the Doha Work Programme that was launched two years ago.

The event was jointly opened by Mr. Paul Watkinson, Head of Delegation and member of the COP 21/CMP 11 Incoming Presidency Team, France and H.E. Mr. Marcin Korolec, COP 19/CMP 9 President and Secretary of State, Poland, who highlighted the importance of the Lima Ministerial Declaration on Education and Awareness-raising.

The moderator of the event was Ms. Claudel Pétrin-Desrosiers, Vice-President for External Affairs of the International Federation of Medical Students’ Associations.

Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy has secured funding to expand its support for REDD+ with a further training event for local decision makers funded by GIZ.  The event, which took place in Putussibau on 21-22 October 2014, is a great example of the way in which UN CC:Learn can leverage further activity by attracting co-financing.

Ensuring financial sustainability is always key challenge for any long term initiative.  Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy has recently secured funding to expand its support for REDD+ with a further training event for local decision makers funded by the German Development Corporation (GIZ).  The event, which took place in Putussibau on 21-22 October 2014, is a great example of the way in which UN CC:Learn can leverage further activity by attracting co-financing.

Field trip to Betung Karihun National Park, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan

Field trip to Betung Karihun National Park, Kapuas Hulu, West Kalimantan

In 2013, Indonesia’s National Climate Council (DNPI) and the Forestry Education and Training Center of the Ministry of Forestry, with the assistance of Natural Resources Development Center (NRDC), through the Indonesia UN CC:Learn project, published a module titled “Training Modules: REDD + for policy makers at National and Sub-National“. This module has been used for a training at the West Kalimantan Province in early 2014. It has then been adopted and used as a training module for REDD + by Center for Forestry Education and Training, Ministry of Forestry of Indonesia.

Working group presentation and discussion

Working group presentation and discussion

The training material, produced as part of the early implementation phase of Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy, has since been taken up by a project led by the German Development Corporation (GIZ), to provide the first of a series of workshops to extend training to district level decision-makers. The October event brought together 30 government officials from national, province and district levels, district parliament member (DPRD), non-government organizations (NGO), and journalists. It consisted in formal training sessions, working groups as well as a field visit to Betung Karihun National Park.

Indonesia is moving forward with additional training on REDD+, following the a workshop organized through UN CC:Learn. As part of the project, existing Ministry of Forestry training materials were updated and translated. These will now be used for additional training events in the Kapuas Hulu district, West Kalimantan.

Indonesia is moving forward with additional training on REDD+, following a first workshop organized through UN CC:Learn. As part of the project, existing Ministry of Forestry training materials were updated and translated. These will now be used for additional training events in the Kapuas Hulu district, West Kalimantan. Supported by the GIZ Forest and Climate Change Programme (FORCLIME).

Find more information on Indonesia’s REDD+ training by clicking on the link.

The National Council on Climate Change (DNPI) and the Ministry of Forestry (MoF) of Indonesia organized a training workshop for decision-makers in Pontianak, West Kalimantan on 21-22 January 2014 to support the implementation of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+).

The National Council on Climate Change (DNPI) and the Ministry of Forestry (MoF) of Indonesia organized a training workshop for decision-makers in Pontianak, West Kalimantan on 21-22 January 2014 to support the implementation of Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation (REDD+). 25 participants from national and local government, parliament, business, universities, NGOs, and international partners took part. The event was supported by UN CC:Learn and facilitated by the Natural Resource Development Centre (NRDC). The workshop is part of an early implementation phase of Indonesia’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy which was launched in August 2013 (see here).

REDD+ Workshop Participants

The workshop covered five training modules in accordance with participants’ background and learning needs:

  1. The role of forests in adapting to and mitigating climate change
  2. International policies and progress in REDD+ negotiations
  3. The concept of REDD+ in Indonesia
  4. National policies on REDD+
  5. Lessons learned from REDD+ initiatives on the ground.

Working Groups

This training was facilitated by a team from the National Forestry Training Centre in collaboration with resource persons from DNPI, MoF, and NRDC.  The training was enthusiastically received by participants eager to learn about the REDD+ programme in Indonesia and to share ideas that could support related policy both at national and sub-national levels.  During the group sessions, participants were able to gain practical insights on how to implement REDD+ at province and district levels.

The workshop has triggered interest from regions in Indonesia. The training could also be conducted in countries that have a similar governance and forest management system as Indonesia.

The Government of Malawi has, in the months of September and October 2013, trained 257 forestry assistants across the country in climate change, in an ongoing effort to enhance knowledge and skills in climate change management among key personnel in sectors that are threatened by climate change.

The Government of Malawi has, in the months of September and October 2013, trained 257 forestry assistants across the country on climate change, in an ongoing effort to enhance knowledge and skills in climate change management among key personnel in sectors that are threatened by climate change. The training was implemented by Malawi’s Ministry of Environment and Climate Change Management in collaboration with the Ministry of Development Planning and Cooperation, the Ministry of Local Government and Rural Development and LEAD Southern and Eastern Africa with support from UN CC:Learn.

Speaking at the launch of the training programme in Mzuzu, the Northern Region Forestry Officer, Mr. William Nkhana said the training was timely as Malawi is experiencing high climate variability and increased incidence of extreme weather events and forestry is among the eight sectors of economic growth in Malawi that are adversely affected by climate change especially through extended droughts, which lead to land degradation and loss of soil fertility, as well as forest fires. The training course was specifically designed to equip the frontline forestry personnel with knowledge and skills in managing forests using the ecosystem-based approach, which fosters the consideration of a whole range of social and ecological inter-linkages in the management of complex ecosystems.

The trainings are part of initial activities to operationalize Malawi’s National Climate Change Learning Strategy which was officially launched on 18th September 2013 by Malawi’s Minister of Environment and Climate Change Management, Hon. Ms Halima Daud, MP at Lilongwe Hotel in Lilongwe.

For more information on the UN CC:Learn project in Malawi, click on the following link: www.uncclearn.org/malawi.

Speaking in the presence of more than 120 workshop participants,  Prof. Rachmat Witoelar, Executive Chair of the National Council on Climate Change of Indonesia and Special Envoy to the President of Indonesia on Climate Change, opened the national UN CC:Learn planning workshop in Indonesia.

Speaking in the presence of more than 120 workshop participants,  Prof. Rachmat Witoelar, Executive Chair of the National Council on Climate Change of Indonesia and Special Envoy to the President of Indonesia on Climate Change, opened the national UN CC:Learn planning workshop in Indonesia on “Developing a National Strategy to Strengthen Human Resource Capacities and Skills to Advance Green, Low Emission and Climate Resilient Development” on Tuesday, 9 October 2012.  “Indonesia is committed to addressing climate change and reducing greenhouse gases”, Mr. Witoelar stated but emphasized  at the same time that “implementing our commitment requires unprecedented human resource and skills development and a strategic approach to climate change learning in key sectors and at all levels in Indonesia.”

Prof. Rachmat Witoelar, Executive Chair, DNPI

Prof. Rachmat Witoelar, Executive Chair, DNPI, highlighted the importance of learning and skills development in achieving national climate change objectives.

The national planning workshop was organized by the National Council on Climate Change (DNPI) in the context of the global UN CC:Learn initiative, in which Indonesia is  participating as a pilot country together with  Benin, the Dominican Republic, Malawi, and Uganda,  with financial support provided  by the Swiss Development Cooperation (SDC).  The planning workshop discussed various aspects of developing the National Strategy including a work plan to launch the National Strategy by March 2013. Workshop participants originated from diverse government departments, the private sector, education institutions, and non-governmental organizations. Participants from UN organizations included representatives from the UN Development Programme (UNDP), the UN Population Fund (UNFPA), the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UN ODC), UN Office for UN REDD+ Coordination in Indonesia (UN ORCID), the UN Office for Project Services (UNOPS), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the UN Institute for Training and Research (UNITAR).

Discussions

The workshop fostered interaction between various government and stakeholder groups.

The workshop identified a number of considerations to be taken into account in developing the National Strategy over the next 6 months, including the following:

  • Giving equal consideration to the three UNFCCC Article 6 pillars concerned with public awareness raising; education; and training and skills development
  • Considering learning and skills development to support both climate mitigation and adaptation
  • Ensuring that proposed action is in line with national policies, embedded within and provides value added to existing initiatives and organizations, and led by  relevant sectors and institutions
  • Developing selected priority action for the first 2-3 years of implementation (e.g. skills development in the forestry sector and support of REDD+ implementation) while keeping a long-term vision that links the Strategy to the national development agenda
  • Identifying  “low hanging fruits” that can be easily implemented (e.g. strengthening information and knowledge sharing in matters of climate change learning)
  • Ensuring that institutional capacity development to deliver learning is an important component of the Strategy
  • Considering as early as possible modalities on how the Strategy is implemented, coordinated and monitored, including mobilization of financial resources through national and external sources.

As an immediate follow-up to the workshop, DNPI will hold a series of dialogues and focus group discussions in October and November 2012 with key government departments and  working groups to explore to what extent consideration of learning and skills action within the Strategy can support the objectives of existing government initiatives. To support strategic thinking, DNPI will also establish a small steering group of advisors that have experience in and are engaged in climate change capacity development. By December 2013, the strategic focus areas of the Strategy, as well as 10-15 initial project ideas targeted for implementation during the first two years will be identified, as a basis for further consultation. At that stage, the DNPI secretariat plans to seek feedback from members of the Council, UN partners and other key parties. A mid-term multi-sectoral and multi-stakeholder workshop to present and discuss strategic priorities is scheduled to take place in January 2013, prior to finalizing and launching the Strategy by March 2013.

Doddy Sukadri

Dr. Doddy Sukadri, National Project Coordinator, introduced the objectives of the UN CC:Learn project in Indonesia.

The workshop was informed by background presentations covering a diverse set of issues. In the introductory session, Dr. Doddy Sukadri, National Project Coordinator at DNPI summarized the key objectives of the national UN CC:Learn project. He emphasized that the planning workshop is seeking to obtain commitment from key stakeholders with the goal to take an active role in developing priorities for a follow-up programme and related activities.  He illustrated his point by using the picture of “building a house which should satisfy everyone”, including the numbers of rooms, doors, windows, and colorful painting. “The Strategy Development process, therefore, invites all interested parties to help design our desired house” Dr. Sukadri concluded.

Mr. Achim Halpaap, Associate Director of Environment at UNITAR and representing UN CC:Learn summarized the international project context. He pointed out that UN CC:Learn  directly contributes to the implementation of Article 6 of the UNFCCC in the Member States.  “An important aspect of the UN CC:Learn project in Indonesia  is to strengthen the capacities of national institutions to deliver climate change learning, in addition to addressing immedeate learning needs”,  Mr. Halpaap emphasized. He encouraged DNPI and stakeholders to engage with international UN CC:Learn partners and through the UN Climate Change Working Group in Indonesia currently chaired by the UN Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) to explore opportunities for collaboration during the development  and implementation of the National Strategy.

Session 2 Panel

Session 2 panel, moderated by Dr. Amanda Katili, DNPI, featured perspectives from Government and different stakeholder groups.

Session 2 was moderated by Dr. Amanda Katili, DNPI and National UNFCCC Article 6 Focal Point in Indonesia. It  featured background presentations from the perspectives of government and different stakeholder groups.  Dr. Ir. Yetti Rusli, Senior Advisor for Environment and Climate Change, Ministry of Forestry discussed the importance of reducing emissions from forests in Indonesia and related skills development needs to support REDD+ implementation. Mr. Ir. Paringotan Pasaribu, Environmental Manager, PT Pertamina stressed the importance of methodology and guidance for private sectors, while Mr. Ir. Rudy Syaf, Programme Manager, Community Conservation Indonesia (WARSI) underlined policy implementation and traditional knowledge to be preserved.   Focusing on the education sector, Prof. Dr. Deddy Hadriyanto, Director, Center for Climate Change Studies, University of Mulawarman highlighted a range of ongoing education and skills development initiatives in the field and suggested options to enhance information exchange and coordination to facilitate learning across different sectors and provinces in Indonesia.

UN Logo

During Session 3, representatives of UN organizations provided comments and perspectives about the National Strategy process and introduced their related projects. Mr. Budhi Sayoko, UNDP, provided insights from UNDP’s experience to support national strategy development in other areas. He highlighted the importance of developing a strategic vision and indicators, linking the Strategy to going initiatives, and considering modalities for implementation and funding to ensure that the Strategy does not remain a document only. Mr. Richard Joanes Makalew, UNFPA, drew attention to the importance of considering skills development to address population dynamics in climate change mitigation and adaptation and introduced a UNFPA research and capacity development project in Indonesia which could develop close linkages with the National Strategy. Ms. Homing Denduangrudeem, UN ORCID summarized capacity development activities to support REDD+ implementation within the broader context of fostering green and social development in Indonesia. Mr. Anthonius Rahardjo, WFP shared perspectives and experiences related with WFP climate change adaptation actions at the field level.  Mr. Achim Halpaap conveyed a message on behalf of UNESCO and the UN Children’s Fund (UNICEF) who are very much interested in the national project, but had scheduling conflicts and were unable to attend the workshop.

Working Groups

Afternoon working groups discussed details of the planning process.

In the main afternoon session, chaired by Mr. Ari Mochammad, Secretary of the Adaptation Working Group of DNPI, participants discussed a draft Terms of Reference for the Strategy Development, the draft work plan and a draft background report which summarized key initiatives related to the Strategy. Following introductory presentations by Mr. Achim Halpaap, Ms. Farida Zaituni and Mr. David Situmeang, Surveyor Indonesia, participants discussed in detail the process of developing the National Strategy in parallel working groups. During the final and concluding workshop session, Dr. Amanda Katili summarized the main conclusions of the workshop and thanked participants as well as national and international partners for their active engagement in the workshop and support for the project.

About DNPI

DNPI Logo

The National Council on Climate Change or Dewan Nasional Perubahan Iklim (DNPI) was established in July 2008 through Presidential Decree No 46/2008. It was designed to serve as the ultimate body for policy coordination among key national government agencies on matters related to climate change. It also acts as the focal point for United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) in Indonesia and Designated National Authority for Clean Development Mechanism projects. Led by the President of the Republic of Indonesia as Chair, DNPI has the Coordinating Minister of Economy and the Coordinating Minister of Social Welfare as vice chairs. The Council members are 17 Ministers (State Secretary, Cabinet Secretary, Environment, Finance, Home Affairs, Foreign Affairs, Energy and Mineral Resources, Forestry, Agriculture, Industry, Public Works, Development Planning/BAPPENAS, Fishery and Marine, Trade, Research and Technology, Transportation, Health) and Head of Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics Agency/BMKG.

Presentations

The main workshop language was  Bahasa Indonesia. Simultaneous English translation was made available for non-native speaker and participants.

The workshop featured various presentations, including:

Session 1: Workshop Opening and Introduction

Session 2: Taking Stock of National Climate Change Priorities, Initiatives and Capacity Development Challenges

Session 4: Development of a National Strategy to Strengthen Human Resource Capacities