Why Zimbabwe need to develop and adopt a Climate Change Learning strategy

To achieve a state of having a knowledgeable and educated population that is able to respond better to the effects of climate change as well as to be able to mitigate against it there is a need to adopt a comprehensive strategy that has a mix of different learning methodologies. To this effect Zimbabwe is in the process of developing a National Climate Change Learning Strategy as part of the UNCC: Learn Southern Africa Initiative which started in 2009 as a collaboration of UN Agencies that support and contribute to effective, sustainable and result-oriented learning to address climate change-related development challenges. 

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Theme: Education

Topic: Education

Type of material: Policy Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Guidance Note for Developing a National Climate Change Learning Strategy

This technical document provides methodological and organizational guidance to countries interested in taking a strategic approach to climate change learning and skills development. In particular, it lays out the process of developing a National Strategy to Strengthen Human Resources and Skills to Advance Green, Low Emission and Climate Resilient Development – or short “National Climate Change Learning Strategy” – through cross-sectoral and multi-stakeholder collaboration, and with engagement of national education and training institutions.

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Organization: UN CC:Learn Partners

Theme: Education

Topic: Education, Capacity Development

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2018

Language: English, Spanish, Russian

Drivers of change and adaptation pathways of agricultural systems facing increased salinity intrusion in coastal areas of the Mekong and Red River deltas in Vietnam

The analysis is based on 27 in-depth interviews with officials of local and national authorities as well as 198 semi-structured interviews and 11 focus group discussions conducted with farmers along three salinity transects in both deltas in 2015-2016. The results show that a dynamic interplay and feedback of various drivers of change such as policy intervention, farmers’ desire for profit maximization, changing salinity conditions, and technological development at different levels of the deltaic social-ecological system have shaped the changes and adaptations in agricultural systems over the last decades. In response to increased salinity intrusion, as exemplified by the historic salinity levels recorded in the Mekong Delta in 2015–2016, various adaptation options have been considered. These include adaptations that would lock-in agricultural production in particular systems or constrain changes in others, which is potentially problematic in light of the high uncertainty related to future changes. The study recognizes the need to apply both incremental and transformative changes and select adaptation pathways which allow for continuous change or that are reversible in order to avoid lock-ins and address future challenges. Additionally, attention should be drawn to interactions and feedbacks in future changes within and across adaptation pathways in order to prevent further increases in salinity intrusion and lock-in effects in agricultural systems within the deltas.

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Organization: UNU-EHS

Theme: Other

Topic: Agriculture and Food, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Other

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Marshallese perspectives on migration in the context of climate change

This policy brief highlights the key findings of the migration component of the research. It presents data and findings on migration patterns, drivers and impacts. It ends with a discussion of the results, with a focus on the tension between being prepared to move and fortifying to stay in place.

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Organization: UNU-EHS, IOM

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, Migration and Refugees, Population Dynamics, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Policy Document

Publication date: 2017

Language: English

Resilience of agricultural systems facing increased salinity intrusion in deltaic coastal areas of Vietnam

The resilience concept has provided a new insight and approach to the conventional perspective of agricultural management by emphasizing the need to maintain a diversity of future options to adapt to inevitable and often unpredictable changes. The concept has been taken up by various academic disciplines and development sectors, yet ways to define and operationalize resilience as a measurable concept are still being developed. We contributed to this ongoing effort by implementing a subjective resilience assessment method based on farmers’ perceptions of three resilience components: (1) the sensitivity of their agricultural systems to increased salinity intrusion, (2) the capacity to recover from salinity damage, and (3) the capacity to change to other systems if salinity increases in the future. We conducted 27 in-depth interviews with local and national authorities, 11 focus group discussions, and 118 semistructured and 219 structured interviews with farmers in case study villages located along salinity transects in the Mekong Delta and at different distances to sea dikes in the Red River Delta in Vietnam in 2015-2016. Results from the subjective resilience assessment reveal that none of the agricultural systems studied systematically scored higher than the other systems on all three resilience components, implying that an increase in one resilience component by switching agricultural systems would negatively affect others. Agricultural responses to this salinity problem will influence current and long-term adaptability of the systems to future changes in salinity intrusion and other social-ecological developments in the deltas. Improving resilience components, e.g., through policies and interventions, resource allocation, and farming system changes, to sustain agricultural production or facilitate transformation to alternative systems when necessary is critically important for agricultural systems facing stress. Complementing subjective resilience assessments with qualitative data is thus crucial for understanding the drivers of resilience to improve components of resilience for agricultural systems in the respective deltas.

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Organization: UNU-EHS

Theme: Other

Topic: Agriculture and Food, Environment, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Other

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Climate change impacts on critical international transportation assets of Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS): the case of Jamaica and Saint Lucia

This contribution presents an assessment of the potential vulnerabilities to climate variability and change (CV & C) of the critical transportation infrastructure of Caribbean Small Island Developing States (SIDS). It focuses on potential operational disruptions and coastal inundation forced by CV & C on four coastal international airports and four seaports in Jamaica and Saint Lucia which are critical facilitators of international connectivity and socioeconomic development. Impact assessments have been carried out under climatic conditions forced by a 1.5 °C specific warming level (SWL) above pre-industrial levels, as well as for different emission scenarios and time periods in the twenty-first century. Disruptions and increasing costs due to, e.g., more frequent exceedance of high temperature thresholds that could impede transport operations are predicted, even under the 1.5 °C SWL, advocated by the Alliance of Small Island States (AOSIS) and reflected as an aspirational goal in the Paris Climate Agreement. Dynamic modeling of the coastal inundation under different return periods of projected extreme sea levels (ESLs) indicates that the examined airports and seaports will face increasing coastal inundation during the century. Inundation is projected for the airport runways of some of the examined international airports and most of the seaports, even from the 100-year extreme sea level under 1.5 °C SWL. In the absence of effective technical adaptation measures, both operational disruptions and coastal inundation are projected to increasingly affect all examined assets over the course of the century. Access here

Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, Transport, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Other

Publication date: 2018

Language: English

Climate change impacts on coastal transport infrastructure in the Caribbean: enhancing the adaptive capacity of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Jamaica: A Case Study

This project aims at strengthening the capacity of policymakers, transport planners and transport infrastructure managers in small island developing States to take appropriate adaptation response measures to climate change impacts on seaports and airports. Access here

Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, Transport, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Other

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Transport Infrastructure in the Caribbean: Enhancing the Adaptive Capacity of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Saint Lucia: A case study

Two Caribbean SIDS with different environmental and socio-economic characteristics were selected as case studies: Jamaica and Saint Lucia. Detailed assessments of the vulnerability of the islands’ transportation assets were carried out to: (a) improve knowledge and understanding at the national level, and (b) test new approaches in order to develop an appropriate methodology for assessing climate- related impacts on coastal transportation in other SIDS. The present report presents the assessment of the criticality of Saint Lucia’s major transportation assets (airports and seaports) and their potential vulnerabilities to Climate Variability and Change (CV & C).

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Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Other

Topic: Transport, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2018

Language: English

Climate Change Impacts on Coastal Transport Infrastructure in the Caribbean: Enhancing the Adaptive Capacity of Small Island Developing States (SIDS) Jamaica: A Case Study

Because of this heightened vulnerability [as further detailed in Chapters 1 and 2 of this report], development of climate change adaptation strategies and policies are of paramount importance to Jamaica at this time in its planning framework. No longer can Jamaica, or any of the other Caribbean SIDS, afford to ignore the looming impacts of climate change on their respective nations.

An examination of the cost of the impacts of climate change on Jamaica was examined in Chapter 2 of the report. The analysis revealed that the current cumulative loss of GDP due to damage associated with natural disasters was estimated to be in the order of $120 billion (roughly 7% of GDP). This is a significant number, which is even more grave given the already slow growth and fragility of Jamaica’s economy. When this is coupled with potential climate change-induced impacts, such as an increase in the number of extreme hurricanes, the figure is even more worrisome as it is likely to rise. Estimates indicate that it could reach as high as 56 per cent of GDP by 2025 if climate predictions are accurate.

Download file: English

Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Other

Topic: Transport, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2018

Language: English

Climate Risk and Vulnerability Assessment Framework for Caribbean Coastal Transport Infrastructure

The framework provides a structured way for organizations in SIDS to approach climate change adaptation. Climate change adaptation can be daunting, particularly when gaps in data create uncertainties around what conditions may arise and what the costs of impacts and the costs and effectiveness of responses may be over time. This framework is intended to help SIDS overcome these challenges by providing a practical approach that uses available data to inform decision-making at a facility, local, and national level. The primary audience is port and airport managers in Caribbean SIDS, though it will also be relevant to local and national government agencies.

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Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Other

Topic: Transport, Water, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2018

Language: English

Port Industry Survey on Climate Change Impacts and Adaptation

The present report relates the key findings of the survey, together with some additional information about climate trends and climate-related impacts on seaports and some concluding remarks. The respondent port sample collectively handles more than 16 % of global seaborne trade and can be considered as representative. Although the majority of respondents had been impacted by weather/climate-related events, including by extremes, the study revealed important gaps in terms of relevant information available to seaports of all sizes and across regions, with implications for effective climate risk assessment and adaptation planning.

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Organization: UNCTAD

Theme: Adaptation

Topic: Adaptation, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2018

Language: English

Climate Research for Development in Africa: Using climate science to drive Africa’s development

 

The Climate Research for Development in Africa initiative (CR4D) maximizes opportunities presented by climate change and variability while addressing challenges posed to Africa’s socio-economic development efforts.

Download file: EN

Organization: UNECA

Theme: Science

Topic: Science, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Climate Research for Development in Africa Programme strategy (2019–2023)

The strategic plan is aimed at improving knowledge, access, quality, usability and the mainstreaming of climate information into development planning and programmes to attain Africa’s development objectives, as framed by the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development Goals, the Paris Agreement and Agenda 2063: The Africa We Want

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Organization: UNECA

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Other

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Making Every Dollar Count: how investing in climate information pays dividends for the key socioeconomic sectors of Africa

The framework shows that the socio-economic benefits generated from higher-quality climate information services far outweigh the costs of investing in such services. In addition, the cost of investing in climate information services is minimal compared with the significant costs incurred if countries fail to invest sufficiently in them.

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Organization: UNECA

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, Economic Analysis, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Policy Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Using a nexus approach to improve climate resilience and benefit society, the economy and the environment

To address a specific gap, the Economic Commission for Africa (ECA) has been using conventional approaches, policy and investment assessments along with forecasting tools. The analyses conducted are often comparatively static (mostly employing linear approaches) and narrowly focused on a sector or a specific set of thematic indicators. Instead, a systemic, nexus approach is needed that takes into account social, economic and environmental indicators within a sector, and link them across sectors to generate dynamic projections that make it possible to estimate policy outcomes for all economic actors

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Organization: UNECA

Theme: Adaptation

Topic: Agriculture and Food, Energy, Environment, Adaptation, Risk Reduction/Management, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Policy Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Integrating Insurance into Climate Risk Management

This toolbox has been developed to provide a series of specific questions to answer when government officials and other stakeholders consider the use of insurance as a CCA and DRM measure. It offers an insurance perspective to DRR and CCA, with a focus on the added value of climate risk insurance. It explores necessary questions to be considered in order to assess risk, develop risk reduction measures, address residual risk, prepare for imminent disaster impacts, respond, and recover from disaster impacts. This toolbox has been developed for the agricultural sector in developing countries to help stakeholders transfer their risks involved in extreme weather events. Access here

Organization: UNU-EHS

Theme: Other

Topic: Agriculture and Food, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Guidance Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

Towards Our Common Digital Future

This report represents the greatest challenge the German Advisory Council on Global Change has taken on since it was founded in the Rio year 1992 – intellectually, politically and ethically. 

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Organization: UNU-EHS

Theme: Other

Topic: Technology, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English

World Employment and Social Outlook 2018: Greening with jobs

While climate change mitigation measures may cause short-term job losses, this report shows that a just transition to a more sustainable economy offers much potential for job creation and the promotion of decent work. The report also looks at key issues linked with the path to a greener economy, including macroeconomic and environmental policy, public programmes, worker protection and skills.

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Organization: ILO

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, Green Jobs/Economy, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English, French, Spanish

Working on a warmer planet: The effect of heat stress on productivity and decent work

The phenomenon of heat stress refers to heat received in excess of that which the body can tolerate without physiological impairment. It is one of the major consequences of global warming. By 2030, the equivalent of more than 2 per cent of total working hours worldwide is projected to be lost every year, either because it is too hot to work or because workers have to work at a slower pace. This report shows the impact of heat stress on productivity and decent work for virtually all countries in the world. It presents innovative solutions based on social dialogue to promote occupational safety and health for the most vulnerable groups of workers.

 

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Organization: ILO

Theme: Other

Topic: Environment, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Analytical-Technical Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English, French, Spanish, Italian

Persons with disabilities in a just transition to a low-carbon economy

Equally, involving persons with disabilities – who comprise 15 per cent of the global population – is critical to achieving the goals of the Paris Agreement and the UN Sustainable Development Goals that pledges to ‘leave no one behind’.​ This offers key recommendations for governments, enterprises, trade unions, UN and international organizations, non-governmental organizations, and development partners.

 

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Organization: ILO

Theme: Other

Topic: Green Jobs/Economy, Human Rights and Justice, COP25 List of UN Publications

Type of material: Policy Document

Publication date: 2019

Language: English